xt7xgx44sb11 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xgx44sb11/data/mets.xml The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. 1967 bulletins  English The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletins Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 42, No. 4, Spring 1967 text Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 42, No. 4, Spring 1967 1967 2014 true xt7xgx44sb11 section xt7xgx44sb11 VOLUME 42 SPRING, I967 NUMBER 4
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THE HORSE BARN AT WENDOVER

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The cover drawing was done by l
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Patricia Sweney, a 1967 courier from ; l
Concord, Massachusetts. While Pat Q}
was with us she taught a weekly art E g
class for interested youngsters on the f
Wendover district. I
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FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE QUARTERLY BULLETIN
Published at the end of each Quarter by the Frontier Nursing Service, Inc.
Lexington, Ky, ,
Subscription Price $1.00 a Year
l·Idit0r’s Oilice: \Vendove1·, Kentucky
VOLUME 42 SPRING, 1967 NUMBER 4 .
Second class Postage paid at Lexington, Ky. 40507
Send Form 3579 to Frontier Nursing Service, Wcndover. Ky, 41775 _
C··;·yi·iglit. 1967. Frontier Nursing Service, Inc.

  4
CONTENTS
l ——
l ARTICLE AUTHOR P AGE
E Beyond the Mountains 37
A ! Field Notes 42
*   In Memoriam 17
  j Invocation to Youth (Verse) Laurence Binyon 2
L Mary Breckinridge Hospital
' Progress Report H.E.B. 15
l I Old Courier News 21
{ Old Staff News 27
` Our Mail Bag 20
l   The Extra Mile (Illus.) Mabel Rusher r 3
3 j The Horse Barn From The
j X "Blossom Patch" A Photograph Inside Back Cover
E   Urgent Needs 5
E \ Variety Is the Spice . . . Marie Sullivan 25
l ,
` BRIEF BITS
I I Faith, Hope . . . and Credit The Colonial Crier 40
i Fence Builder The Countryman 34 l
   , Gloucestershire Man . . . The Countryman 33
  Information, Please ‘600’ Magazine 47
y   Lost and Found 41
- 2 Sayings of Our Children 34
i Sayings of Our Chi1dren—Schoo1 Daze 36
‘   Those Stones of Good Magic The Colonial Crier 36
Traiiic Oiiicer . . . Modern Maturity 34
i White Elephant 35
Q

 2 FRoNTmR NURSING SERVICE ____  
l
 
l
INVOCATION TO YOUTH  
Come lhen, as ever. lil’    
i   ’ 1.* I  , E  nsf
gg     { 
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. :—*¤r  :4-  » ,;  
  Flin *    I .»'   U’E:`  
  Z Y ,_x`     i
    It was a cold, gray winter day as I stood outside the house
  where Polly Jones lived, and the sky would soon be darkening
, above the snowpatched mountains. After a long delay the door
fé creaked open a few inches, and I saw the wrinkled, coal-smudged
M face of Polly herself peering cautiously out at me. When I re-
i gained my composure, I explained that I was her new nurse and
; had come to visit her after hearing that she had hurt her arm.
l‘ Earlier in the afternoon I had made a routine visit in a
X home at the Mouth of Long Branch and had inquired about the
I ,_ families that lived deep in the hollow. {At iirst my in.formant
vl stated that to her knowledge everyone was well. Then, on further
questioning, she recalled that about a week previously Polly had
fallen when a step on her porch had broken beneath her weight.
Polly’s arm was swollen as a result of the fall, so the neighbor
) had given her some ointment for it and then heard no more from
.,  her. Since it was getting late, I almost decided not to go to the
‘ trouble of making the hike up the hollow, but something told
· me I should.

