xt7xd21rgd4g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xd21rgd4g/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1931 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. Quarterly, Publication suspended 1922 and resumed with v. 1, no. 1 (May 1929); v. 5, no. 9 (May 1933) not published; issues for v. 37, no. 2-v. 40, no. 1 (spring 1966-spring 1969) incorrectly numbered as v. 38, no. 2-v. 43, no. 1; v. 40 (1969) complete in 3 no. journals  English [Lexington, Ky. : University of Kentucky Alumni Association, Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus University of Kentucky. Kentucky alumni 2002- Kentucky alumnus monthly Kentucky alumnus, vol. 05, no. 03, 1931 text Kentucky alumnus, vol. 05, no. 03, 1931 1931 2012 true xt7xd21rgd4g section xt7xd21rgd4g ’ ' . ,_  ' “ =°‘== ».   W1,  _.
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      _ 2 KENTUCKY ALUMNUS
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 7 I   I KENTUCKY ALUMNUS
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_ ·   Oftlcial Organ of the Alumni Association of the University of Kentucky A
I " » Q Published Monthly, except July and August, on the Cnmpus of the University, at Lexington
 . * ¥   l I l . .. ..  ?.7..777r 7) 71;- ?e 77 ..é(.;?-#7777 7 7. 77777
. · , l   $ Volume III JANUARY, 1931 Number 5 j
I · — . T · _.__}4?.4LM,..L7-..7.7-.7  . .
` ; _   Entered as second Class Matter at the Postoffrce at Lexington, Ky, May 22, 1929, under the Act of March 3, 1879  
E l ·I  #‘;‘F*·#;*’—"'4"*"Y""'" ‘’’'’ " ’ wm"' I ‘‘‘*' és ·
_ 5 2 I i · SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, $1.50 A YEAR  
` ‘* l 5 T _ g __   .7477 77 Gl
.   l       JAMES S. SHROPSHIRE. '29 ..... Editor and Manager E 1
. g l l .   { ki I BETTY HULETT, ‘30 ........ Assistant Manager l-O
.; 7 E   l"   » MARGUERITE McLAUGHLIN, '03 .7... Associate Editor [9
'     ‘     A HELEN KING, '25 .......... Associate Editor ‘ 5
l 7   1 _   .  ___/_*_4lWVM Mil   _ Vlillilrilfrl   V irrr   lll-
: ‘ { l ~g· OFFICERS or THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE iic
  g l E     LEON K. FRANKEL, 'O0 .... President W. C. Wilson, '13 Dr. George H. Wilson, *04 eil)
_   l ` i MRS. RODES ESTILL, '21 . . . Vice-President Dr. E. C. Elliott, '02 Wyland Rhoads, ’15 th
_ .   l i ~ JAMES S. SHROPSHIRE, '29 . Secretary-Treasurer Lulic Logan, '13 Walter Hillenmeyer, ’11 IO
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7 I I z 7 ` V.- I ALUMNI CLUBS
‘ · W2
·   ‘7 l ASHLAND ALUMNI CLUB strong Cork and Insulation Co., 120 West lm
· ? ’ I J. Sneed Yager, president, Blackstone Build- Illinois St. th
{ V i“g· AShl““d GREATER CINCINNATI onio Ni
  V ATLANTA ALUMNI CLUB Miss Lillian Rasch, Holmes High School, pre- kg
_   l 7   C. L. Templin, president, 764 Greenwood Ave. 5id€Ilt il
I l l I LSV George A. Wisenberger, secretary-treasurer, HMFY Whalcyl Ci¤¤i¤¤¤ii. Vivi?-Dfcsidcnt wl
, il li Y, M, C, A, George H. Hailey, Cincinnati, treasurer tl;
V ·  ’ I Warren Clare, vice-president, care Clare and MISS Adclc Siadcl S€¢1'€l·11¤‘y· IU
I I ·   » C°·· Bone Alien Building CLEVELAND ALUMNI CLUB id
  . BELL COUNTY CLUB J. M. Neiding, president, care Cleveland Trust tg
  Mrs. Geo. W. McKee, secretary, Box 66, Pine- C°·» E- Ninth & Euclid I0
  ville, Ky_ W. Crawford Buwlay, vice-president, 914 Dres- m
Gi BIRMINGHAM ALUMNI CLUB dm had ti`
V. `€ _ R. L. Mays, 3018 East Overlook Road, Cleve- ])l
  3 J. M. Sprague, president, Box 66, Ensley, Ala. land Heights O
·. . . . l , ' - ' , - ·· ’ ' .
