xt7xpn8xdb89 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xpn8xdb89/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky. University of Kentucky 1941 1942 The University of Kentucky Gradute Schools course catalogs contain bound volumes dating from 1926 through 2005. After 2005, the course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs English University of Kentucky Copyright retained by the University of Kentucky. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. University of Kentucky Graduate School course catalogs University of Kentucky Graduate School Bulletin, 1941-1942 text University of Kentucky Graduate School Bulletin, 1941-1942 1941 1941 1942 2020 true xt7xpn8xdb89 section xt7xpn8xdb89 BULLETIN

versity of Kentucky

Graduate S ch00]
1941-42

July, I 94. I

P11115530 :7. by the University of Kentucky. Entered as Second-Class
.ni'atter at the Post Office, Lexington, Kentucky, under
the Act of July 16, 1924.

ACCfiIfliu‘iec 101~ mailing at special rate of postage provided for in
Set-ion 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized June 30, 1920.

Vol. 33 N0. 7

 

 OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

HERMAN LEE DONOVAN, PH. D., LL. D., President.

JOHN W. BROOKER, M. A., State Superintendent of Schools.

PAUL PRENTICE BOYD, M. A., PH. D., Dean, College of Arts and
Sciences.

THOMAS POE COOPER, B. S. in AGR., Dean, College of Agrieullzrazs and
Home Economics.

JAMES HIRAM GRAHAM, B. C. E., C. E., Dean, College of Engiyu. ‘

ALVIN E. EVANS, PH. D., J. D., Dean, College of Law.

WILLIAM S. TAYLOR, PH. D., Dean, College of Education.

EDWARD WIEST, A. M., PH. D., Dean, College of Commerce.

W. D. FUNKHOUSER, A. M., PH. D., Sc. D., Dean, Graduate Schow'.

J. E. ADAMS, PH. D., Director of the Summer Session.
LOUIS CLIFTON, M. A., Director of University Ea‘tension.
THEODORE TOLMAN JONES, A. M., PH. D., Dean of Men.
L. M. CHAMBERLAIN, M. A., PH. 13., Registrar.

FRANK D. PETERSON, Comptroller.

MARGARET ISADORE KING, A. B., Librarian.

 

 BL} LLlC'l‘IN

i iversity of Kentucky

Gmdzmic S (7/200!
1 9 41 - 4 2

July, I 941

 

  

 (illAlHiA'l‘lG NAOMI/Elf

iAN LEE DONOVAN, A. 13., M. A., Ph. D., LL. D.
President of the University

i DELBERT FUNKHOUSER, A. 13., M. A., Ph. D., Sc. D
Dean 01' the Graduate School

EZRA L GILLIS, A. B.
Secretary ot’ the Graduate Faculty

.us. A. M., Ph. D ......................... Education
i'l'NA‘AI ALLEN, M. S ___________________ Anatomy and Physiology
~ >3; ASHER, M. A ........................... Psychology
. :1i-1N1;U5. B. 8., Ph. D ................... Chemistry
' .11: DEDFORD, A. 13.. Ph. D ........ Chemistry
7 118.13. S., M. 8.. Ph. D ........... Farm Economics
.\. 13.. LL. 13., Ph. D. .................. Sociology
mil-1.31. A., Ph. D. ...................... German
;: Ban, A. 13., M. A.. Ph. D ..... Mathematics
mm: A. 13.. M. A., Ph. D .......... English
2:. ‘:\1. A., Ph. D. ........................ Zoology
ill-Z BUREAU,
, 1],. E. E _______________________________________ Engineering
. i‘N'i'icn, Ph. D. ____________________________ Economics
..l'liR. M. A., Ph. D. ___________________ Economics
‘i.\E\IBl~IRLAIN, A. M” Ph. D ........ Education
i.\llK. A. 13., A. M., Ph. D ......... History
:\'. A. 15., A. M., Ph. D _____________ l\/Iathematics
" Engineering
.wroN DANTZLER,
in, D ___________________________________________ English
\i.\11CK, Ph. D ......................... ....PS§"C110101~3Y
. s‘i'y DOWNING,
.i. 8., Ph. D _________________________________ Mathematics
* ERIKsON, Ph. D. _____________________ Home Economics
‘4. M. A.. Ph. D., J. D ................ Law
RUN FARQUHAR, M. A ............... English
'\ FIZRGUS. Ph. D ________________________ Agriculture
(‘IS GALLAWAY,
. D ............................................... English
um. HAHN, M. 8., Ph. D ........ Physics
_\.\'l)s. M. S., Ph. D ..................... Education
m JENNINGS, M. A., Ph. D ...... Economics
ii. 1) Mathematics

