xt7xgx44s98k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xgx44s98k/data/mets.xml The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. 1929 bulletins  English The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. Copyright 1925-2010. FNS, Inc. Use and reproduction of this work are permitted for the purposes of research and scholarship if non-commercial. All other rights are reserved to the copyright owner. Federal copyright law prohibits the reproduction, distribution, or public display of copyrighted materials without the express and written permission of the copyright owner, unless fair use or another exemption under copyright law applies. Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletins The Quarterly Bulletin of The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc., Vol. V, No. 3, December 1929 text The Quarterly Bulletin of The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc., Vol. V, No. 3, December 1929 1929 2014 true xt7xgx44s98k section xt7xgx44s98k I
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    VOL. V. DECEMBER, 1929 NO. 3  
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' THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN OF `  
THE FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE. Inc.  
Published quarterly by the Frontier Nursing Service, Lexington, Ky.  
sugscmpwmu PRICE $1.00 pm YEAR I
VOLUME V. DECEMBER, 1929 NUMBER 3 it
"Entered as second cmss matter June 30, 1926, at the Post Office at Lexington,  
Ky., under the Act of March 3, I879."  
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§A-_r_.d______r A _, __2§* F CQEQEH'E¥E1X;iHEETL;Ya_4__  
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A CHRISTMAS SECRETARY
Last year the Frontier Nursing Service received over 2000  
presents for children, and with money sent by its friends bought  
1000 more. These gifts all had to be hauled in from the railroad
and redistributed over a large territory. All but three were
completely accounted for and promptly checked and acknowl-
edged. But we feel that the job is now too big to be
handled satisfactorily by our busy office force and nurses. We
have therefore this year a Christmas Secretary, who is giving A
her entire time to opening and checking the boxes and parcels, ,.
writing notes of acknowledgment and keeping a card file of all
names and addresses and the contents of all parcels. We hope ,|
very much that this will eliminate all confusion, duplication or  
omission. As the packages are opened, the contents are sorted  
according to the sex and ages of the children for whom they are i
intended, and then the exact number asked for by each nurse
for her own boys and girls and babies are loaded into wagons
and sent her. After that the job is hers.
“ We cannot begin to find the words in which to expres·s our
gratitude for everything.
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4 _—> _ FROZYTIER NLTRSINGASEQCEY MJ I
E 406 BARE FEET .
J We checked up personally on 3123 of our children in Novem- 2
  ber, and found 203 without shoes of any kind—about 6]/@$1.
Carrying the same figures over into the five million population
of the Appalachian range, and supposing them to be typical (a 4
fair assumption) one would get approximately 195,000 barefoot
or near-barefoot children. Conservatively one can estimate at
. least 150,000 children whose feet are inadequately protected
  from the winter weather as they trudge the stormy miles back
1 and forth to their one room schools.
It is the custom of the Frontier Nursing Service nurses ·to
have a yearly jollification on Thanksgiving Day. The staff now
numbers twenty, but only two-thirds can get in to Hyden for the
celebration, as one must always be on call at every center for the
deliveries. We choose Thanksgiving for our frolic because we
. are busy at the different stations with the children’s festivities
over Christmas. When the nurses come in on Thanksgiving they
I report just what their needs are going to be for their Christmas
  celebrations. Among other things they report their barefoot
Y children. It isn’t guesswork. They bring drawings of each pair
1 of little feet. This year we had as a guest the chairman of our
St. Louis Committee, and an order for shoes for all the children
was his immediate gift. _
While these words are written, boxes and barrels are com-
ing in from East and West with warm clothing and toys, and the
wholesale grocery houses in a number of cities, led by Bryan-
Hunt of Lexington, are supplying candy for 3,500 children.
Everything is under way to make Christmas a reality over about
j 500 square miles of rough mountain country. But it is only 500
square miles, and what of the thousands and thousands of chil-
ii dren all over the Appalachian range? What of the children over
` many other lonely sections in America? Here and there one finds
“ schools and church stations doing a royal part. Personally, we
have never been to one that wasn’t accomplishing a great deal

 4 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN _
under heavy odds and that didn’t deserve the support of all its {
h friends. But the economic need of our frontiers has not been
met up until now by any agency—and this includes our own.
