xt7xgx44ts6n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xgx44ts6n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19661026  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 26, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 26, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7xgx44ts6n section xt7xgx44ts6n Pritchard, Blackwell Clash Over Charter
By

JOHN ZEH

grandchildren, but it's not alright for my grandchildren, my children, or me!"
The heated exchange climaxed the political
union's first debate at the College of Law moot
court room this year. Four University students
also participated.
Blackwell, vice president of the Kentucky Association for Trial Lawyers, said it is generally
agreed that much of the proposed charter's effectiveness would depend on interpretation. "There
is doubt what it will do," he said, "there is
doubt it is proper. And what do you do when
you are in doubt? You don't sign a contract or
convict a man."
"But this constitution is not on criminal trial,
so the argument of reasonable doubt docs not
apply," Pritchard replied. "This doubt you speak
of is a camouflage, a smokescreen" of unjust
and illogical criticism.
Continued On rage 8

Kernel Associate Editor
Kentucky trial lawyer arguing the case
against the proposed new constitution said Tuesday night the revision should he defeated
there is too much doubt about it.
A

he-cau-

The defense also had its day in court though,
and swayed a jury of Kentucky Political Union
spectators, who found in favor of the revised
charter,
"This constitution thing is too big to be
accepted at one time," argued Freeman V.
83-7-

Black-wel-

Louisville.

EDWARD PRITCHARD

l,

"The most orderly way to (change)

is by amending. This can be done."
"By amendment? Why, it would take 100
years to get a decent constitution by amendment,"
retorted Ed Pritchard, Frankfort attorney in favor
of the new charter. "That's alright for my great

f

I:

I

i!?

FREEMAN V. BLACKWELL

University Files

Suit To Acquire
Motel Property

The University Board of Trustees Tuesday asked Fayette County
Court to condemn two motels and other property needed for an
expansion of the University.
The property in question was the Center Motel, the Town
House Motel and adjacent properties lying between Rose and
Limestone streets near their junction.
Robert Kerley, vice president for business administration, said
the area was needed to provide immediate office space for the
University Medical Center and to provide a site for later expansion
of the Medical Center and the Agricultural Sciences complex. He
said the property has been appraised at $775,000.
The board filed two condemnation actions in the court.
One named as defendants the Center Corp., which owns part
of the property and operates the Center Motel; and the National
Toddle House Corp., which leases restaurant space in the motel;
Hyman Rosenberg and Max Sapoznick, who lease quarters adjoining the motel; and Commonwealth Life Insurance Co. and the
Second National Bank and Trust Co., which hold mortgages on
the property.
The other suit lists as defendants Mr. and Mrs. Solly W. Hall
and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Cole, owners of the Town House Motel;
and First Federal Savings and Loan Assoc., which has a mortgage
on the property.
Craddy Johnson, county judge pro tern, signed routine orders
declaring that the petition showed need for condemnation, because
the University had attempted to purchase the property and needed
it "to expand the University's plant and extend its usefulness."
Judge Johnson appointed three commissioners to fix the value
of the property for the court. These commissioners are E. I. Thompson, Thompson J. Carnes and Richard T. Mayes.
Under general condemnation procedures, the commissioners set
the value of the property and the county judge issues an order
awarding that amount to the owners.
The case can be appealed to Fayette Circuit Court if either
party is dissatisfied with the set amount. In the circuit court
a jury will hear evidence and fix the amount to be paid.

Vol. 58, No. 40

University of Kentucky
1966
OCT.

LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY,

for Nov. 9. Both are free on bond.

Lexington police identified the
two as Mrs. Susan S. Hohnke,
22, a medical technician in the
Department of Medicine, and
Tom Piercefield, 23, a part-tim- e
technical assistant. Their arrests
were the fourth and fifth on
narcotics charges since Sunday.

Lexington Detective Frank
Fryman, who made the arrests
with Kentucky narcotic agent
Richard Snowden, said the alleged violation occurred Oct. 10.
Specific determination of the drug
had not been made, but it was
and messuspected that LSD-2caline were involved.
5

University Vice President
Glen wood Creech said both Mrs.
Hohnke and Piercefield have been
fired for misuse of University facilities. Piercefiled, also a part-tim- e
student, was suspended from
school pending a review of his

case by the Student Government
Judicial Board.
Three

University

students

were arrested Sunday on the alleged possession of marijuana.