, ““11" ~\i_\N JONES, A. M., Ph. D ........ Ancient Languages

 

 PERRY ELMER KARRAKER, M. A. ...................... Agricultum
CHARLES MERRIAM KNAPP, A. B. P11. D .......... HistOIy
GRANT COCHRAN KNIGHT. A. M _______________________ English
OTTO TOWNSEND KOPPIUS, B. S., Ph. D ......... PhySiCS
JOHN KUIPER, M. A. Philosophy
CLAIREORNE GREENLAI‘IMER B. S. P11. D ...... Mathematics
ARMON T. LAWRENCE, A. B. M. A ................... Commerce
FLORA E. LESTOURGEON, B. A. P11. D _____________ Mathematics
MOSES EDWARD LIGON, A. M., LL. D _______________ Education
ARTHUR CRANE MCFARLAN, A. B., Ph. D Geology
FRANK’F. DflcFARLAND, Ph. I) ......................... Botany
JOHN WALKER MANNING

A. B. M. A., P11. D _____________________________________ Political SClL‘IV
JAMES W. MARTIN, A. M. Economics
RALPH NELSON MAXSON, B. 8., P11. D ______________ Chemistry
JAMES BURT MINER, B. 8., LL. B, Ph. D ...... Psychology
EDGAR ZAVITz PALMER, A. B, P11. D ................. Economics
VIVIEN PALMER. M. A., P11. D ___________________________ Social Work
LOUIS ARTHUR PARDUE, A. B, M. 8., P11. D ..... Physics
ETHEL LEE PARKER,DK.A” _______________________________ Educafion
LEONARD NIEI PLUMMER,

A. B, M. A, P11 D. Journalism
MERWIN ELWOOD POTTER B. S., M. A _____________ Physical Edw
HUGH BRUCE PRICE, P11.D . Ag1icultu1‘e
EDWARD WARDER RANNEELS, B. A. ___________________ Art
GEORGE ROBERTS, M. S. Agriculture
CLAY CAMPBELL Ross A. B, Ph D ______________ Education
L. HOBART RYLAND, A. B, M. A.,

Docteur de 1’U11iversite __________________________ Romance Lan
MORRIS SCHERAGO, B. S., D. V. M .................... BaCLCI‘iOIOg)’
OLUS JESSE STEWART, A. B., M. 8., P11. D ________ Chemistry
RODMAN SULLIVAN, A. B., A. M _______________________ Economies
WILLIAM SEPTIMUS TAYLOR, M. 8., P11. D ...... Education
DANIEL VOIERS TERRELL, C. E. Engineering
L. H. TOWNSEND, P11. D .................................... EDtOIUOlOEY
EDWARD TU111ILI A B. Ph D _________________________ Hist01y
WILLIAM DORNEY VALLEAU, P11. D. ________________ Aglicultuu‘
AMRY VANDENEOSCH, Ph. D. ___________________________ Political Sciw
RALPH HOLDER WE,AVER M. S, P11. ............ Bacteriology
WILLIAM SNYDER WEBB, M. 8., Se. D ______________ Physics
M M. WIIII‘E M. A., Ph. D. ______________________________ Psychology
EDWARD WIEST, A. M., Ph D ____________________________ Economics
RALPH HICKS WOODS, M. A., P11 D ___________________ Education

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UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1941- 1942

First Semester

Monday—Classification tests and physical exami—
nations for all new students

Tuesday afternoon—Freshman registration

Tuesday—~Mccting of Board of Trustees

Wednesday l'orenoon—Freshman classification

Wednesday afternoon and Thursday—Registra—
tion and classification of upper classmen