Perhaps the market crash will bring home to the great  
cities some conception of the grind of poverty under which the ?
remote rural districts habitually struggle. Modern America is
geared only for an urban life. But some fifty million Ameri-
cans don’t live in cities. What of them? I
There is a family on Bull Creek where the mother died of
tuberculosis five years ago. A little later the nineteen-year-old A
son was dying of tuberculosis. We tried to get him in a state
sanitarium, but the waiting list was over two thousand. So he
died. Now the next son is dying of tuberculosis. Meantime A
the father has married again, a widow with several young chil-
_ dren. He has several of his own. They are all living in a two-
room house and some of them are sleeping in the bed with the
dying boy. We wanted to get the three youngest boys out to a
preventorium, but there isn’t, in the whole length and breadth of
America, a single preventorium that will take a mountain boy.
Every American city provides for the care of its tuberculars
and pre-tuberculars. None open their doors anywhere for the
1·ural child who does not live in their own counties. If anyone
doubts this statement let him write the National Organization
for Tuberculosis or any State Board of Health. Who is our
neighbor? Is it only he whose diseases would render us unsafe
because he lives in our community? Can’t our obligations be
stretched to include families beyond our own? `
We see the curious spectacle of the wealthiest nation in the
world sheltering at its heart the most extreme poverty. Is any-
one whole while there is sickness in one part of his body? No
pomp we can flaunt before the world is go·rgeous enough to hide {
our rags. The responsibility belongs to each one of us. The .
writer of these lines wears party slippers ($15.00 for a bit of  
brocade) when she knows children who lack shoes. Truly, we I
all are, as a great Englishman has said, only in "the rude fore-
shadowings of the civilization that is to come."
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l  Two most welcome guests who came to us this autumn were Mrs.
i Catherine Filene Dodd of Washington, D. C., and Major Julia C. Stimson,
Z, head of the Army Nurse Corps. Major Stimson has written the following `
words about her visit:
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? November 19, 1929. l
It’s very hard to express one’s impressions after a visit as
full of new sights, stirred emotions, and renewed admiration as
· was our visit to the Frontier Nursing Service. "It has to be
seen to be appreciated," is an old and hackneyed phrase, but it
‘ never was truer than about this Kentucky Mountain nursing
work. How can one describe the thickly wooded mountain
paths and the brilliant colors of the leaves or make clear the joy
of riding along the stream beds on a» sure-footed horse who so
knowingly picked his way over the rocks?
How can one bring before others the pity that filled the
heart at the sight of a worn and sad-faced young woman emerg-
· ing from a shack to hurry to the road to speak to Mrs. Breckin-
ridge—her nurse friend who could advise her and make plans
for her? No one who didn’t see it could realize the isolation and
loneliness and discouragement of the life of that young woman
up there on the side of that rainy mountain at least six mule-
back miles away from friends who could help. Little creeping
baby penned into the house by a chair across the door and hus- '
band working up in the woods all day weren’t very much help in
her condition.
As for admiration, no one in the Service wanted that and it
{ had to be suppressed, but what’s to be done with what one thinks
of nurses who, holding their personal somfort of no account, are
filled with enthusiasm about their life, their horses and long
night and day rides, their precious babies and grateful mothers,
their groups of children crowding into the small clinics for inoc-
if ulations and "pretties”?
  If out in the world one met a nurse who could deliver babies,
I superintend primitive carpenter work and well-digging, dose
and care for horses, advise about farming, teach untrained girls
cooking, live cheerfully by candlelight and with enamel basin and
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 6 THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN  
A pitcher bathing facilities, keep well and full of humor and com-
. mon sense, one would think the combination of all these quali-
ties was worthy of comment. And down there in that Nursing
Service seventeen or eighteen nurses were doing all these things
—and each one thought her particular center and her particular `
work and her particular patients were the very best. Such hu- ·
man girls they are, too, squealing over the candy from outside,
blushing with pride at the praise of a steamed pudding made
especially for the guests, eagerly grasping at the magic words
and music from the big cities coming in through the cleverly
rigged up radio. Read others’ reports of the records, the sys- ;
tem, the organization, the. use of the money and the convincing ‘
statistics. From me there is just this me-ssage: "Listen to Mary
Breckinridge tell about the work, then go and see for yourself."  