V. _ S C. Elbert vice- president 321 Brown Maxx LOUISVILLE CLUB Sl
I Building, Birmingham. _ l _ j H
  E. J. Kohn, secretary, Box, 35, Ensley, Ala. Tom A` BMl°m}“c’ _25’ i{"°S‘d°“i — in
lg _ T A. B. nesweu, treasurer, P. 0. Box 1174, Bir- J· B°“*’~‘d D““““g· 2}- “°°'i"°s‘d€}" _ T
rl   mlnglmm, Ala. Mrs. Tom A. Ballentme (nee Marie Pfeiffer. _
EQ T Louisville, ex-227, secretary f il}
gi l · BOWLING GREEN CLUB A. Pete <··Litt1e Pete") Lee, sis, treasurer. ii
ll - i Wé.;.tCrz'¥gl;p};·;sidtg1;|ll care Western Kentucky NEW YORK CLUB _  
L B ° ° ° rs °g° Samuel A. Smith, president, 17 Jehu Street. · ‘
‘ l i Mary Lee Taylor, secretary, care Western New York City ll;
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‘   l Kentucky State Teachers C0u€°€' W. G. Hillen, secretary-treasurer, 850 Freling- L l;
  M BUFFALO ALUMNI CLUB huysen Ave., Newark, N. J. bl
· I. F. T3yl01‘, president, 151 Virgil Ave. PHILADELPHIA CLUB Gl
. l _ l I J. W. Gcdgel, vice-president, 129 Harlem L_ C_ Davidson, *23, presldel-lt_ S
 . R· A· SUB? trcasurcn °‘° B¤ff¤i¤ Forge CB- Richard Bozeman, ’29, secretary-treasurer.  . tj
 l I W. D. Bailey, secretary, 129 Harlem. WASHINGTON ALUMNI CLUB I ll_
ju  CHICAGO ALUMNI CLUB Jesse I. Miller, president, Commercial Nation- U
` H. M. Nicholls, president, 104 South Michigan al Bank Building U
° l AME · Ave. Elmer D. Hayes, secretary, care Interstate
L l _ 40-4 C. B. Sauer, secretary-treasurer, care Arm- Commerce Commission. ‘ il
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‘ KENTUCKY ALUMNUS 3  
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o t e A umm and Former Students  
of the University  
5
- By Dr. FRANK L. McVEY  
5 I hope that Santa Claus has been fairly tive students are asking for employment fj “ l
3 generous in his_ visits tO_ you despite the is really beyond belief, The university has —` l  
____ general economic COnd1t10ns thl‘0ugh0ut practically no scholarships other than a   " i
the nation. Whatever may have been his few graduate scholarships and fellowships ti { “ E
be gifts I take great pleasure in Wishing you and it really ought to have a number of   l l
a happy new year and the eehleYen'1_ent Ol: scholarships for needy students who have cia] I  é
your amhltlene t0l` 1931- At thle tlnle Ol made a good record in high school. After `ii   - l
year executives everywhere are extending he reaches the university the student of-   2 Z
arf greetings to members of their 01`ganiZa— ten needs help at critical periods in his ‘   i l
tions. Certainly, with that in view no more student life. The university has a stu-   il E
u_ *04 appropriate tinl_e c<>ulul3S   ° 
Sian in the educational world about the will be established in various parts of the   as 
problems of college education. There is no country. I trust_als0, that when these -   V 
more critical group than a college faculty. groups are established they will nieunteln  gg  {
,,m·€,._ » The members of faculties are thinking their O1`g`2llllZ3tlOl`l$ and meet S0nle“`llat    Q
hard about the problems of higher educa- regularly throughout the Neal`- l can    4
r tion, and it is desirable that the alumni promise through the pages of THE l    
` - should follow these discussions and take ALUMNUS that some one w1ll_come out    Q,
_ an intelligent attitude toward them, I and talk _to them about the ·LlH1V€1`SIt)’- if L   i
