xt7xpn8xbf6r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xpn8xbf6r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19391208  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  8, 1939 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  8, 1939 1939 2013 true xt7xpn8xbf6r section xt7xpn8xbf6r Best Copy Available

Fhe Kentucky ECernel

The World
Whirls On
conflict
Since the Russio-Finrrs- h
bogged down somewhat this week
because of the heavy snows in that
legion, and since the western front
remained as quiet as it ever was, we
may well turn our gaze back to the
hills of home and see what is hap- pining here.
From New York comes word that
Thomas E. Dewey has definitely en- tered the 1940 presidential race.
Dewey, the
district attor- ney of New York county, announced
his candidacy Thursday after he had
received the indorsements of prac- tlcally all the prominent politicians
in that state. There was no men- ition of a candidate for
der.t.
Dewey made a brilliant record
while servine in the caDacitv cf Drcse- culing attorney. He broke up smuggling rings; he smashed gambling
establishments; he exposed underhanded politics; he made the underworld draw up in its shell.
Now this type of performance
met with Immediate popular approval In New York; the people idolized
Dewey as a man who stood for honest administration. Realizing this,
the young attorney decided to toss
his hat in the ring for the governor's race back in 1938. Dewey tan
good race, but his opponent, Herbert H. Lehman, nosed him out in
the final returns. It was then that
the young attorney saw the need of
organization, the need of a political
machine like the ones he had abolished.
D3wey got busy. He began to make
public appearances: he began shaking hands and making speeches, trying to make the public forget his
defeat in the gubernatorial election.
But he saw that this Job would take
more than just speaking and handshaking; it would require something
big. something so big that it would
completely overshadow his recent
misfire against Lehman, so big that
it would attract national attention
and make him a passible choice for

VOLUME XXX

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congressmen to do their utmost to
keep this country out of the European war was passed by the student
legislature at the regular fortnightly meeting held yesterday afternoon
in the Union building. Copies of
the document, to which the signatures of all members of the student legislature will be attached,
are to be mailed to every Kentucky senator and representative in

POSITIONS

OPEN

IN CIVILSERVICE

Government To Offer
Agriculture Jobs

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Choristers

Rnsso-Fin-ri-

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Will Give

Carol Program

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What They Think

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Last of the Union hops before Christmas will be given
from 9 p. m. to midnight Saturday in the ballroom of the
Union. The Troubadours, making their first appearance on
the campus this year, will
provide the music. Admission
will be 50 cents, couple or
stag.

Eligibility is based upon scfiolar-shi- p
and leadership, a standing of
at least 2.0 and a minimum of 12
hours in the education college is
required.
Initiation will be held at 5:30
p. m. Tuesday, December 12, at
the Lafayette hotel. Following the
ceremonies, the annual banquet will
be held at 6 p.m. in the Red room.
Dr. J. Huntley Dupre, professor
of history, is to deliver the principal address. "The Present European
Musical Ability, Enthusiasm
..
Situation." Mrs. Sherman E. Miller is in tWiil Form liasis Of Awards
Sing
At ODK-Cwen- s
charge of the initiation ceremony
and plans for the banquet are being
Deadline for registration in the
made by Grace Anderson and May
sing has been set at
West. Officers of Alpha Oammi
chapter are Leslie Betz, president; 4 p. m. today, John Hunsaker,
of the affair announced.
Louies
E. P. Hilton,
Lists of individual participants
Willson, secretary; Dean W. S. Tay- lcr, treasurer; and Maurice F. Seay, for the sing, next Thursday, December 14. in Memorial hall, must
counselor.
be turned into the Kernel business
office today.
Twenty-thre- e
groups inciudmt 14
social fiaternities, 8 sororities, and
1
professional fraternity have
for participation to date.
Cups will be presented to the
winners. ODK will g.'e oni cup
to the group judged b"st musically,
and another to the group s'lowing
the most ' enthusiasm. ' Cwens will
award cups to the winners in the
women's divisions.
Rules for the contest tie availSheep from the experiment sta- tion won 11 awards and several able from Hunsaker.
nvnor placings Monday at the In- ternational Livestock exposition in
Chicago, according to a telegram received from Prof. E. S. Good, head
Dr. Per K. PYolich, director oi
of the animal husbandry depart- the chemical laboratories of the
nient.
Standard Oil development, will
The championship was won on a speak at 7:30 p. m.. Monday, in 214
Cheviot lamb and the reserve Kastle hall, on "Chemical Aspects
championship on a yearling Chev- of Motor Fuel and Lubricant Produciot. First prizes were taken on a tion."
Cheviot lamb, a yearling Cheviot,
Dr. Frolich is the author of many
a pan of Cheviot lambs, a Hamp- papers on applied colloid chemistry
pen of Hamp-shire- s. and on hydrocarbon chemistry. He
shire lamb, and a
is now chairman of the petroleum
In the Southdown show, the sta- division of the American Chemical
tion won a fourth on pens of lambs, society. In 1930 he was awarded
and seventh and ninth on individthe Grasselli medal.
ual lambs. Tenth place was taken
Preceding the discussion will be
by an Angus steer. Twenty-on- e
a dinner in the Union at 6 p. m.
sheep were sent to the exposition, for members of the Lexington secall fitted by Harold Barber, shep- tion of lhe American Chemical soherd at the experiment station.
ciety.

