xt7xwd3pwg7x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xwd3pwg7x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19220602  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, June  2, 1922 text The Kentucky Kernel, June  2, 1922 1922 2012 true xt7xwd3pwg7x section xt7xwd3pwg7x in.

I

FAREWELL EDITION

i

The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOL. XII

LEXINGTON, KY

SU-K- Y

EXTENSION
SHOWS

University

INCREASE

ENROLLMENT

Takes

Place
State
Supported Institutions

Among

Seventy-Fiv- e

1130 STUDENTS ON LIST

Program Being Pushed on
Theories of Popular
Education
With the closing of the year's work
In the Department of University Exten
slon, Professor Wellington Patrick,
gives out the information that
interest has been manifested
in both extension and correspondence
courses and that there has been a
marked increase in enrollment over
that af the last two pears. He says
that more high schools in the state
have praticipated this session than last
High School
in the Interscholastic
Tournaments, the finals of which are
held at the University, annually.
The Department of University Extension was organized three years ago
with Professor Wellington Patrick,
director, Dr. W. D. Funkhouser chairman, Professors L. L. Dantzler,
Rhoads, J. T. C. Noe and Enoch
Grehan, committeemen.
The object of this Department is to
provide at the smallest possible expense and in the most practicable manner the highest type of education pos- (Continued on page 5)

ELECTED

2, 1922

CIRCLE SELECTS

DEPARTMENT SEVEN NEW MEMBERS MATINEE TEA CLOSES

BIO

YEARS

JUNE

jOR

1922-2- 3

John Burks,
Director; Pins Assigned
to Cast and Staff
Re-elect- ed

At a meeting of the Strollers held
Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock on the
steps in front of the Mechanical Hall
the following officers wore elected for
the forthcoming year: John Burks, reelected director; Gilbert Smith, stage
manager; John Albright, business
manager; and Kitty Conroy, secretary.
A financial statement was made by
Burton Prewitt, business manager, on
the cost of the production of "Tho
Thirteenth Chair," and plans were
formulated for repeating that performance at the opening of school early
In the fall.
The report of the committee for
Stroller pins was read and as a recognition for those assisting in the production of "The Thirteenth Chair."
For those who have received a pin for
assisting in a previous production will
have a pearl set In their pin: Mary
Eleanor Morse, William
Peterson,
Finn, Edgar Gans, John Albright, Kitty Conroy and Mary Lyons; pin and
pearl: Frances Smith, Ann Hickman,
John Vogel, Earl Heavrin, Dan Morse,
John Whittaker, William Moore and
Tom Brooks; pin: Nan Chenault, J. W.
Owens, Henry Harper, Gilbert Smith,
Tom Lyons, James Shouso, William
Blanton, Tom Fennell, Joe King, Ed
Gregg, Prof. Carol Sax and Ireno
John Burks, director will
have a diamond set In his pin: J. W.
Owens, stage manager, a ruby; Burton
Prewitt, an emerald.

At a meeting of tho
Circle hold
Tuesday afternoon, tho following now
members were taken Into the Circle
Ann Hickman, Thomas Ballantine,
John Whittaker, Lawrence Beardsloy,
Thomas Clare, Thomas Gregory and
Jack Warren. After voting on these
names at three consecutive meetings
as required by the constitution, those
six men and one girl became members
of the Circle. They have been under
close observation for some time and
have shown by their actions that they
are loyal workers in every cause for
the good of the University, and worthy
to become members of f.he
Circle.
Su-K- y