°u-cet' have long been Of the Opjhigh that One they desire lt. Olll: Alullllll 3SSOe1t1t1f)ll   l 
_ . reason why the alumni are so much more has neVe1` been P?ll`tlellla_l`lY Stl`0llg» lt (lla _    
ehng- i]']t@]`€St€d if] §\thl€tiCS than Qdllcatlon is \V?¥S has b€€n,faC€d \v1th   Pyoblernb    
T l>e0ause they are not informed about the of inadequateiunds_and yet it IT doing _   — 
, educational problems of the institution. some 1nte1‘eStln§§_tlllhgS· lt Coll tl do fl   A 
So I am writing about two or three educa- greet deal mere lf lt had large] _S“l°l?Oi{t    J
'°"· I tional matters that the alumni might help and membership. So when y0u al el  li    
develop in the next year. There are some ing of §'0lll` Dl`0bl€mS of th? Y€alhflE “€    
ation-- i immediate needs that press hard on the as your blessings. l ani Plsklng   cl Y yell   I
I university. think of your alma mater and tuin oi eihn; E  _,
lygtaje I The number of students who apply l01‘ Y0lll` mind Wlmt lt means te yo}?   _“ flu .€_ `
ll€ll) Q\’Q]‘y year is Very large and the   QF]]t]'}2Q;`[]%   t§l;é)E§;`lI]ClS of ot Glb db “’€   _
r elheunt of corres yondence that comes to us O e S 3 e · L `_  
`_-{ llle university anihually in which prospec- FRANK li- McVEY, l l€nl(l€llt·   . U
,4- ..     *·     .»~..·. » · I Ak L

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I Q sg   4 KEN·rUoKY ALUMNUS
,   i I . Why Stop Learning? ··
 _   V V   _     — —· selves enter other fields; those who can- I
 · . 5   not do so, are faced with economic re- -—
 L. I I e g     adjustment never so important as to- .
I , lf . y ji       day. Most of the people of America to-
i I I E l   _:_j Z_ i     day engaged in industry are at work in V
· i V 3 » ‘ . i _   << 3;  fields which did not exist twehtyaive rl
~ i · T I   _  i.u..· 1.   years ago. The age which we are just eu-
— V all  F?.`>§Q`_£;Q,i.;. l`_`e   . tering will be ever more difficult in this all
; I 2 I   ·`‘i`i·   l‘eaeee’e· Tlleee Wee Fell etllust tllelllaelyee l ri
5 . ll.   Vi Iss:.   te elle iaeidly alilllme eaireaia ei me ee-
_ V ls I   EII -;_r.’e   cial and economic order will experience · SO
VQ i   | Ii} II   little difficulty. Those who cannot, will . sm
" l   i   ``ii·‘   lied it ieeieaeleely dltllcult ie llye in a tie
l       I   U   rapidly changing economic order. DO
  I   I     ii‘l’ America has not produced much in the tei
_ l I ' l l   way of culture. Sinclair Lewis in receiv- thi
A   l I Q `_ I     ing the Nobel Prize in literature in Swe- S0l
i 1 l I l I I   .... den last memili had miieli te say ef Amer- ie
l E i i   ica’s Cultl-l1`€—SO much that he was spok- do
I I I e     en of as both indiscreet and impolite. But gy
 ’ . V   l   Ameriea has net medaeed a seed deal m ini
_ i . l `'“;‘·’`’*   ‘‘`‘ the way of culture. We have stood out in M;
Y l I ‘``;   the field of science, in photo-drama, in in-
. I V ‘``i`;t’·l’‘’ "**"° ````` """""""*"""" vention, but we have been too busy mak-
.l I DR_ WELLINGTON PATRICK ing money to produce much in other fields.
il ,   _ _ _ __ _ We have produced little in the way of lit-
,   I i**’ Auggggngfolihszoiktcéte t;@dUI§;;g;;§g, el erature, art, sculpture, music, and other
 e   I ,¤ great fields of culture when compared I!
i   ‘ 4 HOW long is it possible for one to com with other great nations of the world.