By FRANK BROWNING
Kernel Associate Editor
Location of the University

football stadium

is

neither a dead

nor a forgotten issue, according
to three University trustees.
Dr. Ralph Angelucci, chairman of the Trustees' Executive
Committee, said Tuesday he
knew nothing of rumors that the
stadium question might be brushed over and dropped.
"That (the rumor) may be
true, but as of now I don't
think so," he added.
All three members, including
Smith Broadbent of Cadiz, and
Robert Hillenmeyer of Lexington pointed out that a final decision on the stadium site is
dependent on studies to be presented the Board this year.
(The University has engaged
a traffic consultant firm to study
the advantages and disadvantages of the four proposed loca- -

Their attorney, Roger Sledd, filed
a motion Tuesday with Commissioner Leslie Morris asking that
newsmen be excluded from a preliminary hearing set for his clients
on Nov. 14.

The suspension of

a University student arrested Tuesday for
possession of narcotics does not emanate solely from his
arrest, Vice President for Student Affairs Robert Johnson said
today.
Johnson said he suspended dent Government Judicial Board,
Johnson said.
stuTom Piercefield, a part-tim- e
from classes for misusing
dent,
The vice president would not
University facilities.
elaborate on the alleged misPiercefield, also a part-tim- e
use of UK property. He said
technical assistant at the Medi- the Judicial Board "will be sumcal Center, has been dismissed
moned as quickly as practical"
from that position on the same to make a recommendation con-

illegal

Pierce-field-

's

cerning Piercefield's student
tus.

sta-

Three other UK students
arrested this week for illegal drug
possession have the same student status as before their arrests,
Johnson said. He indicated no
Johnson indicated.
The suspension is pending a University disciplinary charges
review of the case by the Stu
Continued On Tagr 7
Piercefield has not been
suspended from the University,
but only from attending classes,
arrest.

tions. According to Robert F.
Kerley, vice president for business affairs, results of the study
should be completed by

"The main concern in locating the stadium," Angelucci emphasized, "is the student."
"It ought to be where the
students could get to it by walking. After all it is their game.
I would like to see it on campus
with limited parking around it
and the rest of campus open for
overflow parking," he continued.

Angelucci strongly favors moving the stadium from its Stoll
Field position for three basic
reasons:
Need of the Stoll Field area
for academic building development.
Cost of enlarging the pres-'e-

nt

stadium.

Lack of safety for players
in the stadium and the inadequacy of the stadium for spec-

tators.

Misuse Of UK's Properly
Was Cause Of Suspension

grounds.
Johnson emphasized
suspension as a student
is not a result of the narcotics

Eight Pages

Stadium Issue Not Dead,
Three Board Members Sav

Two Employes Of UK Waive
Arraignment On Drug Charges
Two Medical Center employes
who were arrested Tuesday on
charges of illegal possession of
narcotics today waived formal
arraignment in Lexington Police
Court.
Their examining trial was set

26,

According to Angelucci rounding the stadium on the ends for
building the sideline seats upward with a deck would cost
roughly four million dollars to
seat about 54,000 people.
He said a new stadium should
cost from five to five and one-ha- lf
million dollars to seat about
50,000 people.
Angelucci stated that entrances and exits in the present
stadium were built to serve 12,000
people. He added that other facilities in the structure are inadequate and would be more so

with the increased capacity.
He declared that the stadium
is unsafe for players because it
is too close to the playing field.
"A player can catch a pass on
the sidelines and run into concrete walls. The stadium should
be a minimum of 30 feet from
the field," he said.
Head defensive football coac h
Clarence Underwood agreed that
the stadium is "built too close
to the sidelines" and that players "could get hurt very easily."
Angelucci sees the experiment
farm on Cooper Drive opposite
the football practice field as possibly a good site for moving the
stadium.
He points out it would be
within walking distance from
campus although there is only
one major street nearby.
He also mentioned an area
between Patterson Street and the

Jefferson Street viaduc t as a stadium site possibility.
Smith Broadbent, although
undecided on the stadium issue,
stated that the interest of the
business people of Lexington and
that individuals interested in the
UK sports program outside Lexington should get good consider-

ation.
Trustee Robert

Hillenmeyer
said "it is obvious we need some
more information on the issue.
If it's a problem, I think we
need to face it and make a decision on it."
Gov. Edward T. Breathitt first
mentioned the Coldstream site for
the stadium two years ago at a
Board of Trustees meeting.
Breathitt has said the stadium
should be left as near campus
as possible, but that it would
not be feasible to leave it at
Stoll Field.
University Trustee Sam Lzelle
earlier this week said moving the
stadium from Stoll Field would be

"terrible economics" and that the
needs of the Univ ersity could better be served by enlarging the
present structure.