(Signed:) JULIA C. STIMSON,
Major, Army Nurse Corps, I
Superintendent.  
FIELD NOTES  
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Story of a Cow  
In the September bulletin we mentioned that the need for  
a cow for the babies at our hospital was urgent. Almost imme-  
diately we got a generous check from Mr. B. H. Kroger of Cin- I
cinnati. Within ten days a Holstein tuberculin-tested cow in l
the Blue Grass was on her way up to the mountains by express. l
She was coaxed gently in from the railroad, and We found to our  
delight that she continued to give her six gallons a day. She
replaces three cows which all combined did not give six, and she jj
only eats the food for one. Not only are the babies getting the `
best possible milk but we are saving two-thirds of the cost of
providing it. We named her after the month in which she came ,
to us—October.  
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 T . ’ AFRONT1EF?jE‘}i$}.¥§,§E}*"L@3,__.m-Aor   7
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A Gift Horse, in Whose Houth No One Need Look
Perhaps it was the description of Teddy Bear’s death in the
last bulletin which has led to another present. Mr. A. B. Glancy
` of Detroit, has just expressed down to us his beautiful Ken-
· tucky saddle horse, Glen. Nothing in all our stables, which now
include twenty-four head, is quite so fine. He came in to us
when the thermometer hovered near zero and stepped across the
icy roads and streams with the sure touch of one coming into his
kingdom. Perhaps we exaggerate the affection we feel for our
; horses, but after all they are our companions, and our only com-
` panions, through the long winter months over the lonely trails.
\ It would be hard to exaggerate either their devotion or our con-
T fidence.
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j The Caroline Butler Atwood Center
This charming new center is practically finished, and the
nurses have been living there since early in November. We
E have never had a more responsive district than this territory
E where Flat Creek flows into Red Bird River, and for miles
, around. To substantiate this statement the following almost
i unbelievable figures, which are literally and exactly true, are
l given. In the first two months and two days after the work
{ opened up in that district under Miss Peacock and Miss Wille-
3 ford, they gave 3,086 typhoid and T. A. T. shots, and 483 in one
l day. People came on mules and on horses and in wagons from
l as far as fifteen miles away. `
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I The Seventh Center
‘ We are happy to be able to announce the gift from Mrs.
Hiram W. Sibley of Rochester and New York, of a nursing
center in memory of her Kentucky mother, Margaret Durbin
2 Harper.
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 3 THE QUARTERLY BULLICTIN 7
TRUSTEES IN KENTUCKY OF
THE FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE, Inc.
4)
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. o'
Executive Board ,
Clmlrnmn S
Mrs. S, Thruston Ballard, Louisville
\'iec·Clmirmen
l Mrs. S. C. Henning, Cherokee Park, Louisville
Judge Edward O'Rear, Frankfort
Treasurer
Mr. C. N. Manning, Security Trust Company, Lexington
Recording Secretary
· Mrs. XV. H. Coffman, Georgetown
Corresponding.: Secretary
Mrs. Joseph Carter, Versailles
Mrs. A. J. A. Alexander, Spring Station
Dr. Scott Breckinriclge, Lexington
Dr. Josephine Hunt. Lexington
Mrs. Preston Johnston. Fayette County
Mr. E. S. Jouett. Louisville
Mrs. Frank l\Ic\'ey, Lexington
Miss Linda Neville, Lexington
Mr. Bethel B. \'eet·h, Louisville
Chairmen and Vice Chairmen District Committees
Judge XVilliam Dixon, \Vooton Judge and Mrs. L. D. Lewis, Hyden
Mr. \Va.lter Hoskins. Hyden Mr. Sherman Cook. Asher
}.lrs, Taylor Morgan, \\’endover Mr. Boy