FridayfiClass work begins

Monday Last date on which a student may enter
an organized class

Monday and Tuesday—Period for filing applica—
tion for degrees to be granted in 1941

Thursday—’l‘hanlx'sgiving holiday

Tuesday—Meeting of the Board of Trustees

Friday, 8 a.rn.—~Christrnas holiday begins

Monday, 8 a.m.~Christmas holiday ends
Saturday to Saturday—Final examinations

Second Semester

Monday—Classification tests and physical exami—
nations for all new students

Tuesday and Wednesday~Registration for second
semester

Thursday—Instruction resumed

Monday—Last date on which a student may
enter an organized class

Monday—Date for filing application for degrees
by students who were not in college the first
semester

Thursday 8 am. to Tuesday 8 am. Easter
vacation

Tuesday—Meeting of Board of Trustees

Wednesday evening—Military graduation
exercises

Thursday to Thursday—Final examinations

Thursday~Baccalaureate services

Thursday Meeting of Board of Trustees

Fri:lay—Seventy—fifth Annual Commencement

Monday to Saturday—Junior Club Week

Summer Session
Monday—Registration for first term of summer
school
Monday—Registration for second term of summer
school
Friday—Summer school commencement
Saturday—Summer school ends

 

 THE (,iltADUA'l‘E SCHOOL
WILLIAM D. FUNKHOUSER, A. M., PH. D., SC. D., l

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

Graduate work is offered in all colleges in the
Approximately three hundred courses are listed in 1?
under the various departments, which are accepted fw
credit.

The following advanced degrees are conferred by the
Master of Arts
Master of Science
Master of Science in Public Health
Master of Science in Agriculture
Master of Science in Home Economics
Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Master of Science in Metallurgical Engineering
Master of Science in Mining Engineering
Civil Engineer (C. E.)
Electrical Engineer (E. E.)
Mechanical Engineer (M. E.)
Metallurgical Engineer (Met. E.)
Mining Engineer (E. M.)
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Science in Education
Doctor of Philosophy

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered with
in the following departments: Chemistry, Education,
English, History, Mathematics. Physics, Psycholo;
Science and in the combined fields of Agricultural Er
Rural Sociology. Minor work may be carried in an}
offering graduate courses.

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STANDING

Graduates of institutions accredited by the UlllVL‘l.
admitted to the Graduate School upon the preseti
certificate of graduation and an official transcript of u.‘
courses taken. The status of the institution is to be asct
the Registrar of the University. Graduates from no
institutions are encouraged to secure a bachelor's do:
accredited institution. In particular cases they may

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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN

:ute School on the basis of doing additional work before

And to full graduate status.
be clearly understood that admission to the Graduate

not necessarily admit a student to full graduate status.

rily attains full graduate status when he has fulfilled all

:try requirements of the degree which he seeks and of the
finder whose direction he is pursuing graduate work.
ll‘llt prerequisites are determined jointly by the Dean of

School and the respective departments. In brief, it may

i: such prerequisites usually consist of the equivalent of
luate major. In some fields, the equivalent of an under—

‘lfll' is sufficient.

~ of the faculty of the University of Kentucky having a
ham that of instructor may not be considered as candi—
.:mced degrees at this institution.

REGISTRATION

students should register in the Graduate School on
prepared for this purpose.

< from institutions other than this University are also
1?.e an official transcript showing (a) all undergraduate
i. (b) graduate work taken, if any, and (c) degrees

curd submitted to the Registrar entitled him to admis-
,i confer with the Dean of the Graduate School and his
«tr concerning preliminary requirements that he may
and as to the graduate courses that he should take.
\ requirements may be added from time to time as
try and all such requirements, together with graduate
i be recorded in the Registrar’s Office and must be
.u- student before he is eligible for the degree for which
‘ ad.
ws listed in this bulletin, and all courses which may
:1 the regular University catalog. which have numbers
may be counted as credit towards a graduate degree.
I) in a course will not be given graduate credit or

FEES

wn lees are the same as for undergraduate students in

ieh the major work is done, that is, $50.00 for residents
$80.00 for non—residents. This does not include a

ii of $6.00.

advanced degree is conferred, a fee of fifteen dollars
:it the Business Office of the University. This covers

it l'ee, diploma fee, fee for binding thesis and all other

 

 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

APPLICATION FOR DEGREE

All candidates for degrees are required to make torn
tion for the degree at the office of the Registrar, on s],
provided for that purpose, at least four weeks prior to :

which the degree is to be conferred.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREE;
A graduate student is expected to familiarize himsr

requirements for the degree for which he is a candidate
responsible for the fulfillment of these requirements. ’.'
to the last dates on which theses may be accepted, tlv
examinations, the proper form for theses and all oil
regarding requirements for degrees.