LBJ Visits
Vietnam
War Zone
From Combined Dispatches

CAM

RANH

South

BAY,

Vietnam President Johnson
pulled another surprise move today as he slipped away from the
Phillipines and "dropped in" on

an American base in Vietnam.
The move was not entirely
unexpected, however, as some
Vietnam visit by the President
has been hinted at since the

Manila Conference was announced.
The President, who spent two
hours and 24 minutes on Vietnamese soil, told troops at the
large U.S. Cam Raim Bay Base
that "We depend on you."
Johnson got clowr to a battlefield than any President since
Abraham Lincoln who actually
conferenced with generals at the
line.
The President ate with troops,
visited wounded, pinned medals
Continued On Page

7

* J --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Ocl.

2(i,

VMM

Frat's GPA Exceeds
All Men's Average

UK fraternities scholastic average exceeded the respective all
men's average for the fall and spring semesters of 1966.
The question has been rais
ed by some students as to whether vidual chapter basis, seven chapor not pledging a fraternity inters were below the all men's
fluences one's grades. According average with the lowest average
to the averages for the fall and for any chapter being 2.270 and
spring semesters of 1966, if any- the highest 2.509.
43 inNationwide in 1964-6thing it helps one to become a
better student.
stitutions out of 295, reporting
The all men's average for 1966 grades to the National Inter-- i
was 2.333 while the average for fraternity Conference had every
the 17 fraternities on campus chapter on their respective camwas 2.388. These figures exclude puses exceeding the all men's
Theta Chi which was a colony. average. Of these institutions
This is not the overall pic- seven achieved this honor for
ture though because the average three consecutive years.
for all the pledges in every fraThey include University of
Akron, Arkansas State College,
ternity was only 2.196.
However the grades of the Georgetown College,
Murray
actives brought up the overall State University, Texas Technological College, Wisconsin State
fraternity average to 2.388.
When compared on an indi- - College at Stevens Point, and
Wisconsin State College at Whitewater.
During the year, 62 percent
of the reporting institutions showed campus fraternity averages
use the
above the all men's averages,
involving 3,159 individual

won?

"DM
xi

Ml

Rehearsing For Sunday

Rehearsing for its Sunday afternoon concert in
Memorial Hall is the University Symphonic Band,
conducted by Prof. Phillip Miller. Sunday's con- -

frtsi

The Collfflat

Service

Colleges and universities are
granting more liberal social regulations to women, though the
privileges often entail exacting
qualifications.
This fall, the University of

Starts

7:30;

Adm.

university

lates.

Formerly

hours. A girl does not have to
sign out any time prior to mid-

necessary.
Last year, the Pcnn administration allowed senior women
to set their own weekend curfews.
Seniors do not have keys, but ask
a friend to wait for their return.

There will be an intramural
officials meeting at 6:15 p.m.
Thursday in Room 107 of the
Alumni Gym. Those planning to
officiate during the intramural
basketball season should attend.
A movie entitled "This Is Basketball'' will be shown.

girls

$1.00

EVERY EVENING

at 8:00 p.m.
MATINEES

i
1

V

r

rw

M

al

Tarn

v

Photographer

Photo

WED, and SAT.

1:30 p.m.;

j

SUN. 2:00 p.m.

winner of "B" Academy awards f

mum
a DAVID LEAN'S FILM
MEIRO GOLDWYN

A CARLO PONTI PRODUCTION

MAYER

0FB0R&PASTERNAKS

DOCTOR ZIIilAGO
JftfANAVISIOn

GUARANTEED

AND METR0C01QR

SEATING!