To Enter Songfest

ODK-Cwe-

11 AWARDS WON!

AT STOCK SHOW!

Cheviots, Hampshiresj

Take First Places

Frolich To Speak

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of former years.
There is a rape scene, which you
will probahy enjoy, aiii1 tnere is

Sarah Elizabeth McLean
the role of a Venitian pro:
ir.ter-i.-e-tin-

ti'.nte.
Old Ben Jonson wrote "Volpone"
in 1606 and it looks as if human
nature hasn't changed much since
his time. Economic motives siill
govern death-be- :l
maneuvers even
as they do in t! is play. Very fev:
Volpone's
people are as cljver
toady in handling them however.
Clarence Gek'cr play- - the ptrt of
Motca. the ubiquitous toady in the

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Press Conference

homFec

play and his interpretation teems
relatively faultless. I say relative
ly because the role is a very difficult one and Mr. Geiger is on
the staye more than anyone else.
His performance moves the play
and if it seems a trifle monotonous,
it can be excused. I do wish he
would quit standing across himself, though, and not jump about
so much.
Sam NuckoLs, as Volpone the
lecherous Levantine, almost steab-- j
the show from Mr. Geiger. His
ability to convulse an audience with
his Dickensian ponderosity is nev-- I
er better demonstrated than hi this
play.
Corbaccio, an old vulture waking
for Volpone to die. is beautifully
done by J. B. Faulconer.
I am
tiled of writing rave notices about
Mr. Faulconer; so I'm merely going
to say that he is excellent, as al- ways.
Sarah Elizabeth McLean, as the
slinky courtesan, Androggna, who

Convention Will Open
With Registration
This Morning

GROUP

WILL TAP SEVEN

Program To Include
Clark, Shannon

Phi Upsilon Omicroni
Will Initiate

Today

Phi Upsilon Omicrou. national
honorary and professional home
economics fraternity, will hold initiation ceremonies for nine pledges
at 5:30 p. m. today at the home of
Dean and Mrs. Thomas P. Cooper.
Following initiation new members will be honored with a dinner
at 8 p. m. in the Red room of the
Lctfayette hotel. Mrs. Frank L.
McVey will be guest speaker and
Mrs. Thomas P. Cooper will be
guest of honor.
Brief welcome to new members
will be given by Louise McGold-ricpresident of the organization.
Response for the iniiiuLps will be
made by Mrs. Kathryn Wiley.
Those to be initiated are: Mrs
Kathryn Wiley, Barbourville: Margaret Kendrick, Middlesboic; Laura
Johnson, Franklin; Mildred Agnew.
Dorothy Engel Hill,
Henderson;
Marjorie
Helton,
and Margaret
Trent, Lexington.
k,

