xt7xsj19mp1w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xsj19mp1w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19360310  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1936 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1936 1936 2013 true xt7xsj19mp1w section xt7xsj19mp1w Best Copy Available

SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

OF

UNIVERSITY

KAGAWA'S TALK
Extra Facilities to Re Set
Up for Addresses of
"World's Greatest
Christian"

U OF K GRADUATE

Feature

Orchestra

Of Sunday Vesper CRASH SUNDAY
Is

Josephine Filhian
Guest Artist at
Recital

Miss

Ship

of

Robert Giovannoli
looses Win?, Spins from
500 Feet Into
Ground

FRANK BURGER
"Classic" is the word that describes the performance of the Uni-- v WAS MEMBER OF Till
TO HE GIVEN AT 4 P. M.,
ers 1
Philharmonic
DELTA THETA AT UK
7:45 O'CLOCK, MARCH 11 conductedy by Prof. Carl orchestra,
Lampert,
at the Sunday Aftornlon muslcale,
1

Class Sends Resolution
Of Condolence to
Family

Lecture Is Sponsored by U.K. presented to a
audience Sunday at 4:07 p. m. in MemI B, Transy, Local
orial hall. Josephine Flthlan apMinisters
half-capaci- ty

Toyohlko Kagawa,

the "world'
and Japanese
leader, will apeak at 4 p.m., and
7:45 o'clock at night, March 11, in
the Woodland auditorium. Due to
the great demand for tickets, his
addresses will be broadcast over
station WLAP, and a radio will be
Installed In the Woodland Christian church.
Brought to Lexington by the University YWCA and YMCA, the Lexington Ministerial association, and
the Transylvania College ' of the
Bible, Dr. Kakawa will speak to
about 4.500 people from all parts of
the state. Delegates from Berea,
Eastern State, Georgetown, Asbury,
Frankfort Industrial, Union, and
Kentucky Wesleyan colleges have
already received tickets for the lectures, for which no admission
greatest Christian"

charge is being made.
Tickets will be good only until
twenty minutes before the lecture
begin, and at 3:40 and 7:25 the
doors will be opened for all, with
or without tickets.
The afternoon address will be
presided over by Dr. Arthur Bra-de- n,
president of Transylvania. The
program will also include an or
chestra prelude, scripture reading
by J. R. White, Jr., of Georgetown
college, and an opening prayer by
Martha Fugett, president of the
University YWCA.
Dr. B. C. Bobbitt will preside over
the evening meeting, Dr. Christopher Bparllng will read the Scriptures, and Dr. T. C. Ecton will offer the opening prayer.

HEW

FARM

BILL

VIEWED BY DEAN
New Soil Conservation Act
May Be Placed Before Ken
tucky Farmers Soon, Says
Cooper
Upon his return from Memphis,
Tennessee, last Saturday, Dean
Thomas P. Cooper of the College of
Agriculture said that details of the
new soil conservation and domestic
allotment act may be ready to be
placed before farmers of the state
within two or three weeks. At
Memphis, Dean Cooper attended
one of the four regional conferences held over the United States
to consider ways of putting the new
program into effect.
Other persons from Kentucky attending the conference at the request of Secretary Wallace included Ford Patterson, Mt. Sterling;
M. D. Rouse, Winchester; Perry B.
Gaines, Carroll ton; Leslie Ellis,
Murray, and Roscoe Stone, Hickman, representing the farmers of
the state, and O. M. Farrington, C.
A. Mahan, C. D. Phillips and O. R.
Wheeler of the College of Agricul-

ture.
The meeting, other than the address delivered by Secretary Wal-

peared as guest soloLst.
Professor Lampert renewed his
popularity with muslcale audiences,
as the entire concert was excep
tionally wcll-llkby those who
were present.
At times the group showed bril
liant technique and Interpretation;
at other times its performance was
only mediocre, but the program as
a whole showed careful prepara
tion.
The more symphonic numbers
were not as
as those of
a lighter nature, Judging by the au
dience reaction.
Those especially
enjoyed were: "Young Prince and
Young Princess" by Rimsky-Kors- akov, beautifully arranged to fea
ture a variety of instrumental so
"Mislos; Ferde Grofe's
sissippi Suite", and "Tales from
the Vienna Woods" by Strauss,
with its famous waltz that seems
to breathe the spirit of gay Vienna,
The antics of a flute player were
amusing to the audience. 'When
ever faced with a solo passage, he
would Invariably sway In his chair
ed