Su-K-

MOVING DAY OBSERVED
BY

1922

j0R

CLASS

Professors "See Themselves
as Others See Them," in
Chapel Tuesday
The Seniors celebrated what is tradi
tlonallly known as "Moving Day" in
Chapel, Tuesday, this is the day when
the seniors pass from the humble stu
dent rank and defy the dignity and
position of their instructors.
This cus
torn is characterized by a general
"take off" of several outstanding favor
ites or at least interesting professors,
At the opening of Chapel exercises,
five University notables marched sedately upon the stage and took the
honored seats for general inspection
This procession was led by Gus Becker
bearing even in personal appearance
a surprising likeness to Dr. Mcvey;
followed by Frank Wedekemoer, with
a righteous expression and noble smile
suggested in the person of Dr. Bush;
then came Louise McKee, "a la Miss
Wherry;" next was Walter Morris,
wearing a bald headed wig and a particular kind of glasses, distinctive of
Dr. Terrll; and Margaret Smith follow
ed the others, wearing a garb and ex
pression, both suggesting the person of
Dr. Best
The Chapel exercises were opened
by a few introductory remarks by
"Pres. MeVey," who read the morning
lesson, to the tune of the Twenty-ThirPsalm, a sketch of his affections for the
lately deceased "evolution" affair,
which still lies very near to his heart;
after the reading of the lesson he spoke
of a serious mistake made by the
school officials last year by withholding a very worthy holiday from the
students and correcting the mlfctake by
declaring a holiday on next Saturday
at the eighth hour. The president then
Introduced "Dr. Bush," who, with his
ever inspiring voice and manner gave
a brief talk. This was followed by a
side-ligfrom one of Miss Wherry's
recitations which was cut short when
a delegation of the Faculty
Club, composed of "Miss Anderson,"
Katherlne Reed; "Mr. W. S. Hamilton,"
C. V. Watson; "Miss McLaughlin," Red
Huklo, and "Mr. Mikesell" William
Blake; and rushed off tho stage and
caught "Mr. Hamilton's" arm; passed
through the chapel and "Miss Wherry"
joined them. "Dr. Terrll" followed this
interruption with ono of his logical lectures, Introducing to tho school at
lurgo his great knowledge and really
remarkable frivolity. At this laso moment "Dr. Holmes," Joe Jordan, rushed
in just In time for his lecture and public demonstration of his elastic ami
d

Good-Tim-

(Continued on page 5)

SERIES OE DRAMATIC
1

Professor Sax's "The Cast
ing of a Pearl" Given
Thursday
SEASON

A

SUCCESS

Thirteen Entertaining Plays
Were Presented
The matinee programs of the sea
son closed Thursday afternoon May
2G, with the
presentation
of "The
Casting of a Pearl," a play written by
Prof. Carol M. Sax. The cast was
composed of Elizabeth Hopkins, Eve
lyn Kelly, Mary Louise Covington,
Wilna Brown, Thelma
Joe
Wadsworth, W. I. Moore, Jack Warren, Ed Gans, and John Vogel.
The play contrasted the Oriental and
western points of view of the philo
sophy of life. A certain Indian prince,
who represents the Oriental attitude
of giving, has in his possession a valu
able pearl which he tries to give to all
types of western people, but they
are suspicious of his motives and re
fuse to take it. At length a Jew, who
understands both the Oriental - and
to the
western attitudes, suggests
prince that he attempt to sell cheap
jewelry in order to appeal to the
western people. The test was success
ful and the jewelry was instantly
bought up by. the westerners and the
(Continued' on 'page 5)

BAUGHMAN
GLEE

IS (ELECTED

CLUB PRESIDEHT

Organization Com p 1 e t e s
Notable Seasan; $5.00 Prize
Offered Next Year
At the regular meeting of the Glee
In White
Club Tuesday afternoon
Hall the following men were elected
as officers for next year: Earl Baugh-mapresident; Robert Porter, vice
president; Robert B. Clem, secretary
Elbert De- and business manager;
Coursey, advertising agent
The Glee Club this year under the
leadership of President Fendley and
Manager Wilson, has achieved a
notable success. Although it did not
appear on the road In concert as In
former years, the members remained
loyal and attended rehearsals. The
club overcame all difficulties this year
and when it assembles at the beginning of next year it intends to do bigger and better things. Although the
club is losing some of its best talent
this year, it expects to receive new
material next year that will make It
stronger as a organization than It has
even been before.
Tho now officers havo pledged them
selves to work for tho good of tho orga
nization in every way and especially
to promote a lovo for bettor music on
tho campus. Tho club hopes to glvo
short programs In chapel during tho
year and in this manner to oncourngo
an appreciation of music among