Keys Initiates
Keys, sophomore honorary, an-- 1
nounced Monday the initiation of
William F. Scott, Brandenburg, and
Guy R. Lamb. Jr., Marion. Scott
is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon,
and Lamb of Phi Sigma Kappa.
BKOH-KAHTO SPEAK
Dr. Robert Broh-Kahresearch
bacteriologist at the University of
Cincinnati, will speak to the Bacteriological society at 7:30 p. m.
Monday, in 306 Biological Sciences
building. Dr. Broh-Kah- n
is a University graduate and a former assistant in the bacteriology department. He will discuss "Modes of;
Action of Sulphanilamide."
N

n,

Reviewer Recommends Guignol's "Volpone"
For Risque Lines, Fine Acting And Directing
WILLIAMS

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Assemble For Two Days

Will

Today Is Deadline

If you haven't seen the Guignol's
presentation of "Volpone" yet this
week, you had probably better go
on over and reserve your seat because the play has some pretty
risque lines and people are going to
ask you about it, and the coffee
being served at intermis; iun is of a
superior quality compared to ih.n

sharp-clawe-

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complains that. "Illigitimacy must
stop somewhere in my family!" is
well worth seeing. Her articulation could be a bit more throaty,
but on the whole, her performance
comes up to Phi Beta Kappa standards. (I saw "Tobacco Road" again
this summer and the girl who playdaughter was a
ed the half-w- it
Phi Beta Kappa; so it's no reflec-tioToo bad Miss McLean is
graduating, I should like to see her
play Aphrodite or something, sometime.
Wayne Howell, Jay Miltner. and
John Lynn, all deserve praise here,
but there doesnf seem to be enough
space.
Frank Fowler, assisted by Christine McBrayer, directed the piece
and. as usual, Mr. Fowler's infallibility is demonstrated. The man's
consistency
in presenting
productions is amazing.
If Levantine means what I think
it does, the play was
but it probably doesn't.
n.

anti-semiti- c.

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17 ga:ne
Kentucky s
schedule.
d
basketball Wildcats.
with two seniors .two juniors and
one sophomore in starting jobs.
will face the Berea college Mountaineers tomorrow night in Alumni
Gym.
Preceeded by a freshman clash,
the varsity boat is billed to start
at 8 p. m. Although the Mountaineers are hardly expected to
'
cause the Cats to work up a laiher.
a capacity audience will probably
view the curtain-raise- r.
Coach Adolph Rupp. starting his
9th season as maestro of the cage- Cats, is expected to dole starting
assignments to Keith Famsley and
Stan Cluggish. forwards: Marion
Cluggish .center, and Lee Huber
and Layton Rouse, guards. In case
Stan, who at 6 feet. 4 inches is
the smaller half of the Cluggish
brothers tandem, does not open at
forward. Walter White or Don Or- -;
me will receive the call.
This year's crop of Wildcats rep- -;
resent a veritable gold-miof
cut-thro- at

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High School

Good

In the first stop on a

voices amidst a background of Christmas greens

Troubadours
To Play
For Hop

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By JOE CRE.VSON

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Despite Loss
Of 5 Men

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Blue Prospects

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new members.
New members are V. Leroy Al-- 'j
mond, education senior, Covington;.,
Besse B. Barker, graduate student,
Lexington; Kathryn Chandler, edu- cation senior. Lackey; J. Everett
Cocanougher,
graduate student. J
Washington; Patricia Davis, grad- uate student, Lexington; Mary E.
Evans, education senior, Martin; I
J. Robert Haselwood, graduate stu- - '
dent, Bardwell;
Annelle Kelley,
graduate student, Lexington; Sart'.
M. Land, graduate student, Lexington; Thomas C. Little, graduate
student, Lebanon; Ruth Marcus,
education senior, Mt. Cisco, N. Y.
Lillian F. McConnell, graduate
student, Lexington; Lila Jane Melton, sraduate student. Kevil: Lewis
H. Mills, graduate student, Lexing- - f
ton; Milburn V. Mills, graduate
student, Florence; Ann Odor, arts
and sciences senior, Williamstown;
Rena Pearl Peden, education senior,
Lexington;
Irma Louise Reason,
senior, Louisville; Emily DeGaris
Reeves, education senior, Winchester; Mary K. Rice, graduate student, Lexington; Mary P. Saunders, education
senior, Hopkins-villDora A. Shields, graduate
student, Bloomfleld; Winnie Sin
clair, graduate student, Berea; Mil
dred Wallerstein, education senior.