» P tinue to learn? This is a question which _ Amelflcel lS ltlllldly ¥lDPl`Qel€hlhg el Del`- on
I has been asked mem, times in Educational iod having great opportunities for leisure. Of
  circles in recent years and several rather Already We see ell the h0l`lZ0h el llVe_€l?l_§' . stl
ll I accurate studies have been made attempt- Weeks llVe·h0ll1` day fel` lnduSt1`y· Th1S 15 pr
, `{ ing to answer it. Thorndike has been par- eertain to come in the nextdecade. What th
  Ԥ' I ticularly interested in the subject and re- le Ameflee- going to do with 1tS_ lelSlll`e ne
  I cently published the results of his studies. tlme?_ Al1‘e&€lY the l`lght_ llee Ot lelnllle ge
i 57 l ‘ Other studies have been made at the Uni- time 1S becoming 3 m?lJ01` efllleeltlellfll ni
IQ . versity of Minnesota and elsewhere. The problem- When we le¥ll`h_ to make use el
il _ results of these all point out that possibly thle lelSlll‘e We shall heglll to detlelell lll su
il V ' one’s ability to learn increases 35 the cultural lines, for CL1ltll1`€ and leisure are by
  I years go by up to somewhere between {if- e0·D?ll`tlle}’$· We lll’e€ll€t that Amellcd ls gi`
II Q - ty and sixty years, remains constant for a &DD1'0€tehmg 3 lleW e1‘¥l of ellltlll`e mdtle za
ll. i period of a few years thereafter until the possible by the enjoyment of our new mi
V ‘ l onset of old age and then begins to drop. found leisure. all
I   l This upsets old ideas that education is All these facts point to the necessity of as
_ I - . particularly a_ matter for children and adult education, of learning while one " in
I , Il youth, and points to the fact that educa- earns, of taking advantage of opportuni- Dr
l tion is possible and desirable for adults. ties to study those things which we did · to
W l A V The age which we um just entering will not study while in college, of continuing se
l , V— . _ I uc doubt go down in hjsteyy as (me Of to grow as the world moves forward and sn
.- ‘ I · I great scientific accomplishment and in- makes Pl`0gl“eSS·
  dustrial readjustment. The need of adult The University Extension movement is N'
 ‘ l education has never been so apparent as more than fifty years old. Originating lll llfl
I now. The invention of some small me- England in the nineteenth century, it tli
; AMF chanical device today often puts thous- spread to America about 1880, and ilftel ht
  . 40** ands of men out of a trade or profession. a decade or two of sporadic effort, set- llt
l l I NEV Those who are able to readjust them- (Continued on Page Twelve) is
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I Knrrrucxy Anuivmus 5   o
_`;"““_ i
  EDITORIALS l  
»mic re-   I   ‘
Braga ig- · HAPPY NEW YEAR work, build for your Alma Mater, and ex-  
“ ·` . "* Dre `d d th ht th' b- f ‘ i
W0*`k_*¤ HE OiT1C€1`S·Of the Alumni Associa- _ieo€Se§eO3ureii is xy Otiagsi Sagniiheisygur rf e   
mtymya T tion t3k€ IZIIIS ODDOYUIUIIY to wish 9-II Committee in charge of this organization   3
last QI)- of the members of the association, may better do ite W0i·k_   ‘ E
? *** iFI**S all graduates and former students a HAP- _______ ‘ ‘ i {
EITISG V .‘ `* - ‘  5
fthe ri? *’YWt£LDWE*EI2E§;Er§‘t*i£ §£r“§§;QI#&,§·oo ENOWMENT **0** ASS<><>******<>N        
l)€I`I€IIQ€ eo with a feeling of pride for the things UR eirfieeie are forced each ear te   i j  E
¥*°** .**’*** acc<>mi¤*iS*¤e¤* *¤St year by <>¤*r ¤ma*¤iZ¤- O send out numerous bills andyletters fié é Z
*V€ *¤ 3 tion; such as the revival of clubs at many te graduates asking them te eithei, ·     g
· i>¤*mS <>V€*‘ *¤**€_¤&>¤****‘¥r the ***¤*‘e¤S€d m- ueeome members of the Alumni Aeeoera-   f S
I1 IH tht? t€*`€St of &I¤**m* m thau`_AI}l*a Mater, and tion or ask those that are already mem-   Q it