BUY TICKETS

At the University of Rochester
every class votes on its own curfews.
After a long battle to allow
men in the rooms, women at
Smith College can now entertain their male friends from two
to five on Sunday afternoons.
Doors have to be open six
inches, and three feet must be
on the floor.

And at the University of'
Georgia, administrators are just
now allowing women to visit

men's apartments. The university

does not consider one room an
apartment, however. Bathrooms
don't count as a room either
but a kitchen might.

UK Bulletin Board

Pennsylvania, tired of rushing
back to their dormitories at two
minutes to twelve because they
forgot to sign out, have initiated
a trial system of telephone
s
for

had to sign out personally for
lates which could extend to 1:30
a.m. on weekends and 2:15 on
Saturdays. Now a girl may call
her dormitory and request someone to sign her out for those

Although women must register their destination with house
proctors in case of emergency,
signout cards are placed in an
envelope and not opened unless

sign-out-

FIRST RUN FUN!

organization.

night.

women's hours, and the University of Oregon did likewise
for its sophomores and juniors.
For several years, seniors and
women over 21 have had this
privilege at Oregon.
All upperclassmen at the University of Utah are now eligible
for keys to the dorms, but only
if they achieve a 2.5 average.
The University of Illinois will
experiment this fall with unlimited hours and key privileges
for seniors. If the system is successful, the loosened regulations
will extend to juniors and women

over 21.
Women at the University of

Short Subjecf: "PETE'S PLACE

80-pie-

Social Regulations More Liberal
Massachusetts abolished all

Exclusive! First Run!

cert is the first of the season for the

IN ADVANCE

Town Girls, an organization
for all girls living off campus,
will have a dessert for Circle
K at 7 p.m. Monday at Nexus
in the Presbyterian Center on
Rose Lane.

UNICEF Christmas cards and
calendars are now available in
the YWCA office, Room 204 of
the Student Center.
Women in the Web, the fourth
and final discussion in the Women's Web series, will be at
7 p.m. Thursday in the Student
Center Theater. Sponsored by
AWS, WRH, and the YWCA,
four women from Lexington will
compose the panel. A reception will follow.

Applications are being taken

AT BOX OFFICE

for Off Campus Student Associa-

Isfr OUTDOOR

SHOWING!

PH.
JOHN WILLIAMS
ScraanptmbiMEiTOlKiN

NANCY SINATRA- - LOU JACOBI
Styy'bf

NORMAN

UBOJI

pi UEUIXKIN

ftoduced

THEO MARCUSE
and Dvictod

by NORMAN

252-449-

Starts

5

ncmicoior

7:30

Adm. $1.00

AB80TT

Nov. 7.

Plus

HIS NEWEST!
HIS BIGGESTI

..svn mis

ELUIS PRESLEY

fARAMouNi

my

Applications for the National
Student Assembly of
in Chicago are now available in the Y office, Room 204
of the Student Center. The assembly will be Dec. 27 through
Jan. 2. Interested students do not
have to be Y members to attend.

stark

mm

YMCA-YWC-

WOOD

HavaiianStyle
St'HALVnillS
Complete Fountain Service
Cosmetic Dept. & Drug Needs
FREE PROMPT DELIVERY

Phone

252-269-

THIS PROPERTY

The Kentucky Kernel

IS CONDEMNED
ROBERT RIDF0 89
KATE REID

MARYBADHAM

FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA. FRED COE

cnarles bronson

JOHN HOUSEMAN

EDITH SOMMER

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published (or the students ot the
University of Kentucky by the Board
ot Student Publications,
UK Post
Office llox 4986. Nick Pope, chairman,
and Patricia Ann Nickell. secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894. became the Record in 1900. and the Idea
in 19U8. Published continuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

u

SYDNEY POLIAPK

frV-s- -'A

sstiliuilSs TECHNICOLOR

U

2nd Feature
i

Nichols Pharmacy

250 So. Limestone

tion Legislative Council and Executive Committee. Forms may
be picked up from 9 a.m. to lp.m.
in Room 107 of the Student Center. Deadline for applications is

r.'.".TE:icz:ziiYLiCiyi:-3-

SUBSCRIPTION
KATES
Yearly, by mail $8.00

Per copy, from files $.10
KEHNEL TELEPHONES
Editor, Executive Editor, Managing
2320
Editor
News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor.

8

J

Socials

Advertising, Business, Circulation

2321
2319

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, W.lrnvlav.