By 1IAKKY

wiiivi wii

Mviwvt wmiiiw

The University Choristers

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The regular Christmas convocation will be held at 10 a. m. Wednesday, December 13, in Memorial
hall, according to an announcement
from President McVey who urges
that all students take this opportunity of getting together before the
holidays.
The prcgiam will include the
singing of Christmas carols by the
audience and the University Choirs-ter- s
and a brief greeting by Doctor
McVey in which he will wish the
the national capital
The text of the resolution fol- students and faculty a happy vacation.
lows:
All third hour classes will be dis"We, the members of the Student
Legislature of the University of missed for this traditional convoKentucky, inasmuch as we are the cation. The stage will be decorated
chosen representatives of the Uni- with evergreen and other holiday
versity student body, and inasmuch tokens.
as we are pledged as such to endeavor to the best of our ability to
further the rights and ideals of
that group, do petition of you the
following:
"1) That you, as a representative
in Congress of the youth and citizenry of Kentucky, will never vote
to enter into a war for other than
President.
purely defensive purposes, and
Finally, Dewey decided to take a
"2) That you will pledge to us
long chance, one which meant sure
that you will do all within your
political death if it failed. He de- power to
governmental
The Civil Service Commission
cided to tackle the biggest political policy of maintain a
regard plans to make the consolidated
strict neutrality
organization
in the state Tam- to the present European in
conflict." Civil Service examinations for jumany Hall. It was t'cklish business,
The move came as a result of a nior professional positions in the
so he sat back for a while and
recent Kernel survey in which it United States Department of Agriui ted for his opportunity. He didn't
was found that the University stu- culture, given for the first time last
have to wait very long, for a frightdent body was 96.6 per cent opposed
ened Tammany lawyer heard of the to the entrance of the U. S. into year, an annual affair.
offering nearly
forthcoming prosecution and turned
the war, and in which the majority Under this plan,
state's evidence. Quickly Dewey as- expressed the opinion that the war 30 options, graduating seniors will
sembled his evidence and picked was not
necessarily
a crusade be eligible for appointment about
out James J. Hincs, Tammany's No. against totalitarianism.
July 1, according to Dean Thomas
I, as the victim.
Cooper of the College of AgriThe legislature also voted to join P.
The trial lasted over a month.
culture.
Both sides fought tooth and nail the National Student Federation of Announcement of the examinafor victory; Hines fought to save America, a national organization tion will be made by the federal
government
himself from a prison term. Dewey composed of student
On commission about January 1. The
fcughx for a political future. At bodies in U. S. universities.
junior professional positions pay a
length, the verdict was known. next Thursday, the legislature will starting salary of $2,000- a year and
name delegates to attend the FedHines was pronounced guilty and
eration's annual convention, which offer good opportunity for advancete.it to p:ison; Dewey was
will be held the latter part of this ment for capable workers. Dean
the winner and sent a month in Minneapolis.
Cooper said.
step further toward his goal in the
Examinations will be given durA bill providing for the estab- Vhi!e House.
ing the latter part of February or
uynm ui
With this signal triumph, the
passed first of March in the following
studellt legislature
young attorney's campaign for pres- e measure U designed to permit junior grades: administrative techident began in earnest. The Rcpub- - aU
nician,
"cognted campus organizations omist, agricultural economist, agronMeans have made him their stan- -not granted specific legislative rep- - chemist, animal breeder, biologist,
f.v. resentation by
engineer,
entomologist,
,
the student const i forester,
i.
liinformation
tution to state their cases on the brarian, meteorologist, assistant, t,
beck. The G. O. P. platform will
olericultur-isfloor of the legislature.
probably be witheld until after the
plant breeder, poultry husbandidentity of the Democratic candi
ry tange examiner, rural sociologist,
date is definitely known.
social psychologist, soil scientist,
The following members of
statistician, textile technologist, and
the legislature were absent
LAST MINUTE FLASHES
from yesterday's meeting:
veterinarian.
GENEVA The secretariat of the
Mary Carolyn Gregory,
Leagae at Nations announced that
Lloyd Ramsey, Carl Staker,
Finland had asked the league to
Emmy Lou Turck, and H. C.
call a special meeting of its legislaDavis. Three unexcused abtive bodies in the immediate future