well-lik-

ed

well-kno- wn

and brandish his flute in a manner
that was almost ridiculous. We do
not wish to be unduly critical, but
it certainly seems that such vaudeville technique has no place on the
concert stage.
In a rich, mellow voice. Miss Flthlan sang a group of five songs,
four by Rachmanioff and one by

Her encore was not
announced to the audience. It was
"The Shower" by Zeckwer. Ralph
Briggs was at the piano.
Ne:vt week's muslcale will be presented by the members by Phi Beta,
honorary music and dramatic so
- ..
rority.
Tschaikowsky.

Lances will meet at 7:15 p. m. to
day at the Delta Tau Delta house.
All members please be present.

YMCA Banquet Will
Be Given Tonight
The YMCA will be host to the
YWCA and other students of the
University at a banquet to be held
at 6 p. m. Tuesday night at the
First Methodist church at High and
Upper streets.
The speaker of the evening will
be Pres. Frank L. McVey. Music
and the program will be under the
direction of Seth Botts, chairman
Tickets
of the Social committee.
may be obtained from any member
of the YMCA Senior and Freshman
cabinets or at the door for 25 cents.
president of the
Donald Riester,
YMCA, will preside.

COUNCIL

MAKES

LETTER AWARDS
to Var-

Nine Letters
sity Netmen, Boxers; Eleven Freshmen Are Voted
Each Go

Numerals
lace, consisted of a series of committee conferences in which various phases of the new program 11 Nine varsity basketball letters,
freshman numerals, and nine
were discussed and recommendations made to the Department of bo:lng letters were awarded to
As soon as the De- athletes at a meeting of the athletic
Agriculture.
partment can study these recom- council last week.
The varsity letters were awarded
mendations, it Is expected that the
program will be placed before to Captain Millerd Anderson, Ralph
Garland Lewis, Jim
farmers of all states. In the mean- Carlisle,Russ Ellington,
Red Hag an,
time, farmers who plan to particiWalker,
pate in the program may be as- Warfleld Donohue, J. RiceMay was
sembling Information on the nor- and Bruce Davis. Jack
crops awarded a manager's letter.
mal acreage of
Manager's numerals also were
grown on their farms, and wherever
practicable the normal yield of the awarded to John McKenney, Tom
crops grown my Nichols, Philip Harlng, Bobby
major
and the acreage to be devoted to Stilts.
Members of the freshman basket
and
ball squad voted numerals were
uses tills year.
N. P. Adams, Lawrence Garland,
Walter Hodge, Ernest Hardin, Elmo
Head, Frank McLane, Bernard Op-pHarold Rose, Robert Strohm,
Homer Thompson, and Robert Tice.
Freshmen managers awarded nu
The Graduate Woman's club of merals
were
Faulkner,
Nelson
the University will hold a dinner Charles Moody, and Robert Stone.
meetmg Wednesday, March 11, at
For the first time in the history
the Patio, at 6 p. m. Following the of the University, letters were
dinner the group will retire to the awarded in boxing.
Those who
home of Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes, as- received a leter were Milo Karsner,
sistant Dean of Women, for the Buddy Curry, Bobby Evans, Dick
business meeting.
Butler, Robert Forsythe, Joe Moore,
The speaker will be Mrs. Alberta Jim Wadlinglon, Nick Lutz, and
Server, assistant professor of ro- Sherman Hinkebein.
Jay Luciun
mance languages, who will speak on received a manager's letter.
"The Value of Travel to a Graduate Student." Fannie Herman,
EDDY HAS NEW POST
president of the club, Mill preside.
Dr. C. O. Eddy, for five years as
Le Cercle Francals will meet at 3 sociate entomologist at the Univerp. m. Wednesday In the Science sity Experiment Station, left Sat
building.
Prof. Joseph Barron of urday for Baton Rouge, La., to be
the Art department will lecture In come head of the Department of
French on "French Cathedrals In Entomology at Louisiana State
the Middle Ages."
Go-for- th,