!. 2fi.

I

fHl

Rights Meeting Set Third New Dorm Is Finished;
Here For Weekend Coeds To Move In Next Week
The fifth annual college conference on intergroup relations
will meet here Friday through Sunday.
The theme of the conference
will be "Every man beareth the lowed by informal question and
discussion periods. Among those
whole stamp of the human condition," a quote from Montaigne, who will speak before the students are Vernon Jordan, from
and the emphasis throughout
the conference will be on the the Southern Regional Council,
in Atlanta, Ceorgia, andVVilliam
"You Role."
Lee Rathbone, a senior and Stringfellow, author and attorney
State Conference Chairman, said from New York.
A concert will be given by
that it was her desire that
throughout the conference the folksinger Lcn Chandler in the
Commerce Building Auditorium
people participating would keep
the "You Role" constantly in from 9:15 to 11:30 Saturdayeven-ing- .
mind and give special thought
The Conference will continue
to how the human rights moveon Sunday with a speech given
ment related to them as individuals.
by Dr. James Holloway, ProfesThe conference will not only sor of Philosophy, Berea College,
a final discussion group and
be attended by state college
representatives but will be open group reports. The conference
to students who have an interest will adjourn at 2:30.
As a result of the conference
in what is going on in the relm
it is hoped that students will gain
of human rights.
The conference will consist a better understanding of the
of several keynote speakers, fol- - existing everyday reality of racial

Construction workers will vacate a third building in the dormitory complex Thursday, making
way for approximately 130 coeds to move into the
dorm next week.
The coeds will be moved from Building C in
Cooperstown the "latter part of next week," according to Miss Jean Lindley, director of the
housing office.
Thek 130 coeds are those who were originally
assigned to the complex, Building 6, when construction failed to meet the September deadline.
They were assigned to temporary housing in
Cooperstown. Other coeds, who were housed temporarily in the Phoenix Hotel, Town House Motel,
and eighth floor of the Medical Center, have
A NEW BIG LITTLE EDITION

I

I

HfftftllfH)

already been moved into two completed complex
buildings.
This third move accounts for t he rehousing of

all women involved in housing shuffle.
Men, who were involved in the summer rehousing dilemma and are now "doubled up" in
the dorms, will move into the Cooperstown building vacated by the coeds.
Two complex buildings-- 4 and
are
scheduled as men's dormitories will not be completed until later Nov ember and middle December.
These two buildings will round out the five complex buildings w hich w ere scheduled for September
completion and occupancy.
hich

LEAPlN' LIZARDS , HOW
COULD ' GET ,NTO A
V LITTLE THING UKE THIS?

V"

)

and religious discrimination

found in America, Kentucky, and
especially the college communi-

Schedule

ties.

Only by being aware of discrimination can people work to
find ways of implementing positive programs to eliminate discrimination, only then can they

Wisely
Dean Sayi

promote active participation
both on campus and in the community towards the concept of a
society in which all persons, regardless of race, color or creed,
carTparticipate and make meaningful contributations according
to Miss Rathlone.
The Campus Committee on
Human Rights, which is hosting the state representatives, successfully found housing for the
65 expected students.
Students wishing to attend
portions of the conference and
or the concert should register
on Friday from 5:30 to 7:30 outside the Student Center Ball-

Students should be realistic
in planning their schedules for
next semester Dr. Elbert VV.
Ockerman, dean of admissions
and registrar has cautioned.
Course requests will be filled
on the basis of grade point standing which each student should
keep in mind while planning
his courses.

student with a low cumuor
standing
should realize that the probability of his getting a
schedule, at
popular hours, is small and arrange his classes accordingly,
Ockerman said.
Dr. Ockerman has also urged
students to plan a schedule they
can "live with" and not overload courses.
Students who sign up for maximum hours to get the schedule
they want keep other students
from a place in class and force
both students to use the drop-adA

lative

mid-ter-

Monday-Wednesday-Frid-

f

OOOOO,

V

Look How

IT STRETCHES

GOLLY

A
J

J

LOOK REAL

curfew has been postat least two weeks
by Associated Women Students.
The AWS adviser said that "the
committee is still working to get
flaws out so that the survey
will be perfect."
The final draft will go to
the AWS house for approval in
the next week and the women
students will vote sometime before Thanksgiving.
A lack in planning for distribution and collection of the
survey also caused delay.