The University of Kentucky offers the degree (r
Philosophy in the ten departments listed on page 6 of l‘
the regular academic degrees of Master of Arts and
Science in all departments and professional degree:
Health, Education, Engineering, Agriculture and Home
The requirements for these various degrees are as IOlli

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER Ol-‘
MASTER OF SCIENCE
CREDITS
The candidate shall complete twenty-four semesi
graduate work in course with a standing of 2 and no gr:
shall be counted.

COURSES

The major field shall comprise, as to courses, approx.
thirds of the work and with electives (within the dc.
allied departments) of approximately one—third of the
two shall have graduate relationship. All of the w
taken within one department if the student desires.

RESIDENCE

The minimum residence requirement is one acadcnr
weeks. This residence requirement may be fulfilled i
bination of regular semester or summer school sessions
the required number of weeks.

This does not mean that the work prescribed for car
can always be completed in the minimum length of time.
preparation or assistance in departments very frequcw
longer period necessary. Part-time work during a regii
is evaluated on the basis of the amount of work car:
amount of residence for part—time work is limited.
graduate assistants and part-time instructors. to not m-
weeks in any one semester or summer session.

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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN

CREDITS

terred credits are accepted toward the Master of Arts or
.‘tfllCC degrees. All work for these degrees must be done

rsity of Kentucky, However, a student is not asked to
use which he has satisfactorily completed at another

- is required of every candidate. Two typewritten copies
,«ted thesis must be presented not later than three weeks
me set for the oral examination. One copy is presented

of the Graduate School to be bound and placed in the

..ibrary and the other to the major professor to be

the department concerned.

duate School issues a special bulletin giving definite

regarding the form in which the thesis must be
‘(i stating the University regulations regarding the style

title page, biographical sketch, etc., which must be
tudents are required to observe these instructions in
ses and dissertations.

QUIREIVIENT

‘3: knowledge of at least one modern foreign language is

.is language should be pertinent to the program of the
language requirement must be satisfied by an examina—
the foreign language department offering instruction

rue concerned. The passing of this examination shall
the two language requirements for the doctorate.
wage examinations are given by the foreign language
in the first of October, the first of March (unless these

Sunday, in which case the examinations will be held
Alonday) and during the second week of the first term

Session. These examinations are given at no other

dents must take the examinations on the dates specified

:zlit'y for their degrees for the following commencement.

iions of regular class work are taken by all resident

Mitts. A final oral examination is given the candidate
fifteen days before the close of the semester. The Dean
tamining committee of at least three members for the
ting its members from the major and minor professors
.ork was done. The clean is c.1- ofl'icio a member of all
i: committees. The candidate is asked to defend his
szamined on any subject matter related to his field.

'{TS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS IN
:IN AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

.ssiorml degrees of Master of Arts in Education and
thee in Education are open to students who have re—

 

 10 UNIVERSITY or KENTUCKY

ceived either the degree of B. A. or B. A. in Education, or the (,
of B. S. or B. S. in Education.
Two plans are provided for satisfying the requirements for
of these degrees as follows:
1. Twenty-four credits in graduate courses exclusive of thc
with an average standing of 2 or better, one academi
(36 weeks) in residence, and an acceptable thesis. Np
below C is counted toward an advanced degree.
At the option of the department (not of the student) the r
degree in education may be granted upon the comph
”thirty—six credits in graduate courses with an average s
of 2 or better, forty—eight weeks in residence, and no r
ment of a thesis.
There is no language requirement for either of the prol
degrees in education.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF St
IN AGRICULTURE AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
HOME ECONOMICS

Students holding a bachelor's degree from a standa:
cultural college may obtain the degree of Master of Sc:
Agriculture or Master of Science in Home Economics by s
the following requirements:

1. The completion of 24 credits of graduate work

average standing of 2, 36 weeks of residence, and a ‘
The completion of 36 credits of graduate work with
ing of 2 or better, 48 weeks of residence, and r
requirement.