UK Graduate Club
To Hold Meeting

NEW SERIES NO. II

10, l'J.if,

'THE NEGRO' TO
DOCTOR COLTOtl Dean Blanding To
Time Limit Set
On Kagawa Stubs WILL SPEAK AT Address "Y" Frosh BE SUBJECT OF
KILLED IN PLANE

SEEK U.K. Philharmonic

ADMITTANCE TO

DR. ETHAN COLTON.
TODAY, 10 A. iM.

KENTUCKY

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, MARCH

VOL. XXVI.

HUNDREDS

CONVOCATION

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

TUESDAY EDITION

er,

Lieut. Robert Giovannoli, grad
uate of the class of "25. was killed
instantly at Logan Field, Balti
more, Maryland, Sunday afternoon
when his Army plane crashed while
he was on a
flight
from Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio.
cross-count-

ry

Tickets for Toyohlko Kagawa,
famed lecturer, will be good until 20 minutes before the speech
begins, after which time the
doors will be opened to all who
they
wLsh to attend, whether
have tickets or not. It is necessary to be in Woodland auditorium before 3:40 p. m. for the
afternoon lecture, and before
7:25 o'clock for the evening lecture to secure seats under this

arrangement.

Howard

CLOSE

Gardiner, Western

State Teachers College, to
Enter Divisional College
Oratory Contest

Qlovannolls single-seat- ed
pur
suit plane lost Its right wing coming out of a glide and hurled down
In a crazy spin from an altitude of
Howard Gardiner, Western State
less than 500 feet. It rolled over Teachers college. Bowling Green,
after hitting the landing field and won the Intercollegiate Oratorical
was demolished. The flier was dead association contest prize of 125 for
before spectators could reach the Kentucky in a final contest held In
wreckage.
Bowling Green March 7. Harold
Lieutenant Giovannoli, a native Walker, of Centre College, was
of Lexington, was
awarded second prize.
,
here, and was prominent In colGardiner, whose subject was "It's
lege activities. While at the Unia Crime," will go to Evanston, 111.,
versity he was a member of Phi to compete In the divisional contest.
Delta Theta,' social fraternity, Should he win this, he will enter
and Tan Beta Pi, honorary enthe national contest, which will
gineering
fraternity. Following also be held at Evanston.
his graduation In mechanical enNo one from Kentucky has ever
gineering he was employed for advanced farther than the divisiontwo years by the General Elecal. In 1921 W. O. Keller, former
tric companv, stationed at
University of Kentucky law student,
N. Y, and In 1927 joined won first place.
the air forces In the United
Colleges entered in the contest
States Army, graduating from the at Bowling Green were University
primary school and the advance of Kentucky, Berea. Transylvania.
school at San Antonio, Texas, In Centre,
Asbury,
Eastern State
1928.
He was commissioned in Teachers, Western State Teachers
the air corps reserve in October and Georgetown College.
of 1928 and entered active servW. R. Sutherland, of the Depart
ice a second lieutenant on May ment of English at the University
one-ye8, 1930.
He completed a
of Kentucky, is chairman of the
course In almlane ensrlneer-In- g Kentucky division of the associaat Writht Field in 1934.
tion.
As a lieutenant in the corps, he
was awarded a medal last October
for his heroic work in rescuing two
men from the flaming wreckage of Two Performances
the Boeing flying fortress after it
crashed during armv bomber tests
at Wright Field. Davton, Ohio. With
Of
a fellow pilot, he had hastily pulled
his coat over his head and charged
into the flames to drag the crew
Are Shown In City
of the giant bomber to safety.
was the second graduate of
He
the University to low his life
Smacking a bit too much of the
while flvinr as a member of the bestial and of naked realism, "ToUnited States Army Air service In bacco Road," a three-aplay writrecent years.
ten by Jack Klrkland, was present
On Amrust 30. 1930, Lieut Wilyesterday in two performances
ed
liam Albert Harbold, class of 1928 at the Opera House theatre.
and also a rraduate In mechaniKlrkland has based his play upon
cal engineering, crashed and was the novel by Ersklne Caldwell, a
drowned off Sandy Hook while native of Georgia himself and thus
flvinr from Washington to Mitchto describe in
ell Field, Lone Island.
detail life in the back counGiovannoli,
Like Lieutenant
try of that state. The entire
Lieutenant Harbold also crashed takes place at the farm of action
Jeeter
to his death on Sunday.
Lester, situated on a tobacco road.
Lieutenant Giovannoli visited his The setting Is, of course, simple,
parents here several times each consisting of a dilapidated old
vear each time flying his own plane.
right, a well on the
shack on
His parents, who were in Palm left, and the the back, a broken-dow- n
at
Beach, Florida, when notified of
fence, from which stretch
their son's death, left immediately away the tobacco fields.
for Lexington where the body of
The scene opens on Dude Lester
the flier will be brought for burial.
No definite plans for funeral serv- and Ada, his mother. With the appearance of Jeeter, his father, there
ices have been made.
Besides his parents. Lieutenant comes the beginning of a stream of
profanity that does not cease
Giovannoli is survived by a brother, Leonard Giovannoli, who is on throughout. The plot is not coma geological field trip at Bryan ts-- plicated. The family is hungry;
hence, the object Is to obtain food
ville. Texas.
as soon as possible. Since Jeeter is
well-kno-