 I
4 FRONTIER NURSING smnvicn  
While passing from the outside light into the darkness be- ?
yond the door, I got a glimpse of Polly. A snatch of dull gray E
hair fell from the dingy scarf knotted behind her head. Her  
clothes, dark with coal dust, hung loosely on her long, thin bones.  
Then my gaze fell on the arm carefully held in a ragged scarf- it
sling. Polly winced with pain as she moved her arm for my  
examination. Her hand was puffed up like a balloon, and there jf
was a hard knot of bone fragments on her forearm where a long  
smooth bone should have been. She had one of the worst frac-  
tures I had ever seen! While making a splint with a magazine, Q
I explained that her arm was broken and that she would have if
to go to a doctor to have a cast applied. She staunchly insisted F
that her arm did not give her much pain and that she would be pi,
all right. However, before I left I got her promise that she would ,
go with a neighbor to see a doctor early the next morning since  
she insisted it was too late to go that day. L ,_p_ —
The following morning was bright and sunny. The melting
snow was iilling the mountain streams and a cardinal could be
heard chirping contentedly. That afternoon as I drove by the I
Mouth of Long Branch, I stopped to see if Polly had been by I
on her way to see a doctor. She had not. My heart sank. Again *
I made the hike deep into the hollow and found Polly at home, Z_
slumped in front of her coal stove. Eventually she confided that  
she had seen a doctor only once before in her life and was afraid *
to go again. However, with much reassurance she agreed to go
if I would take her. So we started off down the path by the little I
mountain stream. Polly was terrified by the jeep ride that fol- _
lowed and clung to my skirt for all she was worth. As we drove  
along she disclosed that the day before, when she had opened her ‘.
door and had seen me standing there, she had thought I was  
her little girl, dead now for years, who had grown up and come .·
back to help her. I drove on in silence.  I.
Polly got a bright white cast and a new, clean sling. It was V
dark by the time we got back to Long Branch but her neighbors  l
were there waiting with iiashlights—both to see Polly’s cast and V
to help her walk back up the hollow. I wondered what would
have happened if I had decided Polly’s case was not worth look-  I
ing into. Polly had taught me the difference that going "the extra  °
mile" can make. `

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F
E QUARTERLY BULLETIN 5
Ll URGENT NEEDS
»
gw. Our readers will rejoice with us in that, for the first time in
  years, the Hyden Hospital water system is not included in Urgent ’
`_ Needs! This is because we continue to get an ample supply of
$¤_ water from the Biggerstaff mine in which we impounded the
_; water in 1965. Furthermore, Hyden’s application for a municipal
T water system and a sewage disposal plant have been approved.
j1 This means that when the Mary Breckinridge Hospital is built,
Q we can connect it with the city systems.
  It has been a very expensive year: prices are up, wages are
· higher, our properties are older; and the battle to control move-
<·'¢ ment on the Wendover hillside is ever present with us! Our friends
gp. in the mountains and beyond the mountains have been wonderful
  this past year in giving generously to the support of the work.
··l· 1 We have kept solvent! We shall welcome your gifts—large and
small—towards meeting this list of Urgent Needs.
p HYDEN HOSPITAL PLANT
· This consists of a number of buildings located on 41.15 acres
;_ of land, on a spur of Thousandsticks Mountain. The principal
E buildings are the Hospital and Annex; Margaret Voorhies Haggin
* Quarters for Nurses; Mardi Cottage (quarters for the Frontier
. Graduate School of Midwifery); St. Christopher’s Chapel; Joy
F House; Bolton House; an oak barn; employees’ cottage; Betty’s
A Box; and smaller buildings. Some of the most u1·gent needs for `
l i this boundary are listed below:
lj 1. FIRE ESCAPE OFF WARDS: wooden structure
iq replaced with concrete platform, metal steps and
 ;` . handrails, as recommended by fire marshall-
 f materials and labor .....................__.__..._,.______________________ $1,268,48
 1 2. OFFICES ON FIRST FLOOR RE-ARRAN GED: to
accommodate additional administrative and cleri-
H cal staff necessary to handle Medicare Program
 e paper work. This includes:
 i Pantry Converted to Cubbyliole Oflice and
` Space for Files:——materials and labor __________________ 235_()()
  L .

 S.
0 FRONTIER NURSING smwxcm
X-ray Laboratory and Teclmician’s Office:
stainless steel sink installed in a built-in cabinet  
with formica top; and shelves and cupboards ·
built for supplies-materials and labor-esti- ,
mated ................................ . ..........,.............................. 500.00  
Partition Wall in Business Office: materials and .
labor ...................................,....................................... 88.00 li
Linoleum Laid in 2 Offices: (Medical Director’s Q
and Medical Records Office)-46 sq. yds. laid @ W
$7.00 per sq. yd ......................................................... 322.00  
Note: We shall welcome a gift of one square  
yard! >·.j
3. OFFICE FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT: L
Desks: new, small metal (typist)
-2 @ $ 39.95 each-$ 79.90 _
used, in excellent condition
-2 @ $ 65.00 each-$130.00 ‘
-1 @ $125.00 each-$125.00
-1 @ $ 45.00 each-$ 45.00 379.90
Metal Storage Cabinet: desk-high to
hold copying machine and supplies ........ $ 55.00 _
Stationery Trays for Desks:
2 @ $9.50 each- 19.00
2 @ $3.60 each- 7.20
3 @ $2.20 each- 6.60  
Desk Organizer: for distributing incom- g
ing mail ........................................................ 39.95  
Adding Machine: hand-operated .............. 169.00  I
Typewriter: .................................................. 149.00 1
Wooden Rack: (locally made) -for (
Medical Director’s professional maga- ·
zines for easy reference .............................. 25.00
Typist Chairs: used, in excellent condi- ~
tion-2 @ $15.00 each .............................. 30.00 500.75 ·