poned

though their adviser

for

WXI

AND IT ONLY

costs$6

r "Little
Fanny"

"1

Average Leg Pantie $6 00
Long Leg Pantie $6.50
Girdle $5.00

I

STEWART'S

J

Lexington

DAWAH ARE'S
Gardcnside

University Students and Faculty Only!
THURSDAY of Each Week
O MEN'S & LADIES'
Suits 79c each
O SKIRTS

Want
to be
treated like a man?
Then Treat her like
a lady with

cauov or

TMI

SOUTH

Box Bountiful
I

Lexington

2-pi- cce

Ml

.

Plaza,

Cleaning Special!

Diry

O LADIES' PLAIN DRESSES

f HI

GREAT

The survey for extension of
womens

may be in another college. After
seeing their adviser they should
report to the Armory to complete
the
process.

))

it makes meA

AWS Hours Survey
Postponed Two Weeks

system, he said.
Freshmen who entered the
College of Arts and Sciences
in the fall should to the office
of the Dean of Arts and Sciences for instructions and schedbcx)ks

v

room.

d

ule

I
OR-U- EI

pj' ?

and SWEATERS

O TROUSERS & SPORT COATS

79c each
44c each
44c each

4 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
Chovy Chase (Across from Bcglcy's)
Northland Shopping Center
Southland (Across from Post Office)
Winchester Road (Across from La Flame)

mm
One Hour Cleaners,

Dnc

J

* W

W

mm 1

"Shucks, It Was Just One More Little Killing"

Secrecy And Research

In view of the increasing involvement of the federal government in university research and in
view of a similar increase in classified military research, it appears
'necessary that institutions of higher
their
learning should
fundamental roles and purposes.
The University of Pennsylvania
recently brought the issue to light
when officials there announced they
would no longer accept classified,
or secret, research from the governmentexcept in a state of national
emergency.
A university, above all, is an
institution for theacquistionofnew
knowledge through research and for
the dissemination of that newlyac-quire- d
knowledge through the classroom and through publication. Academic tradition and freedom suf--'

fer a severe injury when a university, or a faculty member, enters
into a contractual agreement to do
research when the results may not.
be made known. If a faculty member is pledged not to tell his student about certain new facts and
theories relevent tdtKe classroom
study, the student, then does not
have the advantage of what is
rightfully his.
There is, however, as the Pennsylvania decision pointed out, an
exception to the rule. Only in case
of a national emergency when national security is at stake should
classified research be considered.
This precedent was set in 1939
by two nuclear physicists who sug-

'

..(

'

,

x

II

...

iuir Tlltiil

';.

.

..

v..

I

I
if

mmmm

I

!l

gested the imposition of voluntary
secrecy on the new findings about
nuclear fission. They had forseen
the possibility of the atomic bomb
and what it might mean if Hitler
and Nazi German obtained this
weapon first. Thus, we see there
are times when a higher obligation
supersedes a university's basic purpose to disseminate knowledge.
In general, however, we believe
any university should confine its
research efforts to areas that are
freely communicable and publish-ableven if it means as it surely
will that lucrative, prestigious
government research contracts will
be lost.
e,

Letters To The Editor

Band Member Rebuts Critical Letter
To the Editor of the Kernel:
I am writing in regard to Mr.
Pratt's comment about the UK
Wildcat Marching Band that
in a recent issue of the
Kernel.

or give helpful suggestions that
can make your band better rather
than tear it down?
John E. Black
A & S Senior

In the past four years that I
have participated in the marching
band at the University, many criticising letters have been published
in the Kernel (mostly negative in
attitude) concerning the size, spirit,
participation in school activities,
and style of marching that has
been executed by the band.
Previous to this year, the band
marched in a military drill style
and many caustic remarks were
printed asking why UK did not have
the band of renown as the Big
Ten schools had. Why didn't they
produce more entertaining shows
rather than drill to boring marches
or intellectually stiff concert music?