sence... constitute, according to
to consider the present
the constitution, dismissal
situation. It is geneially agreed
from the governing body.
that the Finns want the league t
Kecord of absences
for
declare fanctions against Russia
meetings to date (excused aband ctippie the big nation economsences included! is as follows:
ically so that the Finnish armies
Allen, 1; Amnions., I: Barkwill have some hope of victory in
er. 1; Boo ten, 1; Blythe, I;
the present campaign.
The annual program of Christmas
Caldwell, 1; Clore, 1; Davis,
ROCHESTER. Minn. From the
carols will be presented by the
Z; Duncan, I; Turck, 1; GregClinic today walked Senator
Choristers under the direction of
ory, I; Iliilenmeyer, 2; LowTy,
Alben W. Barkley, majority leader
Miss Mildred Lewis at the Sunday
1; Ramsey, 3; Rans-del- l,
I; Kash,
in the Senate, completely recovered
afternoon musicale at 4 p. m. Sun1;
1; Staker, 3; Triplett,
from a recent disorder which necesday in Memorial hall. Assisting
Zimnirrman, 1.
sitated an operation of a minor
artists will be Lcla Cullis, organist;
Mary Kapp AHton, violinist; and
WASHINGTON Political leaders
According to the measure's pro- Alan Vogeler; narrator.
in both partl-- s are debating the visions, each organization which is The Christmas program by the
question of when to hold the na- recognized by
University Sen- choristers has for many years been
tional conventions to nominate pres- ate may, if it the desires, designate one of the outstanding features of
so
idential candidates. A source close one official lobbyist, who will have the Sunday Muslcales. The group
t the White House stated the ad- the privilege of speaking before the is made up of 36 selected voices
ministration was anxious to rail the legislature
group's first from the Men's and Women's Giee
conventions a month later tins' yrar. mnotirtcr in at that
clubs. They will sing amidst a
Mrh mnnth
"
to save the public the expense of
background of Christmas
greens
Each campus group which meets softly lighted by
that much campaigning, and inci tall cathedral
dentally, to give the Republicans the above requirement and which- candles. The second part of the
less time to prepare their campaign wishes to register an official lobby- program will be devoted to familar
against their unknown opponent.
carols and Christmas hymns in
requested to contact immediately
may particiwhich
the student government secretary, pate. the audience
Ruth Clay Palmer.
The program is as follows:
In the future. ' no individuals
i
It
other than the legislators and the Prwes. tonal ClearC&me Upon the
Midnight
Wllllh
By BOB A.MMONS
recognized lobbyists will be per- When tlie Sun Hud Sunk to
Rest
Old English Noel
mitted to speak on the legislature
The Quest of tlie
Shepherds
How can you recognize a typical floor.
Polish Curol from Cracow
Hie Shepherds and the
A student body budget, submitted
' Joe College?"
Mexican-GaInn
by the treasurer and consisting of Lullaby on Christmas
"He a total appropriation of $3,772.50.
Eve
F. Melius Chrlstaiuen
Bill Blandford, Ag junior
A Ballad
lias three suits and wears the coat was approved by the group, and Stork of tlie Van Dennian Thompson
e
Women's Chorus
cf one, the pants of the other, and will be submitted to President
Old French Christinas
vest of the third so everyone Vey for final sanction,
Oe uert
Carol
gets of rules for the administra- can tell he's got three."
Men's Chorus
II
John Kinnaird, Commerce fresh- - tion of student body social func-ma- n
To be sung by the audience and
"He buys a pair of loud sox tionSj and based upon tlie provi.
choristersi
Handel
has his pants taken up to sions of lhe former University social Joy to the World
and then
O Come All Ye Faithful
Reading
off."
show them
committee rules, also were approved The first Noel
Traditional
Bud llauge, A & S junior "He bv lne group
Hark! the Herald Anuels Sing Mendelssohn
"
HI
thinks he has a way with people
reioluUoa
d
bunnse on Christmas
a fashion P'a-- b"t .wit.
and is
W. B Olds
Morning
committee to investigate
Glazouhow
Anne Overstreet, A & S freshman,
f , " eviober Meditation
nlatform
Mary Kapp Allton. Violinist
"
can tell by the uptilt or the elections, ' and to designate
"You
Adorainus te
Pulestrina
back of his hat. He always thinks most worthwhile planks for con- Rex Oloriae
Samuel R. Gaines
Alan Vogeler. Narrator
everyone is looking at him."
sideration by the legislature.
Harold Dcvrr, Commerce sophoAn explanatory and interpretive
BACTERIOLOGISTS' DINNER
can tell because his
more "You
Staff of the bacteriology depart-- j
article on the significance of the
mouth is always open."
Clayton Robinson. A & S sopho- bills and resolutions passed at this ment will hold a dinner on Demore "His pants are too short and meeting will be published in an cember 14, in the Biological Science
building
early issue of The Kernel.
Ms coat is too long"