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QUARTERLY BULLETIN 7
4. BETTER LIGHTING INSTALLED THROUGH-
  OUT HOSPITAL: additional wiring in conduit;
· and fixtures——materials and labor—-estimated ........ $1,000.00
i 5. REPAIR OF PLASTER AND PAINTING: as
` needed throughout Hospital—materials and labor
i —estimated ........................,........,................................. 1,000.00
  6. SICK BABIES’ NURSERY: small sink (on hand)
Q installed in cabinet; and shelves and individual
4 cubbyholes for clothes built above it-—materials
ig; and labor-—estimated ._..__........................,,................... 100.00
J; 7. WARDS-UTILITY ROOM: sub-flooring patched,
_’ plywood installed and linoleum laid—materials
  and labor ...._................................................................... 140.20
Q 8. INSTRUMENT STERILIZER FOR MATERNITY
WARD: .......................................................................... 150.00
9. OPTHALMOSCOPE AND OTOSCOPE: for use by
A doctors ........................................................................... 85.25
‘ 10. OTOSCOPES: for ear examinations by district
nurses—5 @ $39.95 each .......................................... 199.75
11. EXTREMITY OPERATING TABLE: complete with
stainless steel washing pan and cushion .................. 179.50
12. SUCTION MACHINE: for very sick patients with
R abdominal obstructions, ulcers, etc.———quoted @ .... 255.00
13. KITCHEN CUPBOARD: locally made—materials
and labor——estimated .................................................. 75.00
} 14. WOODEN STOOLS FOR CLINIC: (MTD students)
  5 @ $9.85 each ............................................................ 49.25
Q 15. CHAIR FOR BUSINESS OFFICE: quoted @ .......... 40.00
Q 16. CHART HOLDER: locally made-—materials and
 I labor ............................................................................... 25.00
 ' 17. REFRIGERATOR FOR HOSPITAL KITCHEN:
— 17-cu. ft. size .................................................._..........___ 275.00
I 18. BIOLOGICAL REFRIGERATOR: for storage of
' blood, etc ...................................._,.,..._....._,___.________________ 199,95
19. AIR CONDITIONER FOR OPERATING ROOM:
· window unit installed ._.....___._______________________________________ 271,40
· 20. ALUMINUM AMBULANCE STRETCHER VVITH
q, ‘ ADJUSTABLE LEGS: quoted @ __....________________________ 212,00

 s FRoN·1·1ER Noasmc. smnvicm
MARGARET VOORHIES HAGGIN QUARTERS »
FOR NURSES
1. REFRIGERATOR: 17-cu. ft.——replacing unit not —
repairable ..._...........<............. . ......................................... $ 310.00 [
2. SUITE AND TWO BEDROOMS PAINTED: materi-
als and labor ....,............................................................. 101.43 ‘
3. HOLLYWOOD BEDS: replacing those that are old,
sagging and bad for backs—3 complete beds  
(frames, box springs and innerspring mattresses) 3
@ $45.00 each .............................................................. 135.00 l
Note: Manufacturer and local dealer give us this .I
special price. K,
4. PLATFORM ROCKERS: for bedrooms—2-·quoted
@ $50.00 each .............................................................. 100.00 1
5. UNBLEACHED SHEETING: 100 yds. @ 25c per  `
yd .................................................................................... 25.00
MARDI COTTAGE  
Quarters for Frontier Graduate School of Midwifery
1. FUEL CONTROL FOR OIL FURNACE: installed .... $ 42.50 .
2. WATER SUPPLY LINE: corroded pipe (cutting .3
down pressure)—replaced—-materials and labor .... 45.45  (
3. LIVING ROOM AND TWO BEDROOMS PAINTED:
materials and labor ...................................................... 68.60
4. PIANO TUNED: .............._.....__..____________.......____.__....__.... 15.00  _l_
JOY HOUSE  
Helen Newberry Joy  
1. HAND BASIN: fittings not available for old type  ,
basin—new basin, fittings and labor ........................ $ 41.43
2. BATHROOM PAINTED: materials and labor .......... 48.00 .
BOLTON HOUSE A
Gift of Frances P. Bolton i
1. AIR CONDITIONER—1st FLOOR: (circuit already
in)—window unit ............................................_... · ....____ $ 248.00  i
1