ar

Tobacco Read'

ct

well-equip-

au-the-

"saving himself" for something we
RESOLUTION PASSED
never know Just what then stealThs following resolution on th death of
ing is the next best thing. At this
Lieut. Robert Oiovannoll wu pasted yes
Bensey, his son-in-l- aw
point,
terdar by the class of '23, of which he was comes Lov
to complain that Pearl, Jeegraduate:
Whereas, Robert Giovannoli, beloved and heroio member of the
rtam of 1925. at the University of
Kentucky, having brought honor
to his family, his University and
his country In the execution of his
noHln concent of duty and
Whereas, in the continuation of
hs country's work, he has met
his untimely death; be It resolved

that

We. the members of the Class
of 1925, with mixed feelings of

pride In his unswerving loyalty,
deeo tM at his Irreparable loss,
and gratitude for the contacts we
enjoyed, during four years of college life, with so manly a man:
do hereby extend to the members
of his family this expression of our
sympathy.
Be It further resolved that a
copy of these resolutions be sent
to the family of Robert K. Giovannoli, the Alumni association of
the Unlvemity of Kentucky, the
Kentucky Kernel and the dally
press.
(Signed)
,
.

PAUL W. MATTHEWS.

Acting Skcrftary.
Commitike
HELEN KING
BESS PARRY

Internationally Known Lec
turcr to Address Students
at 10 a. m. Today in
Memorial Hall
IS AUTHOR OF MANY
WELL KNOWN ROOKS

Was Responsible for Estab
lishment of "Y" in Russia, Siberia

STATE SPEECH
FINALS

UK CONVOCATION

ter s daughter, is "not treating him
right." Thereupon ensues a Utile
scene with Elite May, the ugly
duckling of the lot. Lov's bag of
turnips are taken by Jeeter and
thus the essential desire is satis-fle- d.
Sister Bessie Rice, the woman
preacher of the community, arrives
to pray for them all and leaves
with a proposal of marriage to
son. Hearing
Dude, the
God during the night, Bhe appears
the following morning with the
promise, of a new automobile If the
marriage is consummated.
The upshot is that they do marry
and finally return in the afternoon
to Jeeter's In the meantime. Lov
has come back for Pearl, announcing that she has run away to Augusta. Late in the day, the Lesters
are surprised by the arrival of Captain Tim, whom they have heard is
about to come home, and George
Payne, a banker from the city. Unless Jeeter pays money he can ill
afford, he will be forced to leave
his land. Hence, Due and Sister
Bessie are sent to Augusta to get
money from Tom, another son.
Pearl returns to her mother and
spends the night there. The trip is
unsuccessful and as they are ready
half-witt-