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T0i;An1l
iXailOnai YULE ASSEMBLY Education Honorary
StlldCIlt . Federation
Choor.es Students
Ul AlTieirCa
IS SCHEDULED For Membership
I i U Ji v llill Pacsorl
U
U
dsseu
Alpha Gamma chapter of Kappa
Delta
Budget Approved
McVey Will Speak; ciety inPi. national honorary
the education college,
Choristers To Sing terday announced the election of 24
A resolution
urging Kentucky's

ul"

vice-pres-

hrr

NEW

Legislators Will Press JSlspCage-Wiltlcat- s
Will Open Tough Schedule
Peace Plea On Congress of u pledges
With Rama Rattlfi Tnmnrrnvf Micrht
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two-fist- ed

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LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY. FRIDAY. DECEMBER

Z246

KERNEL

OF KENTUCKY

UNIVERSITY

By JIM WOOLDIUDGE

FRIDAY ISSUE
SEMI-WEEKL-

The Kentucky High School Press
association's annual convention,
held under the auspices ot the journalism department, is expected to
attiact more than 2C0 high school
students from throughout the state
to its meeting today and Saturday
on the campus.
Thirty-tw- o
newspapers have been
entered fcr rating and will be
Judged by a committee to be appointed by Prof. Niel Plummer, head
of the journalism department.
Registration of delegates will take
place from 8 to 10 a.m. Friday. Delegates registered by 9 o'clock will
be taken on a campus tour by members of the publicity bureau. Seventeen roundtable conferences will
be conducted Friday dealing with
problems involved in the publication of printed and mimeographed
papers and annuals.
Dr. T. D. Clark, associate professor of history will speak on "Things
You Didn't Know About Kentucky."
at 11 a.m. Friday at a general assembly in Kastle hall. Following the
talk. The Kernel will be host at a
luncheon in the Union ballroom.
Dean P. P. Boyd of the arts and
sciences college will preside and Edwards M. Templin, city editor of
The Lexington Herald, will speak
en "The Press In Transition."
The organization's annual dinner
will be held at 7:20 pjn. in the Union ballroom with Fred B. Wachs,
general manager of the Herald-Leacle- r.
as toastmaster. Prof. J. B.
Shannon, associate professor of political science, will talk on "Propaganda In The World Today." Following the dinner there wiil be a
dance in the ballroom.
At 11:15 p.m. delegates will watch
actual publication of a special high
school edition of The Kernel. A reporter from each school will have
worked on the edition. Copy is to be
edited by the regular Kernel staff.
The papers entered for rating will
be considered from four points of
view Saturday at critical roundta-ble- s.
Leaders of the conferences are
Willis Tucker, assistant professor of
journalism, make-uMiss Marguerite McLaughlin, assistant professor of journalism, writing; Professor Plummer, features and columns: and Dr. Lysle Croft, assistant dean of the college of arts and
sciences, advertising.
A general business meeting will be
held 11:05 a.m. Saturday in room
111 McVey
hall. Reports will be
heard and new officers elected. At