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN s
· 2. SEPTIC TANK: (bad slip in road destroyed septic
tank) ; new steel tank and drain field laid to meet
. State Health requirements—equipment, materials
{ and labor .............r..__.._........................r........................ 557.47
3. ALUMINUM SIDING INSTALLED OVER DROP
· SIDING: paint is peeling badly——painting would
require considerable scraping, sanding and caulk-
¤ p ing to insure a good job. Factory painted alumi-
*" num siding over old siding would insulate house
3 and be maintenance-free for many years—siding
g and labor—estimated .................,......_.......................... 1,500.00
  4. DRAINAGE—WET WEATHER SPRING IN
` BASEMENT: confine spring in concrete drain
» around wall and pipe it outside-cement and labor
_ —estimated ..,,..,_.........._........,......._............................... 50.00
x 5. STAIR HANDRAIL: rail and labor ............................ 22.45
Q 6. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS—3: for Class "A", "B"
H and "C" fires ...................................._......_.................... 72.15
7. ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT: separate circuit run for
—_ doctor to install her air conditioner upstairs—-ma-
» terials and labor ......................................................___. 11.28
WENDOVER
 l 1. REPAIR OF ROCK WALLS DUE TO WINTER ‘
  FREEZES FOLLOWED BY HEAVY SPRING
`, RAINS; AND DRAINAGE TO CONTROL MORE
%_ CRACKS:
 ~ Retaining Wall and Rock Walk (Chapel
4 to Big Log House): wall re-laid; flag-
stones in walk reset—cement and labor..$248.92
` Retaining Wall Opposite Garden House:
» (supports driveway)—disintegrated
chestnut logs replaced by concrete blocks
i and cement; (In doing this, we widened
the driveway for more parking space.)—
 i materials and labor .............................._,__._ 613,60
1

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io F1>.oN·rmR Nunsmo smtvrcm *
Lower Cistern: repairing three large
cracks and filling in around cistern with
rock and cement where earth was washed _
out—materials and labor .......................... 325.37  
Drainage Aroimd Lower Gistern, Upper
Shelf and Above Big House: to collect
water in surface drains and culvert pipes
and carry it off the hillside into nearby , p
branch (to check further damage by ‘
water to cistern, retaining walls, build- ‘
ings, et cetera)—150’ surface drains and ,_;
76’ culvert pipe required-—-materials and , {
1abor—estimated .............,...,......_.._............. 400.00 $1,587.89
2. RENOVATING VARIOUS BUILDINGS:
(by our men in bad weather) includes re-
pairs, caulking; scraping and stripping
woodwork; and painting:
Garden House Basement: (recreation
room, laundry, boiler room, et cetera)——
materials and labor ......,.........._.................. 518.34
Garden House Rooms: 4-offices and bed-
rooms—materials and labor .............,...... 125.00
Cabin: 1-large bedroom and bathroom .
(includes replacing warped beaver board pl
with sheetrock)—-materials and labor .... 177.60 ’]
Big Log House: living room, upstairs  
hallway (woodwork) and ofIice—materi- 1
als and labor ................... ; ............................ 179.06 1,000.00
3. LOG HORSE BARN—'1‘RE'A'1‘ED FOR
TERMITES: contract .................................................. 322.20
4. JEEP PORT: insulated overhead to make offices and I
bedrooms above warmer—materials and labor ...... 71.95  
f
5. BIG LOG HOUSE ROOF: (over kitchen) old roofing  §
 