to leave again, Dude accidentally
backs the new car over his mother.
She dies in Pearl's arms. Jeeter
sends Dude and Bessie away, inLEGAL FRAT INDUCTS
structs Lov to dig a deep grave for
Breckinridge Inn of Phi Delta Ada. and tells Ellie May to run to
Phi, national law fraternity an Lov's house and "maybe he'll let
nounces the initiation of the fol you stay."
The play portrays the lazy, slovlowing: Frank Dalley, Jr., Frank
fort; John Luclan, Jamestown, N. enly type of Oerogian Illiterates In
Y.; Manning 8. Holllngsworth, moderuly realistic setting. It is
M'ddlesboro;
William 8. Caiidlll. starkly vulgar, blasphemous In
Hlndman; Dewey E. Miller, Hazel sense, very close to nature, In fact,
Green; Olney B. Owen, Glomoln, so close that It becomes bestial at
tunes.
and Earl L. Cole, BarbourvUle.

Dr. Ethan Colton, authority on
ernatlonal relations,
traveler,
and Y. M. C. A. worker, will address
the students and faculty of the University In convocation at 10:00 a. m.
Tuesday morning in Memorial hall
on the subject "The Challenges to
the Youth of Our Times."
Dr. Colton is a traveler in thirty
nine foreign countries of the world
and is noted for his lectures on the
modern governments of the world.
Various contacts with leaders of the
world has given him a
attitude on the political questions of the world.
During his many years of work,
Dr. Colton has been traveling secretary of the student department
of the international commission of
the Y. M. C. A. secretary of the foreign department of the same unit,
chairman of the commission on
missions and governments for the
foreign
missions conference
of
North America, is American secretary of the Universal Christian
Council for Life and Work, and is
listed in the nations "Who's Who."
Doctor Colton is the author of
"The X. Y. Z. of Communism., and
his forth coming book, "New Deals,
Home and Abroad" will compare
the revolutions in Russia. Italy,
Nazism, Communism, and Fascism
with the New Deal of the United
States. Some of the future and
past speaking engagements Include
the Universities of Brown, Illinois,
and Arizona, Royal Institute of
Affairs, London, Union
League, Chicago, and Klwanis and
Rotary club units in various parts
of the United States.
Doctor Colton will arrive in Lex
ington Monday evening.
itnf

an

On

Individuality SECOND

Fourth in Series of Discus
sions on Personality to
lie Held

will
Dean 8arah O. Blanding
speak to the YWCA Freshman
group at 4 p. m. Thursday afternoon on "Individuality". This Is
the fourth In a series of discussions
on personality that the group Is
studying.
Other speakers have been Martha
Fugett, who discussed "The Types
of Personality," Augusta Roberts,
on "The Art or conversation," ana
Dr. Henri Beaumont on "The Psychological Viewpoint of Personality."
Mary Jane Roby, chairman of the
group, will preside at the meeting.
All freshman girls are invited to
attend, including those from resi
dence halls, sorority houses, and
town.

Chess Tournament
Commences Monday
The University of Kentucky chess
tournament, which was inaugurated
by James Irvine, began Monday,
March 9, with 18 entrants compet
ing for the title of University chess

champion.
One round will be played each
week and the winner will receive
an award. The chess boards are
located at the Kappa Kappa Gamma and Chi Omega houses.
Those entered in the tournament
include Dot Babbitt, Ed Beck, Vir
ginia Brown, Tinker Dean, Martha
Milton, Francis Montgomery, Donald Irvln, Percy Lewis, Dot Curtis,
Virgil Bowser, Wilma Bush, Jack
Overall, Anne Bishop, and Younger
Alexander.