this same time a session for high
school advisers will be held in room
53 McVey hall under the direction
of professor Plummer.
Miss Helen King, assistant publicity director at the University, will
speak before the advisers at 2 p.m.
in room 54. McVey hall. She will
tiilk on school publicity from various angles.
Among high schools to be represented are University. Henry Clay
and Lafayette. Lexington; Girls'
hiuh. Atherton. and Shawnee. Louis-vi.lIrvine. Newport, Newport
Catholic hii,'h. Eminence. Carroll-to- n.
Evarts. Mt. Sterling, Tilghman,
Jenkins.
Valley Station. Lynch,
Cumberland. Butler. Cynthiana-DanvillCentral City, Okalona,
Hazard. Ormsby Village, Frankfort,
Btiea. and Falmouth.
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material and the experts are predicting that they'll be after Coach
Rupp's fifth Southeastern Conference title like a pack of bloodhounds after a jail breaker. Since
coming to Kentucky from the University of Kansas via a small town
high school.
teams
have won 142 games against 31
losses, exclusive of tournament
play. Last year Kentucky racked
up 13 wins in 17 trials and topped
the campaign by taking the conRupp-coach-

ed

ference tourney.
Ordinarily, a team that loses a.s
many key position men by graduation in a season as Kentucky did
last year might be expected to be
like a fish without fins or a water
wagon without water. For instance,
the June roundup corralled Captain
Bemie Opper.
and
guard; Cab Curtis, the
team's high point scorer last year:
Tub Thompson, regular center, and
Elmo Head, diminutive
forward.
Then, early this semester. Caprain-eleJim Goodman was declared
ineligible due to scholastic indigestion.
But Kentucky is expected to be
even stronger this year. Paced by
Famsley .an inexhaustible source
of energy, the Cat offense which
is as tireless and relentless as Ol
Man River, in practice thus far
has appeared more dangerous than
ever. The ability of all five
on the floor to score from any
position gives Kentucky a scoring
punch as dangerous as a match
in a powder dump.
The only problem facui
Coach
Rupp and his
Paul McBrayer. is the pleasant headache
of nominating a certain quintette
as the starting team. The squad
is not only two deep in every position, it's three deep. To fill in at
the forwards the tutorial s a.T can
look to Ermal Allen and Harry
Denham. fresh from the fooiba.1
field, or Lloyd Ramsey and Jim
Mathewson. With the transplanting of the smaller Cluggish to forward, only 6 feet. 8 inch Marion
and Jim King remain as centers.
The starting guards can be relieved without causing the lea.st
bit of uneasiness since Carl Staker.
Marvin Akers. Hoot Combs and
Ken England will be readv for
duty.
Information concerning
Bcna
strength has been as secretive a.,
a house detectives report and the
Mountaineer power remains unckT
the heading of unfinished
ct

n-- n

side-kic-

k.

bu.-ir.--ss

Supper Programs
To Be Held Weeklv
Weekly Sunday night programs,
similar to last year's "college nights."
begin Sunday at 6:15 p. m. in the
Union cafeteria. John Morgan, student impresario, aiuwunced yesterday.