ii i-eeeiy, the placing of_our aesociation on_ a much bers to pay their dues ahethei. yeah   _ _
in Sire- S¤¤¤5*·3*·_f*¤==*¤s;=r** *§>e_S*Sr _¤** Of Wh*¤*¤_mm*¤ witnm me iaet few years the membership   I j
>f Amei? E10 P*¤*<**‘* to <>***‘ ***‘ga***· oereuorr will start securing infor- ·  i  
""" nlm · Za“°“ to “a*`*`*’ 0** Such a *°*`°g*`am· *’°“ iS~ the Jublishing of a new alumni ii. ’ 
Our HQ", may be asked to a*°*°€a" °“ p"°g"a’“S at     Htnce we are asking that when ii I
alumni clubs, and in various other ways u€c_ X', fam; that Office ei card to be »    
Essity Of asked to give a lime Of your uma your iairiilldlecfylgivin the desired information   j
ihile 0119 I interest and money to the building of this B dou Ot’°ia ii aside and let it he thmwii `”   4
pportuni- Dfogram. May this committtee feel free you On .y t d i mi in eh biaiik   j i
li we did to call on you? Will you volunteer for away bug lling]? bggg at eiiee A {Q I 
mtinuiug Service in the building of such an expan— ‘°I°'aC€S an -` k d   ¢
Ward tmd eiye 1.0 rama To you some of the queSt1OHS aS_€   i
` Atpong time you needed ure university, mism Seem of mile imp¤*ma¤¤e» *>¤* **t**i*<   i
zemeut is NOW that you are taking your place in the af you; f01`m€1`T%;iSnl;;i2i{t§eS’Eggiy Jiiigtiog $1  i
Hating III ;YI*€€I     and events, yOu 3_]‘€ if] ai p§')1S]a. iE'l3i§IO1§;an}{;Ou· *   ii
t ··, it 1011 w ere you can help the schoo t 3 ‘ ._ _ - ‘  ·;
gngiliifter ‘ has meant much to you, and it pggdg you When completed, _a di1ecto1y_ will} be i t A 
{Ort, Set- now, as you needed it then. Give to the Sent to every alumyni iivho isiendsieiiiierieiociie  ii
re) aSS0€lation y0u1° full and earnest Support, l“l€1‘ C2t1`Cl SO that V\€ 3\€ IS O   _V
_ help the committee entrusted with this 1‘€Ct 3d€I1`€SS- I`__ a t *
>·~e_·_ ‘  ° , _· L —~ ··· to e = T*"““`"   I it    ._
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 g     ·   · 6 KENTUCKY ALUMNUS
    I ~ I   l
L    i .   E Dicker Hall
  - _ I ij   » — By BETTY HULETT
 ·   V     Among the unusual and unique places the most valuable collection. To end the
l   , l ., i   of interest on a university campus, there discussion, Colonel Thompson bought Tif-
_ N ,l l ? l is always one of outstanding prominence, fany’s entire collection.) Presented with
I g   I` _ I _ one which harbors things that are differ- this collection are two jade trees and two
. i E ; . ent. This place is held at the University crystal trees made in China. The trees
` ·     II _ of Kentucky by Dicker hall, a part of the are made of solid jade and solid crystal
. V     l El~lgil]nol·`g4 E\’[g(;hglli(1;gll h;l]l_ It WHS 11€C€SS&11‘y fOI` 82lCh ltéélf, pf-ltzll and
I       1-;,   Dlekel. hall is ln the nature ef H large stem to be ground out of this hard miner-
·   l— igllj  study mom Wha-Q u¤Supa—via.· may gl; gee)l>lggg;g;Iea;g1I{ugeQgglggegg fljeel  
Y ` _       may be had. Included in its equipment are are any Eeguly ` g QA
E ` I; T if i   U twelve _lm`gi *¤eblee_ made gem     Included in the collection are specimens
3 . l l   mole flee t_ at eeueed we C°nE}f“I€lbY of various minerals from all over the
’   l I¤ glhe? Et $2** C“tC?O‘YH Siem lh1‘§l¤<;llll)l°l world. There are many samples of petri-
` $ I { I ; B 3- 6 €m`Y ey S_ Om€· *9 it 6* fied wood, quartz from Brazil, Switzer-
   I   · l I E I ` M9 th€ Bxact Shape el the tl'€€· lhe Wm land, Madagascar, and Colorado; hema-
· _ j l 4 I P , SUDDOITS W€1‘€ made lh the Ellglll€€lIlllS tite from England; crocidolite from South
, l - I   Department at the umversityr Africa; celestite from Sicily; curite from
l   F ,,=I l T G fOUl"lt&lll the Belgian Con-
i E I ` atonesideoftlie _;     we gO;g1·al)hit€
V Q l nl   room is made of Nall 1;,;, `     from the Island
    rocks that were + - It `gé   _,_.   C') ·F§E;;g:g__ ·-le, Of Ceylon; e_l_