No. 31

TOTAL ATTENDANCE AT
U. K- - THIS YEAR 2701
The attendance at the University
gives promise of increasing next year
in tho same ratio as it nas each of the
four preceding years. It Is predicted
that there will be more applicants for
enrollment thnn can possible be cared
for on account of lack of equipment
and scarcity of funds with which to
employ additional professors.
There are now sixty-fivapplicants
on the waiting list for rooms in tho
girls' dormitories and this number
will be greatly Increased during the
summer. The attendance this year is
2701, including summer
school and
model high students
e

SIGMA

XI

SERVICES

INSTALLATION

MTUESDAV

Scientific Fraternity Has 40
Chapters with Membership of 15,000
Installation ceremonies for the new
members of the Kentucky Chapter of
Sigma Xi, national honorary scientific
fraternity recently chartered at the
University of Kentucky, were held in
the Science Building on the campus
Tuesday evening.
Membership in the society is open
only to those who have specialized in
the different branches of science
There are forty chapters in the country
with a membership of 15,000.
The program for the local initiation
on Tuesday evening was as follows:
Entrance of members elect Pro
fessor E. S. Good, marshall.
Address History and Aims of Sig
ma Xi Dean P. P. Boyd, president.
Assent to the Pledge of Members- -

OE TWELVE HUNDRED

Thirty Clubs Meeting in
Various States Instead
of Origional Tvo
INTEREST

IS

GREAT

Seventeen Active Organiza"
tions in The State.
Since the inauguration of the first
membership drive in December, 1920,
by Herbert Graham the newly elected
secretary of the Alumni Association
of the University, the membership of
that organization has increased from
two hundred to twelve hundred.
At that time there were two alumni
clubs, while at present there are thirty
clubs, with several others in the processes of organization. There are
thirteen clubs out of the state, whicn
are located at New York City, Buffalo,
Pittsburg, Philadelphia, Washington,
Raleigh, Birmingham, Denver, Cincin-tanAkron, Huntington, Cleveland and
Evansvllle.
Within the state there are clubs in
Ashland, Carrollton, Frankfort, Hickman, LaGrange, Lebanon, Mayfield,
Louisville, Maysville, Owensboro,
Pineville, Richmond, Winchester, Bowling Green, and two in Lexington.
The clubs, states Mr. Graham, are
i,

(Continued on page 5)

FIVE SENIOR CADETS

elect
Announcement of the Constitution
and Presentation of Certificates of
Membership.
Presentation of New Members to the
Society.
Address Notes on Telurium Pro
fessor R. N. Maxson.
Social Hour.
Following is a list of those initiated.
All are members of the faculty of the
University: Professor A. M. Miller,
head or the Department of Geology;
Professor W. S. Anderson, head of the
department of horse husbandry and
professor of genetics; Professor W. W.
Dimock, head of the department of
veterinary science; Professor D . J.
Healy, bacteriologist; Professor A. M.
Peter, head of the department of chemistry In the Experiment Station; Professor J. W. Pryor, head of the department of anatomy and physiology; Professor G. B. Roberts, head of the department of agronomy, and Dr. F. E.
Tuttle, head of the department or
chemistry.

Three Loving Cups Given to
Cadet Corps at Review

Three silver loving cups given by

the University of Kentucky were presented to tho corp of cadets at closing
exorcises of tho battalion on Stoll Field
at 3:30 p. m., Juno 1. A review boforo
G. W. Road, command
l
ing offlcor of tho fifth area, and his
staff will bo a feature of tho exorcises.
Major-Gonora-

Dr. Frank L. McVoy, president of
sight singing tho University of Kentucky, has been
Next year a course In
announced as speaker for the com
will bo offered in connection with tho
mencement exercises of tho Loulsvlllo
Normal School to bo held Juno 8.
(Continued on pago 5)