i

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QUARTERLY BULLETIN 11
and sheathing replaced and new walk and steps
built over roof—materials and labor ........................ 153.68
. 6. LOWER SHELF COAL BIN: old wooden, warped
‘ bin replaced with concrete blocks and cement-
materials and labor ...................................................... 221.00
7. BIG LOG HOUSE—FURNACE AND STOKER:
furnace sealed and re-set; new retorts put in
1 Q stoker—parts and labor .............................................. 140.23
· 8. REVOLVING CHIMNEY CAPS: 6—various sizes .... 66.00
··} 9. LOCUST POSTS: for repair of boundary line and
il pasture fences throughout Service—211 @ 600
each ................................................................................ 126.60
10. BLOWER FOR CLEANING HEATING SYSTEMS
AND REFRIGERATION UNITS: heavy-duty-—
used, excellent condition .............................._......_______ 30.00
11. FIRE HOSE: 1—50' section-2" .....,.........................._. 25.00
12. INSULATED MEAT CHEST: for couriers’ use in
transporting meat and frozen vegetables from Hy-
den to Wendover (made by our men)—materials .
and labor ........................................................................ 49.93
13. BIG LOG HOUSE—LIVlNG ROOM CHAIR: maple
` chair repaired, sanded and refinished by our men
.1 —-materials and labor ..................................____________   25,70 -
7 14. ALL—WOOL BLANKETS: (special price) 24 @
  $6.00 each .......................... ; ............................_..____________ 148,40
1 15. BEDSPREADS: 24 @ $4.85 each ................._._.___._______ 116.40
16. FLOOR FANS: 4 @ $ 6.95 each (on sale) .-.- ..... 27.80
1 @ 14.95 " .......................... 14.95
1 @ 19.95 " .......................... 19.95 62.70
i 17. LARGE BREAD BOX: for kitchen _..___________________________ 10_95
  18. BIG LOG HOUSE—OFFICE CHAIR MATS: to pro-
 Q tect new linoleum-2 " $7.70 each ....._._______________________ 15_40
{

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12 FRONTIER NURSING smzvicm  
19. POWER AUGER: to use at Wendover and the out-
post centers in unblocking drain pipes. It will in
most cases eliminate necessity of cutting out iioor ,_
to get to old type drain pipes——quoted @ ....,........... 164.00
JEEPS
One new jeep is badly needed to replace a 5-year-old
one which is now requiring expensive repairs. ,
1-New J eep—after trade-in of old jeep——approximately--$2,000.00 1 
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0 BEECH FORK NURSING CENTER}  
Jessie Preston Draper Memorial  _
1. W A T E R S Y S T E' M-PRESSURE TANK IN-
STALLED: tank, fittings, controls and labor-  _
estimated. .......... I ............................................................ $ 100.00
Note: This tank, for pump now in use, will be  
cheaper than a new cypress storage tank.
2. HEATING SYSTEM: install two electric heat pump
units—contract price——quoted @ ....,....................... 1,500.00 Y
Note: Essential parts for our old hot air fur-
nace are no longer available. At its best, ·
the furnace didn’t adequately heat the
clinic and waiting room in severe weather.
The cost of a new hot air system would be ` ’
about the same as that quoted for the E
heat pumps, which would heat the whole 1
house without supplementary heat now  ·
needed for the clinic and waiting room;
and the operating cost would be about the
same as for the present heating system.
3. UTILITY ROOM: (converting small room next to
kitchen)—running circuits for washer, dryer and
iron; installing galvanized laundry tubs; and put-
ting linoleum on floor——materials and 1abor——esti- _
mated .......................................................................______ 150,00 y

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§
l QUARTERLY BULLETIN 13
4. REFRIGERATOR: replaces one for which parts
were no longer available—cost, less trade-in of old
._ refrigerator .............,................................,.............,...... 200.00
5. KITCHEN CABINET: new one built to fit space for
it—materials and labor—estimated .......................... 100.00
The nurses would love pictures suitable for their small sit-
ting room.
q` BRUTUS NURSING CENTER
* Belle Barrett Hughitt Memorial ( `
Q 1. LIVING ROOM AND HALLWAY FLOORS: splin-
·"! tered original pine flooring replaced with prefin-
‘ ished hardwood—materials and 1abor—estimated.-$ 200.00
— . 2. COFFEE TABLE AND TWO END TABLES: for
. living room—quoted @ .............................................. 96.63
 . 3.BREAKFAST TABLE AND CHAIRS FOR
KITCHEN: quoted @ .................................................. 39.95
1 4. FOOD MIXER: quoted @ .................................._..._._... 28.97
V Large picture for living room (about 24" x 36") for
wall over sofa.
A FLAT CREEK NURSING CENTER 7
Caroline Butler Atwood Memorial `
' NONE
_ RED BIRD NURSING CENTER `
` I Clara Ford
 ( 1. ENLARGING CLINIC: closing in porch off waiting
. room, making room for both nurses. to see patients
I at the same time. Carpentry, painting, heating and
I lighting—materials and labor ................................._.. $ 952.72
2. CLINIC ADDITION—FURNISHINGS:
Examining table (locally made) ................ $30.00
Desk (locally made) .................................... 65.00
Shelves for supplies ...................................... 15.00
Examining light ............................................ 25.00
Curtain material ............................................ 10.00 145.00