{   Pllflvid lll‘> Ywm -   fr   ,  —-    r~   '°» "‘ege;ee» mandite garnet
‘l I — A me the banks of the     I  F  ,   from Alaska; il-
i I   Kentucky lIlV€l`· if   Y r     ·»r’;$i»"$??#?°·;   I II vaite from the
lz , ,l I The l‘0€kS RFQ hl   ·     l   Island of Elba;
{l j “ their n a t u 1I a l l         *       ktypeite f r o m
  VI   Shapes, RS th€Y e‘ `_ - ll J   nlllll}  { A Bohemia; diop-
I _l were not cut or fl 4. ;~ ;__   *;;;.7-;=“’—¤j-··gee_ll=—;l;·le       tase from the
  shaped at all be- I l   'ee          [   French _C o n_g 0;
fl I fore the struc- ..·_··  l  _i= %+ in -r;’?;_   3%; . I   e ; laz u rite from
il , ture was built. ·~  — I  eg;]   , ,  y a...A-`*':_ m§£%· - -¤.;__.- P e r s ia; calcite
    l At the bottom ,'T "   I·l»   _ l _ from Italy and
- of the fountain » . · "*’»··¤;    — i- 4" ` “’ ` z. ¢- .° i~ Durham E n g I
~l. · *· — , · ‘ » _ * 1 Y '*
in 1 T ` is 3 l3l`g€ gflld ` ` B I s t i b n i te from
  I · fish DOO} hl which DICKER HALL Japan; sidernite
§* , there are hun- from Germany;
  I Y dreds of tiny gold fish swimming about. sulphur from Sicily; halite from Prussia;
  l Opposite the fountain, we see the open emerald and opal from Australia; axinite
ll   · fire place which radiates warmth and from France; limonite from Nova Scotia;
lr 1 g cheerfulness- This, too, was made of rock and many other rare pieces of great in- l
II _ { I from the Kentucky river. Over the man- terest.
` § l l ` telpiece are relics such as old sabers and On n Shelf le a large BO_e_CenSn.letel.
I l l l daggers. On eachlside of the mantelpiece Skin 25% feet in length. This Wee pre. _
. l I r is an old lamp lwhich once graced the old- Sented to Deen Andersen by Mn J_ l_ Lyle
, _ fashioned C9·I`l'13·g€· _ _ _ of the class of ’96. This snake was killed
__ . l The College ef Engineering ns the prqud and me hide tanned iii Brazil. it is said
_ l _ I poslsessor of a rare geological collection that about a million are tanned each y€3l` I
l I I which was presented to Dean F. Paul An- for use in shoes, purses, travelling bags
’ derson by the late Colonel William Boyce etc. I
A Thompson of New York. Colonel Thomp- Around tho walls gf the hall are the
  _ AM; son is said to have had the most valuable pictures of all the graduating classes
é 40-4 collection of this kind in the world. (The from the first one in 1893 through the
i   . V Nev story is told that a dispute arose as to class of 1930. The first person to gl‘€}d· ·
g l . : PI whether Colonel Thompson or Tiffany had uate in Engineering at the universitl'
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tp hite _ _ _  
a Island Interior of the old Library. soon to be transformed mt-o a Museum at the University Ve   i
AQHA 1. AAA.; was Prof. A. R. Johnson who, by himself, the museum will be devoted mainly to `  
_i€a,n$ comprised the class of ’93. Also, near the Archeology. There IS already enough  ei i
or a’t;]A fireplace is a lifesize portrait of Joseph material to more than fill the building. t  git V 
?mEibe(i Dicker, for whom the hall was named. Most of the material was gathered 1n Ken- `  fi
) feeei Perhaps many at tha gi-aduatas aud tucky. It is the present plan of the de-   i  V
. dia} alumni remember Frank, the large black l>31`tm€¤t to have 3 S3mDl€ of 93011 kind of Q   t  ~
em uae monkey which was a favorite of many of grave that has been found. When these   _
~ 0 H gu. the students on the campus. Frank is graves are found they are photographed     i 
Te e fren; gone but he cannot be forgotten as his in every detail, then every th1ng about VV_,   L
1. Ceicite ` skeleton is mounted in a large ccaseh in them is saved. The graves will be exactle V wt  jt _
A ’ , Dicker hall Nor is he alone. Bcsi e im as they were when they were discovere   .