Under either plan no grade below C may be counti
One—half the work must be in one department.
maindcr in any other department or departments :
by the major professor.

There is no language requirement for either of thes
sional degrees.

In either case a final oral examination is given the cand
later than 15 days before the close of the semester in \r
degree is to be secured. The candidate is expected to show
prehensive knowledge of the subject matter related to thl.
his major work and in case a thesis has been prepared to deft

Graduate students in the College of Agriculture fall i
groups:

. Group I.——Those who have presented the degree Bat“
Selence in Agriculture or Home Economics and plan to 1m
thesis under the direction of a major professor in their
work.

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 GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 11

oup II.—Those who do not have the degree Bachelor of
4; in Agriculture or Home Economics and plan to prepare a

Such students may not have had certain essential under—
to work. In such cases the major professor will recommend to
.iduate committee a plan to strengthen the student in such
asses. When approved by the committee this plan will
~ the basis for the student’s graduate program.

wup III.—Those students who have the degree Bachelor of
. in Agriculture or Home Economics and request the option to
‘w thesis and present 36 credits in graduate courses and 48
.ri‘ residence. Such students will choose a graduate adviser
,ll aid them in preparing a program for graduate work. The
n will be submitted to the Graduate Committee for approval
1 the student’s residence period.

up IV.—Those students who do not have the degree Bachelor
‘lCC in Agriculture or Home Economics and who request the
o omit the thesis and present 36 credits in graduate courses
weeks 01' residence. Students in this group will Choose a
adviser who will aid them in preparing a statement of the
le‘s program for the master‘s degree. Approval of this pro—
the Committee must be obtained early in the student‘s
re period. Candidates in Group IV should take one or more
preferably advanced courses, in each department of the
of Agriculture in which there is a required course for the
ol’ Science in Agriculture or Home Economics.
. Graduate Committee does not assign the graduate student to
professor or graduate adviser; this must be 01' the student's
aosing. However, the Committee will advise with the
v students and make appropriate suggestions.

\‘EMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF lVIASTER OF SCIENCE
IN PUBLIC HEALTH

tents holding a bachelor’s degree from a fully accredited
n or the M. D. degree from a recognized Medical School
aim the degree of Master of Science in Public Health by
;; either of the following requirements:

’l'wenty-lour credits in graduate courses with an average
standing of 2.

No grade below C may be counted.

'l‘hirty—six weeks of residence.

.\n aceeptable thesis.

The passing of a final comprehensive examination.

we is no language requirement for this degree.

 

 12 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES IN ENGINEEI 1 "

Two classes of advanced degrees are offered in the Collc
Engineering, the Masters’ Degrees and the Professional Degrees

THE MASTERS’ DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. The Masters’ degri
engineering may be obtained by satisfying the following re<
ments:

1. Twenty—four credits in graduate courses with an a\

standing of 2

N0 grade below C may be counted.

Thirty-six weeks of residence.

An acceptable thesis.

Two- thirds 01' the w 01k must be in the major subjec:
There is no language requirement f01 these deg1 ees

The candidate must hold the c01icsponding Bachelor of S
deg1ec in end1nee1 111g 1'1om this institution 01 110m anothe1 en;
ing school of 1ec0gnized standing. The degrees 01101 ed a1e Ma
Science in CiVil Enginee1ing, Master 01' Science in E111
Engineering, Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, .
of Science in Metallurgical Engineering, Master 01' Sciei
Mining Engineering.

T111: PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. The p101(
deg1ee 0f Ci\ il Enginee1 (C. E. ), Elect1ical Enginee1 (E. E. ), l\I
ical Engineei (M. E.) Mctallu1gical Enginee1 (Met E.), 01 '
Enginee1 (E. M ) \\1ll be g1 anted only to g1aduates 01' the Uni
of Kentucky, College 01' Engineeling, who p1 esent satis
e\ 1dence of p1ofessional wo1k 01' c1editable quality in the en
ing fields 01' thei1 choice extending 0\ er a pe1iod of five yea
who submit satis1'acto1y theses as 1'u1the1 evidence 01' thei1
sional attainments.