Featuring student talent, the

pro-

gram will include a question and
answer quiz with prizes, dinner music and selected numbers by the
Blue and White orchestra. If Sunday's program is successful, the
series will be continued next semester. Morgan aimounced.

Time Sheets
Must Be In
December 14
All NYA timesheets must be
in the hands of the dean ot
men and the dean of women
by noon. Thursday. December
14. It is imperative
that all
students turn in their sheets
on time, according U Dean
T. T. Jones.

* oesi uopy Avanaoie
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Tage Two

To See If The Pen

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OTT7CTAL NFWfPAPER OF THE STUDENTS
UNIYERPITY OP KENTUCKY

Is Still Mightier

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at the Post Office at Lexlnrton. KenturteT, an stvond

daw matter under t)w Art of March t, r79.
MEMBER

KentacItT IntereoHpglate Prers Association
Lexington Board of Commerce
HMKMNno

POM

one-side-

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Cnileff Puhlishrrt RrpreteuiMire
New York. n.

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is

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Vrrci fMnr
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John II. Morgan
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Reporters
Msrv JinH. Rita Sue Lalle. Fred Hill, Bob Ammons, Jean
Wooldndee, Mildred Murray. Roy Steinfort. Jim
Williams. Jwn
Brovrn. RuareU Wrisht. Bob Henry

Things Are Not
Oi asionally, while yet in high school, we
used to wander over 10 a nearby college campus. In those davs. we felt thai every one of the
critical student body was focused in ridicule on
this poor, uninformed high srhool "kid."
know Iki
Now we an- a senior, and now
A ft it a few vears in college, one finds ihai
(el.
those who look most like, high school suidenis
are really seniors, and those who
V
have thai graduate appearance are
i . n ..nilschool e'lllollces.
Hence, to the two hundred or
s high school press jscnple whom
welcome to the campus today
and tomorrow, this word of advice: If you're
not sine of the .correct answer, say with warmth.
G'wan Buster?' or "Shooi the propaganda to
me. Bahv Roy." Voti'll immediaielv be branded
as a college senior.

SCRAP IRONY
Bt HARRY WILLIAMS

jiipwf

Miss Bridget, lake a

J'.

r

J

.

lac-uh-

v

For several years I have been reading vour
tenelcT stories alxiut man's best friend, the dog.
and I must admit that you have convinced me.
I once had a dog that used to drink Martinis
and watch the maid undress, a practice which
finally led to her resignation. (He's so uncanny,
she used to say.) Tui I realize now that Havcley,
as we children called him, was too much of an
egoist really to have cared much about Agatha.
That was the maid's name, Agatha.
Havcley used to read a lot, I think, for if he
didn't I am unable to account for his pessimism,
his aloofness.
I see now that Haveley was not an ordinary
dog. He used 10 lie about the house, his eyes
constantly on the maid, snorting softly to himself. Indeed, Haveley finally became schizophrenic, and we had to send him to Vienna for
tlie cure.
e
mil) aniAs I say. Haveley was no
mal: so my childhood distrust of the entire
canine family is unfounded. I have since come
to love a dog as much as anyone.
Judge then mv surprise, Mr. Terhune, when
I discovered
last evening that our little friends
sacrificed on the altar of science here
are
at the University; their spleens being scrutinized by saddistic sophomores, their intestines
explored by sanguine seniors.
Often, at night, you can hear ihein howling
and wailing (the dogs, I mean) and the sounds
they make are almost human. I susjcci thai
these harmless puppies are being ripjx-ecn
while they are vet alive and their hearts are
taken from ihein, Uating!
What do you think of this Mr. Icrliuiie?
I'll
you don't like it! Well let uir tell you
Ihiil I think it's a fine thing. The more of these
little heasts ire get rid of, the better off we'll he,
Hai'cley or no llavelryi So sense in htiTing
oivrun with mutts. They can ser.'e no
better purpose than furthering the cause of
siene. I don't know whether they are vh'isee-titithe brutes or not, hu