Hear

Forums Will Continue Every
Tuesday in March at
Patterson Hall
Miss Augusta Roberts, secretary
of the University Y. W. C. A., will
lead the second of the March
fomms sponsored by the Y. W. C. A.
and Y. M. C. A., which will be held
at 8 o'clock tonight in Patterson
hall. The subject will be "Am I
Right About the Negro?"
Miss Roberts, a native of Georgia.
has been in charge of a number of
Interracial education projects In
the Southern States, and has
brought to the campus, leaders on
interracial problems, among those
being Mrs. Wells Harrington, na
tional Y. W. C. A. secretary, and
an authority on the Negro ques
tion.
James Stevens will preside. Oth
er forum leaders are Dr. Amry Van- denbosch, who will discuss "Am I
Right About Campus Politics," Dr.
M. M. White, who will lead the
fourth forum on "Am I Right About
My Social Relations?" and Dr.
Robert Miles, who will lead the last
forum on "Am I Right About My
Way of Life?" These forums are
being held every Tuesday in March
at 8 p. m. in Patterson hall.

POTTER IS AUTHOR
OF HEALTH ARTICLE

Pre-Medi-

Mining Group To

Hear Engineer

COMMITTEE OF

240

JAMES STEVENS TO
PRESIDE AT MEETING

Authority

U.K. Faculty Club
To Sponsor Dance

ce

sion to He Held
Tonight

Prof. M. E. Potter of the Department of Physical Education is the
author of an article entitled "KenPre-Me- d
Society
tucky's Needs in Physical Educawhich appears
the
Medical tion," of the Kentucky inSchool March
To
Jourissue
nal.
School
The article gives a resume of the
society past activity and present status of
The Pryor
will present Dr. S. I. Kornhauser the secondary school physical eduof the University of Louisville Med cation program in Kentucky.
It closes with a discussion of the
ical school as the guest speaker at
a meeting in the Archaeology Mu- present needs of. the secondary

seum on March 27.
Dr. Kornhauser is one of the out
standing medical authorities in the
state. He is head of the histology
department at the University of
Louisville medical school; execu
tive secretary of the Medical school,
The University of Kentucky club. and a member of the national comcomprising members nf the Uni- mittee on the standardization of
versity faculty, will hold a leap dyes and stains. Dr. Kornhauser
year dance in the Faculty club room, will speak on the topic of
McVey hall, Saturday night from 9
requirements for entrance into
to 12 o'clock, March 14. Preceding medical schools. All students, parthe dance, a social gathering will ents and those who are interested
be held in the club room from 8:30 in medical subjects are urged to
to 9 o'clock.
attend the meeting.
Arrangements for the dance will
be in charge of Robert Salyers.
on
of the
dances. Music will be furnished by
a three-pieorchestra and re
freshments will be served. There
Newell O. Alford, member of the
will be five program dances arranged by the ladles and all break- firm of Eavenson and Alford, consulting mining engineers of Pittsing will be done by them.
burgh, will address the Norwood
Mining society at 10 a. m. Wednesday, March 11. in Norwood hall.
Mr. Alford is a member of the
American Institute of Mining and
Engineers
Metallurgical
and the
Norwood Mining society is the local
student branch of the same organization.
proThe address is Intended
Lt. Gov. Keen Johnson Will mote the present program oftothe InPrincipal Speaker of stitute which is to bring about closBe
First Meeting of Semester er relations between the Institute
and technical schools. Everyone
of Group
who is Interested Is invited to attend the meeting.
The first meeting of the Committee of 240 this semester will be held
at 7:30 o'clock Thursday night,
March 19, in the auditorium of the
University Training school, Elmer
O. Sulzer, director of the committee announced today. Keen JohnTwo new WPA projects, which
son, Lieutenant-Govern- or
of the bring
number in Lexstate, and an alumnus of the Uni- ington the total
and Fayette county to 40,
versity will deliver the principal are being constructed at the Uniaddress.
versity, it was announced by Jack
Dr. Frank L. McVey will preside Maynard, who is in charge of the
at the meeting and in addition to Lexington branch of WPA and the
Lieut. Gov. Johnson's address, talks division of employment. This brings
will be made by three members of the number of men and women emthe committee. Jean Short, Owens-borployed by WPA in Lexington and
Sam Sternberg, Beattyville, Fayette county to 1,290 wilh a semiand Robert Reynolds, Slaughter.
Although a program of talks has monthly payroll of $23,711.
The two Universtiy projects Inbeen planned the meeting is going
to be more of a party, Mr. Sulzer clude repairing and construction of
announced.
Refreshments will be drives, sidewalks, grading and landserved and the members are invited scaping, employing 45 men for about
to bring their dates. A contest will three months and the construction
be held to see who knows the most of a greenhouse, employing 18 men
for approximately six weeks. There
elementary facts about the University. A test will be given and the are now seven projects in progress
person who makes the highest grade on the campus, with a total emon the test will receive a copy of ployment of 217 men.
the 1936 Kentuckian as prize.
The Committee of 240 is a pub- YMCA GROUP TO GIVE
licity committee of the University
ONE -- DAY PROGRAM
which has for its purpose the publicizing of the Institution and proThe YMCA Deputation team will
moting Interest among prospective
visit Elizabethtown
and Hodgen-vill- a
students.
March 17 to conduct a une-dprogram, concerning the topic
GRAD PLACED IN CITY
"Religion for Young People," In the
high schools of these cities. The
Kenneth O. Culdwell. who was group will go under the leadership
graduated from the University last of Bart Peak, secretary of the Uniyear, has been added to the Lexington agency of the Mutual Life versity YMCA.
Mr. Peak will address the
Insurance company of New York.
Rotary club the same day.
Mr. Caldwell will be located at 1310
First National Bank St Trust com- Robert Freeberg is chairman of the
committee.
pany building.
an