Officers of Battalion An
nounced in Annual
Field Day Exhibition
Five senior members of the advance
course of Military Science were presented with commissions of 2nd lieu
tenant in the R. O. T. C. of the United
States army and this in connection
with the announcements of the leaders
of the battalion for next year was the
most important feature of the last
military review of the year held upon
Stoll Field yesterday afternoon. The
men in the graduating class who re
were Gerald
ceived commissions
Griffin, Harold Enlow, William Hutch-ersoEdd Gregg, George Baumgarten.
The officers chosen to lead the
battalion next year are, Ed. Gans,
lieutenant colonel, Dan Baugh, major,
J. E. Wllkins, F. A. C. Thomas and
William Hillen captains. The announcement of the officers was arranged In an unique manner. The
captain sponsor of each company went
into tho ranks of the company and
selected the captain elect, and walked
to tho front of tho company with him.
Company C, which won tho prize cup
the last field day was also (ho win
ner of tho cup presented by tho Uni
versity of Kentucky to tho best company of tho entire yoar. Scholastic
standing, attendanco, and disposition
of tho cadets toward tho Military
feels that they havo closed
a very successful year with unusually
good attendance and interest on the
part of tho cadet officers and the hull- vldual cadets.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Alumni Notes
4

.4

4

J4!

t

.4

J4

4 J4 J4

4

nna will visit uoigiuin, uennuiy mm
fc"intue before returning to America
sometime in August.
-XtX
In n very
M. Elliott Houston,
prosperous banker In Denver, Colorado, President of The Title Guaranty
Company. "Slim" looks as young and
active na he did the day he left College. A few" gray hairs nt the side of
his head Is the biggest change. He
looks as though he might play .i pretty
good end yet.

CALENDAR
Saturluncheon 12: HO,

Lexington, Juno
day Itosulnr)
Lafayette Hotol.
Loxlnston Juno 13
Conference and
CoHokos

ox-H-

by

a.

0

Meeting 10:
Luncheon by

I

in.

Business

150.

Classes

12 : HO--

p. m.

Motor trip 1 n. in
Alumnue Reception for Senior
p. m.
Girls
Open House Fraternities

X

X-

-

Mnjor Albert Smith Dabnev '01, is
p. in.
of
Commandant at the University
Dinner-DancLafayette Hotel
Pittsburgh.
Before going Into nctlce
0:30 p. in.
service during the World War, Major
Dabney was Assistant to the Chair
xX
of
of Medicine and Demonstration
Alumni In every state and in
leceived Anatomy, Vnnderbilt University. He
VoreiRii countries have
D. at Vnnderbilt.
the Kernel during the year, laden received his M.
X
X
with its messages from the officials of
Miss Elizabeth R. Cary '1C. is teachUniversity and of the Alumni Asthe
Hall, Versociation, the class secretaries, officers ing history at Margaret
Ky.
Until last fall she was
of Alumni Clubs, the students and sailles,
North Avenue
their organizations. This last issue connected with the Atlanta, Georgia.
a review of many of the Presbyterian School,
will contain
Miss Mattic V. Cary 11, is Principal at
year's outstanding events.
The Kernel has been directed and Margaret Hall.
X
X
Its policies
edited by the students.
Everett P. Bleidt 'IS is teaching
policies. Its success is due
are their
agriculture in the high
to their efforts. Communications from vocational
Wingo (Graves Co.) Kenalumni and other readers indicate very school at
formerly Miss
nionrlv Mint It has been a welcome and tucky- Mrs. Bleidt was
always and every-- Helen Morris, 'IS.
a cheering visitor
X
where. As the executive head of the
Miss Laurine Wells '21 and Miss
alumni we take this opportunity to
teaching in the
congratulate the Kernel and its loyal Anna E. Lewis 'lfi. are
on achievements of the uigli scliooi ai Asmanu, in .v.
and able staff
X
X
year. It is our pleasure to express
Miss Lucy J. Cracraft '20, is teach- here appreciation of the splendid coin the Madison
operation given in keeping vibrant ing Latin and Spanish
High School at Richmond, Ky.
Kentucky spirit.
the
X4X
Reports from the several departL. V. Burge '20 is teaching physics in
ments of the Alumni Association will
High School, Covington,
be made at the Annual Business Meet- the Holmes
13 at 10:30 a. m. Ky- ing in Chapel June
X
X
A digest of these reports will be printDavid C. Choate '20 is teaching
ed and distributed to the Alumni Clubs
mathematics, language and history in
and the Class Secretaries.
the high school at Florence, Ky.
X
X
X
X
PLEASED
A. & S. ALUMNI ARE
W. W. Boggess '21 is teaching
History and Mathematics, in
Letter from Dean Boyd About Pro- Latin,
Mack-WilMater Wins Approval the Washingon High School at
gress of Alma
Ky. C. E. Lisanby '20 is principal
A letter from Dean Psul P. Boyd to of the school.
X
X
the former students and graduates of
ALUMNI WIN HONOR
College of Arts and Sciences, rethe
plete with news and views of the
XI Research
things that are dear to all followers of Membership in Sigma
Society Is Prize
Blue and White, has drawn rethe
sponses from alumni in Illinois, and
Four alumni are members of the
Florida, New York and Oklahoma,
chapter of Sigma Xi, national research
Germany and points in between.
the UniAppreciation of the progress of the society, recently installed at
was expressed by these versity. This is the second chapter
University
South, the other hav
alumni and a willingness to aid where installed in the
University ot North
possible in the further advancement of ing gone in at the
Carolina a year ago. The organization
Mater.
the Alma
inhas 37 chapters and 15,000 members.
The active interest of alumni is
s
Steps were first taken more than a
creasing as the several deans of
officials year ago to have the local petitioning
and other University
accepted. The Kentucky charestablish a closer touch with their group
ter is in recognition of some very unformer students.
usual research work done by faculty
X
X
of the University.
GIVE TO MEMORIAL FUND
The alumni representatives are Dr.
Litigation Fees are A. M. Peter, George Roberts, H. H.
Men's
Downing and J. S. McHarguo.
Turned in by Peal
e