A candidate holding a maste1 s deg1ee in enginee1ing 5'
considered to have fullilled two yea1s of the fiVe years 1equi
1'01 the conesponding p101'essional deg1ee.

An application 101 a professional degree must be made
Dean of the Graduate School and have the approval 01' the G:
Committee 01' the College or Engineering not less than one ac
year before the degree may be granted. Advanced degrees 1‘
granted at any one of the regular University Commen
periods.

The Graduate Committee will pass on the qualifications
applicant. It may, at its discretion, require an oral exami'
The applicant is expected to submit a record of his cngi:
experience, which should include a complete list of his prof:
engagements, showing in each case the length 01' time employ
the position held. He should give for references the name
least three pe1sons who a1e familia1 with his enginee1inr
Prefe1ably these pe1sons should be connected with the origan
by whom he has been employed.

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 El,K
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GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 13

.. thesis is required of each candidate. It may be in the field
warch, design, invention or engineering processes and methods.
.portionately longer time.

Candidates for the doctor’s degree who major in the Co?
Education may not satisfy residence requirements entirely by ;
ance in Summer Sessions, but must attend at least two sen
during the regular college year. (See announcement under
TION.)

 

 GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 15

'hile it is expected that a well-prepared student of good ability
:cure the degree upon the completion of three years of study, it
v.7 be understood that this time requirement is a minimum and
My secondary to the matter of scholarship. Neither time spent
4,): however long, nor the accumulation of facts, however great
munt, nor the completion of advanced courses, however numer—
an be substituted for independent thinking and original
l-lir
‘orl; done in other institutions of learning may be accepted
l the doctorate at the University of Kentucky but no work is
:l which has not been done in a college or university of recog—
standing or in a research laboratory.

tics REQUIREMENTS
:e applicant must give evidence of having a good reading
(lge and of being able to translate at sight at least two modern
5 languages. This proficiency is determined by examinations
"led by the respective language departments. The German
-ncnt will examine applicants during each semester and also
the summer session. Ordinarily French and German are
id to be offered, but other languages may be substituted on
1lL‘!l(ifltl()ll of the special committee if it is considered that
:snguages are of greater importance in the special field of
The language requirements must be satisfied before the
‘it can be admitted to the qualifying examination.

. YING EXAMINATION
irilicants for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy are required to
Qualifying Examination. This examination shall be taken dur—
second semester of the second year of residence. The examina—
1111 be both oral and written and shall cover both major and
subjects. It shall be prepared and {given to the applicant by a
'tee of five to be. appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.
euag‘e requirements must have been met before the qualifying
.ation is taken. No applicant may proceed to his final examina-
lll one year of work has been completed after he has passed
lil'ying‘ examination. If the applicant fails to pass the quali—
‘~:amination. no re-examination shall be allowed except upon
wmmendation of the special committee and the approval of the
' 1e Dean. If the applicant passes the qualifying examina-
is then considered as a candidate for the degree and may make
application for his rating.

'1' .\'l‘ION

"h candidate must present a dissertation covering his thesis
This dissertation must give evidence of the candidate's ability
_v on independent investigation and must be satisfactory in
.Ed composition. It must represent a definite contribution to

 

 16 UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

the knowledge of his subject, must be the result of independent '
must include original research and must in some way add to or t
wise modify what was previously known on the subject. Two 1
typewritten copies of the thesis and an abstract Of not less than
nor more than 3,000 words must be formally presented to the D«
the Graduate School at least four weeks before the final examii:

PRINTING OF DISSERTATION

One hundred printed copies of the dissertation must be pro;-
to the University within one year from the time when the deg
conferred. Not later than one week before the conferring i
degree the candidate must deposit with the Business Agent i
University the sum of $50.00, this amount to be returned '
printed copies are received within the time specified. The U
sity does not obligate itself to publish the thesis but if in the
ment of the Graduate Committee the thesis or an abstract Oi
should be published, the University reserves