Auctista Roberts, YWCA Secretary, Will Lead Discus-

WILL MEET

schools.

TAYLOR TO LOUISVILLE
Dean W. 8. Taylor of the College
of Education will be in Louisville
today and Wednesday attending a
meeting of the State Teacher
Training committee.
WOMEN RIFLERS PLACE TIDED

The Women's Rifle team, which
turned in a score of 493 last week,
the best they had done in two years,
was snowed under by Vermont with
six perfect scores a total of 500.
Washington
and Maryland were
next with a 498 and 496 respectively. Perm State with 472 was the
only team behind Kentucky.

BARRON TO SPEAK
Le Cercle Francals will present
an illustrated lecture In French on
"Les Cathedrales de France du
Moyen Age," at 3 p. m. tomorrow
in the Woman's building. The lecture will be delivered by Joseph
Barron of the Art department.

Kampus
Kernels

WPA Adds New

Projects at U.K.

--

o;

uy

Ellrv-bethto-

Will the persons who received
wrong articles from the
checkroom at the dance Saturday night by mistake, kindly return the same to Howard Jones at
the Men's gymnasium or call Dick
Boyd at 3489. No questions asked.

the

...

The cast for the next Guignol

play has been selected.

Due to the Kagawa lecture, there
will not be a Social Service meeting
Wednesday.
Coach Rupp requests all members
of the basketball team to be at the
Lafayette hotel today at 12:15 pm.
for luncheon as guests of the Lexington Kiwanls club.

...

Thcta Sigma Phi
working on biographies for "Who's
Who in Kentucky" for 1938 must
turn them in by tomorrow or the
project will be dropped.
All members of

.

All girls interested In attending
he W. A. A. dinner, which is to be
held at 6 p. m. Tuesday in the Com-

mons, in honor of the United Stales
Field hockey team, make reservations In Miss Avenll's office by 2
p. m. Tuesday afternoon.
Dinner
will be 40 cents.

...

Dean T. T. Jones wants a good
typist, preferably one who needs
work. Applicants for the position
should apply at the oitice of the
Dean of Men at once.
(Continued oa Page Four)

* Best Copy
Pi jr't r"vc

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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
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lit thf Pnt OffW at Iftlnaton, Kentucky,
niattrr under lh Art of March 1. 1S7B

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1SS F Ond Bt, Nf
York Citv.
Rnn
Wrrr Prlva, Chlrniro; Cull Biill1ln. Av., Frnriro; 81
Blvd., Lot Anfflrii; 1004 Second
Seattle
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Frank Borrifs
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ON TUESDAYS

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K.

AND FRIDAYS

Chirl
MamiHg Editor
Mant'gitig Editor

John Chkisiif.

THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENT RIGHTS MAINTAIN

HF.RF, SHALL

a college degree; in fad lie
never gi.idiialed from liig'i school and yet lie
nnainc Dean of (lie School of Journalism at the
Unhetsiiy of Missoini and later piesident of
lli.il institution. IVili.ips liis gieatest nthie've-ulit, however, was the humiliation of the now
famous "Journalism faced" which is lecognied
as a ctiniion par excellence in the newspaper
wot Id.
And so The Kernel p:ivs its small tiihnte to
the passinp; of one of America's gicatcst jouin-alists- ,
a man who had the wi,ll to pioneer and
t
who conquered in spite of handicaps and

KDITORS

Bnki-- r

ASSISTANT

oh-sla-

les.

"MATHEMATICS AS A PERSONAL
EXPERIENCE"

John ChrlHlf

FPTTOP".

Om-a-

s.

the air with emotion and prejudice. Caution must become the watchword.
Owen D. Young, in a plea for tenieraie
sieech, recently said of politics: "At the end of a
olitical compaign, when men arc tired and irritated and emotions inevitably run high, we
may excuse, even though we deplore, an appeal
to passion and an outburst of irritation. But at
the beginning of this year, with so many months
ahead, may we not ask the great masters of our
political machine, sitting in these great central
power stations which so deeply influence public
opinion, to exercise that conscientious care and
restraint which these sensitive and powerful
modern instruments require?"
Temperate speech will relieve our present day
fears. Today many suffer and are in trouble.
Falsification or warping of facts, when so many
are conscientiously struggling to find their way,
may result in mistakes which will plague us to
our graves.
fills

WALTER WILLIAMS
There has recently come to this desk a booklet entitled "In Memoiiam, Waller Williams,"
which is a tribute to the career of one of America's greatest journalists. This booklet sets forth
in brief the life and achievements of this pioneer
in the development of the press to the (im of
usefulness and unique position as a power in the
world today.
His career was a unique but outstanding one.

I:

('

KY

K

E It

NEE

He never received

By Bt riY Eari.f.
There has recently come to The Kernel a
Oeorrf SrwnefT
Mat Lurrastrr
Leslie Srntt
Clnrlp Dunn
pamphlet with the title, "Mathematics As A
Literary Fditor
rxiROTHT WHALEN
Personal Experience," written by Dean Paul P.
Aunt. Mtrrnrv Fditor
JOY FIXIFRTON
BorlMf Frlllor
NANCY FFCKFR
Boyd. It was originally presented to the InA sat. Boclrty Editor
ELIZABETH KRIEOF.L,
WtitTFRS
diana section of the Mathematical Association
Fllen Coyt
Nell Nevln
France Kerr
fiettr Jackson
Mtlrlred Vrbb
Frances Smith
of America at Hanover, Indiana, May A, 1!)3.",
Borotliy McCammlah
Mildred Gorman
Loutte Payne
and is now reprinted from the National MatheFeature Editor
P"JT,MONT RAMSEY
WRITERS
matics Magazine, February, 1036.
Donald Irvine
Irene Slever
Then Nadelsteln
Betty Earle
Dean Boyd offers a clear, unique picture of
Nes Editor this science in direct contrariety to the impresTHOMAS ATKINS
- NEWS EDITORS
ASSISTANT
sion held by the majority of those who study
C. T. Hertzuch
Dave Salyers
This latter view is retained by
mathematics.
REPORTERS
Audrey Forster
Betty Murphy
Oonnle Blahee
many because there are few who truly underDotaon
Marjorle Reiner
Arthur
Wlaner
William Evana
Frank Burner
Willi Jonea
stand its worth.
Carl Camenlach
Allen Aahby
Herman Dotaon
Robert Rankin
Thomaa Humbl
John Morgan
Dean Boyd states that those who work in this
Stanley Sutton
Jack Kelch
Oraoe Silverman
Jimmy Anderson
Otla Harrla
Virginia Batterton
field arc as detached in their way as is a poet
Sidney Buckley
Raymond Lathrem
Cliff Shaw
Sylvia Skuller
Katherme Hatcher
or a philosopher. The practical man believes
Sporta Editor
JOB QtTTNN
them harmless and only remotely useful. He
WRITE RS
SPORTS
Roger Brown
Mack Hughes
Max Lancaster
cannot see that the l