thir-tcc-

1

X

col-leg-

of $178.88 has been

A contribution

made to the Memorial Building Fund
Men's Club of the
by the
This represents a fund
University.
from 225
raised by contributions
former service men to be used in winning certain concessions for them under the Act of 1920 by the Kentucky
General Assembly. These concessions
were made voluntarily by the Board of
Trustees of the University. Counsel
for the Club advised that measures to
obtain back pay bo dropped.
The check received from W. Hugh
Peal, Trustee, was for the funds collected for this legal procedure. Other
offlcors of the club are H. J. Beam,
president: Harry Sullivan, vice president; and Berl Boyd, secretary.
X

X.

J. Irvine Lyle, '90, and Mrs. Lylo will
sail for England on the White Star
Liner Majestic on June 17th. Mrs.
Lylo, who is convalescing from an
operation for appendicitis, will spend
Kfvm-nweeks with friends in hng
laud. Mr. Lylo is going on business,
l

leaving for a six months trip In California. For several yenrs Mr. Brown
was Cashier with Armour and Company In their Chicago office. He wes
retired about the tiino tho United
States entered tho World War. Ho
then entered tho Auditing Department
of tho Federal Reserve Bank, nt Olon
Ellgn, 111., releasing a younger man for
service. In April 1921 ho removed to
the Country Club, Hinsdale, 111. He
will bo nt home nt Hinsdale on his return from California.
xx
nt
L. L. Lewis '07, is now
721 Carlton Avenue, Plninileld, Now
Jersey. Mr. Levis Is Secretary and
Chief Engineer with the Carrier Engineering Company, 750 Frelinghuyson
Avenue, Nownrk, N. K.
X4--

O. W. "Si" Hollar '12. sends In a
change of address 112 East Street,
Bound Brook, immediately after graduating and has continued In tho employ
of that Company and its allied properties. He was with the American Tar
Products Company, Chicago, from 1915
to 1917. Then nt the Youngstown, O.
and Steubenville, O plants of this
company until 1919 when he took
charge of the Follensbee, W. Va. plant
from whence he returned to his present address.
X

X

Mrs. L. J. Parrlgin (Bess Goggin)
and re'00, sends dues for 1922-2quests that tho Kernel be mailed to her
at Paintsville, Ky.
"My Kernels
have been a bit
irregular of late. I hope this can be
remedied for do not like to miss a
single issue. Expect me at tho Alumni
Reunion in June. Mrs. Ross will be
with me this year too.
"Robert H. Ford '21, is County Agent
of MeLean county and V. H. Rochester '17, is Assistant County Agent.
"George T. Robinson '20, is principal of the High School Miss Elizabeth
McGowan '19 and Miss Corinne Martin ex, are teaching in the Livermore
High School in this County." D. C.
Ross '20, Calhoun, Ky.
1