Complex Drills

ap-perar- ed

This year, Mr. Fred M. Dart
came to Kentucky from the Ohio
State University (a Big Ten School)
where he served in the capacity
of Assistant Director of this fine
band. He brought with him the
secrets of success that have nude
the Big Ten bands what they are
today. But it takes more than just
a change in music or style of marching. It takes work hard work. It
takes time to build a band with
tradition and exactness. Before this
tradition and perfection can be fully
accomplished, there needs to be a
change in attitude of the student
body. Instead of writing cutting

and unjust criticism at the slightest
provocation, why not compliment

say that if there is such an underlying drive in Mr. Pratt!s psyche
to assimilate the spirit of the drill
band, I suggest that he manage
for once to come early enough to
e
see the
show. In this
performance, we do almost exclusively drill, drills that consistently include manuevers a class
above anything that VIP has shown
being performed at nearly twice
the speed.
David N. Felty
pre-gam-

responding to an irreletter recently published
sponsible
in the Kernel concerning the
Marching Band. Mr. Pratt's commentary was to be found often
lacking in applicable analogies.
One such statement was his
platitude concerning the relative
merits of the strict drill band as
compared to our hybrid drill-shoband. Mr. Pratt seems to feel that
I am

w

it is relatively easy to develop
formations. A drill can be perfected by each persons doing the
correct order of events, but a formation is an interaction between
all participants, causing problems
of a higher magnitude. I am also
surprised that he did not notice
that nearly all of our formations
had internal movements adding
again to the complexity.
In conclusion, I would like to

A&S

Freshman

snappier appearance.
The second move forward which
the band of 1966-6- 7
has made is
The American Wildcat is ap- to establish a new orientation of
proximately three feet long. Into the band's purpose which has rethis small space, however, is com- sulted in the
highly entertaining
prised an enormous amount of
e
shows
and half-tim- e
strength and cunning. Another which we have enjoyed so much.
"Wildcat" that students at UK are The break from the more tradifamiliar with is the Wildcat March- tional
type show which they have
ing Band. Although smaller than employed in the
past, is creating
several other college bands, the a new
of the band as one
image
Wildcat Marching Band exhibits which is
original and amusing.
that compactness of good qualities
The third change in the band
which is apparent in its namesake.
this year was the stimulus which
Like all good things, the Wildthe first two reactions -cat Marching Bund has improved produced
better organization. Under the
leadership of Mr. Fred Dart, the
band has changed and is now
more fully capable than ever of
pre-gam-

The South'

(lutstandinn College Daily
Umvfusity of Kkntuc k

WEDNESDAY. OCT.

KSTAIJLISIIKI) 18)t

Wai.tkh

Chant,

26, 1966

Editor-in-Chi-

Cknk Ci.Auts, Managing Editor
Hunt, Executive Editor
Judy Ciusham, Associate Editor
John Ztii, Associate Editor
Fkank Bhowninc, Associate Editor
Phil Sthaw, Sports Editor
Lahhy Fox, Daily News Editor
Barmy Cobb, Cartoonist
Tk.iifcNCK

William Knapp,

Bumntmt Mwmger--

.

.....

area of improvement.
The first appreciable advance
which the band has made is in
the area of straight lines and precise maneuvers, but it has also
decided that is it an organism
whose existence is dependent upon
each of its members. The band
seems proud to be a unit which is
representing the University, and
this new outlook is producing a
three-fol- d

Has Improved

The Kentucky Kernel
M.

since the time it was known as
the Marching 100. This change of
name has been accompanied by a

...... Eo

CAUvbrri

fr'eutatunt Manhery

assuming its role as "the pride
of the South."
This is our band, and it is
our duty to give them the support
which they need. One way of doing
this is to sing our Alma Mater
and the National Anthemn with
the band at football games.
Panhellenic Council

tt.is':Bublic.ilefoUon$Commlttee

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, UV.Itn mI..

t.

L'l,,

l!Mif- i-r

Washington Insight

Bobby And A Trend Toward Generation Politics
By JOSEPH KRAFT

WASHINGTON

-

As

the

name suggests, the "Bobby Phenomenon," now evinced in Sen.
Robert Kennedy's spectacular
tour of the West Coast, is widely
being discounted as a kind of
freak.
But in fact it is only the most
arresting example of a fundamental political trend based on enduring changes of population.
And the trend finds expression
not only in the Kennedy magic
but also in what is perhaps the
most notable feature of the congressional elections the precarious condition of some of the
better known veterans