 14 FRONTIER NURSING smavicr.
3.  IC RANGE: replacing old range requiring i
extensive repairs .......................................................... 192.00
4. REFRIGERATOR: ..................._........................,............ 239.00 i
5. KITCHEN CABINETS: 2—made by nurse in off- _ _ ·
duty time—materials only .....,..................._................ 40.26
6. LIVING ROOM FLOOR: sanded and refinished——
contract ................................ . ......................................... 54.00 _ V
7. PATIENTS’ LAVATORY: install hand basin——ma- ,
terials and labor—estimated ...................................... 50.00 lil
. Ti
WOLF CREEK NURSING CENTER *1;
Margaret Durbin Harper Memorial ·
1. PAINTING CENTER»EXTERIOR: materials and
labor ............................................................................... $ 538.70
The center had not been painted since it was
built in 1959. We had to paint it last summer.
We "robbed Peter to pay Paul"; will someone
please enable us to pay Peter! -
2. PAINTING LIVING ROOM AND DINING AREA:
materials and labor—estimated ...................._.__________ 50,00
3. CLINIC CUPBOARD WITH FORMICA TOP AND
SLIDING DOORS: nurses badly need more space
for clinic set-up and storage of supplies—materials
and labor—estimated .................................................. 250.00
4. BREAKFAST TABLE AND 4-CHAIRS: quoted @ 39.95
5. STAINLESS STEEL FLATWARE: service for
eight—qu0ted @ ............................................._____..______ 29,95 ,
6. BOX SPRINGS AND MATTRESSES: for nurses’ ·
rooms (manufacturer gives us special price)-
2 sets @ $40.00 each ........................,_,..,.....,,..._,...__.__ 80.00

 QUARTERLY BULLE·r1N 15
MARY BRECKINRIDGE HOSPITAL
I Progress Report
` ‘ Members of the FNS Development Committee are:
C0-Chairmen : ·
, Mr. Brooke Alexander, New York, New York
· Miss Kate Ireland, Cleveland, Ohio
, Mrs. Charles W. Allen, Jr., Louisville, Kentucky
.·, Mrs. Morris Cheston, Ambler, Pennsylvania
,’  Mrs. Richard Higgins, Dedham, Massachusetts
A;4 Miss Jane Leigh Powell, New York, New York
il Mr. and Mrs. William W. Wotherspoon, Grosse Pointe
Farms, Michigan
Ex-officio:
Mrs. J efferson Patterson, Washington, D. C.
Miss Helen E. Browne, Wendover, Kentucky
Advisor :
Dr. 5Francis S. Hutchins, Berea, Kentucky
Mr. Henry R. Heyburn, Louisville, Kentucky
The local fund drive being conducted in the mountain area
has surpassed its initial goal. One baby is sitting on top of the
ladder outside the Court House in Leslie County, showing
$25,000.00 has. been deposited in the bank. A twin baby is already
on the first rung of the ladder, hoping to reach the top, to help
build the Mary Breckinridge Hospital.
Mr. Wynn Bussman, our resident director of development .
from the Erm of Marts & Lundy, came to Wendover in early
March to help us make preparations for "screening" meetings
A in twelve cities where we have organized committees. The
purpose of these meetings was to gather information for our
l Development Committee who have to set a realistic goal for
our campaign. "Screening" is not easy and we are deeply grate-
ful to the many FNS friends who have so willingly helped us in
this difficult task. The meetings took place in April and May.
Kate Ireland and Wynn Bussman undertook the meetings in
I Louisville, Cleveland, and Cincinnati. Helen Browne and Wynn
Bussman were in New York and Philadelphia. All three were at
, the Boston meeting and Helen Browne went to Washington. The
Blue Grass Committee held the last of the "screening" meetings