RIYETIIS is the skeleton of a baby €hlml>¥lHZ€€i even to the positions of the skeletons in   i 
1 _ " i Betty by name. them  yi; j. 
°$i$eiiiiiAS Dam Atdtrttt tart that the Ctgtgi tt There are many thousand artifact to be 1    
}ermany1 Engttttrms hast tote fqtt t_ G Pee 0 a placed in cases These consist mostly of _    ti
Prussia. room such as Dicker hall, wheie the stu- eiete pottery fabrics Sheu bene and   _; 
_ - · A dents could have unsupervised study, be · . · f ’ .H’ _ .t th.    ,_;
“· aX““t€ ll wed to mix with one another and get “’°0d materm I Spa°"`.W‘ wml., ‘S · ~  1
a Scotia: ge (ieem ebeut peepie Hem their eeeeeiee will include theeosteoigeicalthmaterialdef V {_  V1
· t in- .- - · — _ Prof, A, M. Mi er. so, ere are e _ g —
gAAAAA Eiiisié? i€S§§}4t.Ht€OS§5Sti$F3$VS‘ t2§§i‘i?}. Steiet¤¤s of it tot at   tntmigs and ~ at Af
>¤t¤~t<>t<~¤· ttttwttt t<> mttgtt tttt "gttW   §i§’.§l§‘y°§L1§§£L‘;“0`£'i§E££‘§‘i§`§§i»f‘A   °“ -. tgt  
was pre- ac e >t >t ‘ _ _ _ V; i
J- I- Lyle The outstanding "uniqueness" of Dick- if .1t IS p°Ss1b1€’ th? basemenaof the .   A;
ms- iuAAAdA ""` har is S°°“ *’° be th"?*‘t€‘l"’d* f°" tht AgAAiiA$pA§dnidihbiaxoegiiongiici       t 
It ii Soil- Umttttttr .°f Kentucky IS gmg t° have p(éeeeeai—y for that purpose. it may be   ;
AAA; bri = 2* na-tu"] h‘St°"y m“S?*“‘“· Up°“ tht °°m‘ that ip the future a wing will be added to  Yi  
Am° Agn Eéegglii§§e§]€W?i?Wbelk;ii,1e3Q AE)}2;1.°l€eC€QAe the building to provide additional space.   V
3l`€ the 1 Science department for the purpose of Professor F¤¤kh<>¤Seti Saysfhat ftlgiy   t
g classes putting On dig i f their thou- hope to have a curator IH cha1ge 0 e  
`p ay Some- O - ‘ ' th t it can be open at regular .> 
ough the sands of interesting relics which have Ettgfhnéiesoehe ttpubee The date Of this   .
. _ , . . 0 ‘S -  
i to g1adV been stored away for yeai s. V V h hes not been definitely decided  it  .
universlil . According to Prof. W. D. Funkhousei, C Pmge VV-_ IV
e . Z  ’  V V V V __ Val AV   VV V eVVVV i?*·i“V:iea_     - .  g V .·
A er`-; I V V V VAV A V e · _ ’· " Z 
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‘ i _     s KENTUGKY ALUMNUS
_   ‘·   ‘ Future Needs of tl`l€ UH1V€YSlty AIC ()l1tl1I'1€Cl
, ; . . V   , •
 , t     t     By President lVlcVey
 .- i   . A A   By mt. FRANK L. Mevny
{ A l Y ` Ai In most of the articles and comments the colleges on the four year basis. I am
`     I l _ about the University of Kentucky that desirous, therefore, of presenting in this
‘ t sl _ I l have appeared in newspapers and pediod- article some of the more pressing needs
- _ - [   · i _ icals during the last five years, reference of the university at this particular time
Z , 5 Q 3 i has been made to the material develop- Ieibomtgrieg Needed
i   ·   » l   ment ef the institntien-_ The writers have The physical sciences at the University
i. C i ll·   ser talked about the building program, the ef K€ntLicky in-e extensively Organized
-5 i L » _ AA ji expanswn cf the Campus and the m‘?1`eaS‘ and the work in these fields is well pre-
_ i _ 5   Qi - mg ¤Umb€l` of Stlld€lltS· These lt€mS had sented and extends into the graduate lev-
a ,   q   a news value