 16 Fnourmn NU1>.s1N<; SERVICE
in Lexington on May 19. It was attended by Kate Ireland and
Helen Browne. Mr. Bussman will be compiling a composite report
for each city. Marts & Lundy have assigned the writing of the
FNS story, or "case" as the professionals term it, to one of their
staff members. We hope to have the finished article ready for
distribution in June.
As this Bulletin goes to press we are getting ready for a
Leadership Conference at Wendover. Trustees and friends from
beyond the mountains are coming to Wendover immediately after 6
the Annual Meeting in Lexington on May 31. We have planned l
visits to outpost centers and the hospital on Thursday, June 1.  
That evening the women of our Hyden Committee will prepare  
and serve dinner to all visitors. To this dinner will be invited ’
local friends to meet the guests and to take part in the planning
conference after dinner. y
The FNS has a contract with Vision Associates, Inc. of New
York for the production of a sound motion picture of the work.
Mr. Lee Bobker, President of Vision Associates, his assistant,
and his crew of camera and sound men, spent the week of May 1
in the field, taking pictures and recording sound. We are all
looking forward to the finished product which will be ready by V
early fall.
Our former Medical Director, Dr. W. B. Rogers Beasley, has
written a proposal for a school of district nursing which is
included in our plans for the future. We shall hope to discuss
the proposal with professional groups later in the year.
One of our goals is to set up a retirement fund for the staff J
who have devoted so many years of their lives to the FNS. Our  
readers will rejoice with us that we have received a generous _]
legacy which has been designated for a retirement fund. The  ·
response to requests for leadership gifts is. very encouraging.
We are delighted to be able to announce that pledges for such
gifts now amount to half a million dollars. Our Development
Committee plans to launch their campaign for funds during the
coming fall and winter. This Committee will prepare a more —
formal report to be included in the next issue of our Quarterly ,
Bulletin.
H. E. B.

 QUARTERLY BULLETIN 17
MRS. BUCKNER W. ANDERSON MRS. WILLIAM M. HAUPT
Cincinnati, Ohio New York, New York
Died in April, 1967 Died in September, 1966
MRS.ROBERT MIDDLETON BAGBY · MRS. W. A. HIFNER, JR.
Lexington, Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky
Died in December, 1966 Died in April, 1967
I MR. PAUL G. BLAZER MR. ROY ARTHUR HUNT
·7 Ashland, Kentucky Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
1 Died in December, 1966 Died in October, 1966
ii DR. JAMES W. BRUCE MISS MARY E. JOHNSTON
  Louisville, Kentucky Glendale, Ohio
l Died in March, 1967 Died in February, 1967
MR. JOHN HARRIS CLAY, SR. MRS. GEORGE ARTHUR LUMB
Paris, Kentucky Providence, Rhode Island
V Died in March, 1967 Died in Autumn, 1966
MRS. JOHN W. DAVIDGE MRS. RICHARD H. PREWI'I'I‘
Washington, D. C. Wayne, Pennsylvania
Died in April, 1967 Died in December, 1966
MISS MABEL LINDSAY GILLESPIE MR. GRANVILLE RICE
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Saul, Kentucky
Died in April, 1967 Died in May, 1967
MRS. CUTHBERT R. TRAIN
' Washington, D. C.
Died in January, 1967
Death, be not roucl. thou h some have called thee
P 9
Mighty and clreacltul, tor thou art not so:
For those whom thou thinl<'st thou dost overthrow
J Die not, poor Death; . . . Why swelI`st thou then? ‘
  One short sleep past. we wake eternally,
i And Death shall be no more: Death, thou shalt clie!
 . ——Jolm Donne
Mrs. Robert Middleton Bagby was an Emeritus member of
our Board of Governors at the time of her death in Lexington,
Kentucky. We can think of no one more deserving of the title.
` Caroline Steele Bagby was a charter member of the Frontier
~ Nursing Service and one of the small group that gathered in
Frankfort, Kentucky, in May 1925 when the FNS was officially
born. Her whole-hearted support of the work and her many
· kindnesses to the staff will long be remembered. Another dis-
i

 18 FRoN·r1ER Nunsmo smnvron
tinguished Kentuckian who honored us by serving as a Trustee
was Mr. Paul G. Blazer of Ashland. Not only was he a success-
ful businessman but an outstanding civic leader in the Common-
wealth of Kentucky. It was at his winter home in Phoenix, Ari-
zona, that he died f