X

X

.
"Find check for alumni dues
A. C. Stephens, W. W. Haffler and myself, all class of '20, arc in Savannan
with the Central of Georgia Railway
Company, and together most of the
time. We are always glad to hear from
Kentucky and think the Kernel the
best news possible." G. A. McRoberts,
Assistant to Chief Engineer.
1922-23-

XtX

to
subscription
my
"Forwarded
Memorial Building fund on date of
receipt of Mr. Wiley's letter. I am
sorry that I am not able to lend any
aid during the drive but my work
here keeps me tied very close and a
subscription was the best that I could

Cincinnati, Ohio.
At homo after June tenth,
510 W. Third Street, Lexington, Ky.
Mrs. Moore Is n graduate of tho University of Kentucky.
-- X X
John R. Mnrsh lfi, Is now connected
with tho office of Legaro Davis,
Publicity Counsel, 305 Candler Building, Atlanta, Gn. Ills present speclnl
lino of work Is a publicity system for
Georgia Tech.

Dickson Ave., Hon Avon, Pittsburgh,
Penn.

x

X

my nddross from
to Asplmlt, Kentucky. Am
laying out foundations for our nsphnlt
plant here surveys of town Bites,
various ronds, tramways, outcrops of
nsphnlt and land lines. I do not want
to hiIbb getting the pnper. I enjoy tho
notes about tho alumni especially, as
well ns activities of tho University."
X
X
II. B. Popo '05, Civ. Eng'r, Natural
F. H. Boll '19, chemist with the Hock Asphalt Crop'n, Asphnlt, Ky.
Company of Wilwaukee,
aa
Wis. has removed to fiOl Superior
Herbert Green, '19, writes from AshStreet.
land, Ky., where he la practicing law.
Ho says not n word about marriage,
"Tho Kernel seems unusually in- wenlth of any other news his classteresting to me lately. It mny bo
mates crave, but does state his intenmy little brother John Is n tion of visiting the campus soon.
There are only Green adds, "I Intend to subscribe for
graduate this year
two other alumni hero; Andrew Ashby the Kernel."
ex and Fred Peters '20. Mr. and Mrs.
yx
Peters will spend a month at Island
CLASS WILL MEET
VICTORY
and then go to Columbia University
"This is the year set aside for tho
for tho summer. Mr. Peters will reof 1919. For tho
turn of Cloverport for the school year. reunion of the class fully Informed, we
not
Professor Farquhar delivered a splen- benefit of those
"Victory" class, so named bedid address nt high school commence- are the
Saturday evening." cause many of our number assisted in
ment here last
victory over the Central
(Mrs) Anne Crenshaw Phelps '07, the little
Powers, and because of the date of our
Cloverport, Ky.
graduation.
X
X
"Preliminary plans of the class Innumerous sug"Following out the
strongly.
dicate that we will
gestions contained in the May 19 Issue,
heralding
announcements
that the writer and Mrs. Bewlay will Postcard have gone out from the secrestart this week for a motor trip to the event
tary. Chas. E. Planck '19" Free
Lexington and vicinity and hope to
Press, Detroit.
be able to attend the Commencement
next month." Henry T.
festivities
Bewley '01, 1410 West Adams Street,
Chicago, 111.
"Change

3hcp-herdsvll-

Allen-Bradle- y

xx

e

"re-une- "

X

Ven

X

"I am still in St. Augustine, Florida,
as assistant engineer in the M. of W.
department of the Florida East Coast
Railway, where I have been since
craduating in June 1910. R. B. Hunt
'01, is mechanical engineer and T. L.
Pearre is in the construction depart
ment as assistant engineer. I like to
receive the Kernel. It is a very inter
esting and breezy publication, especial
ly the alumni page, as it recalls
memories of bygone days, Speaking of
bygone days, how's this?
"Down on the depot platform, bathed
in the bleak wintry breeze
Shy long of its contents with nothing
inside it to freeze,
Shorn of its former glory, tapped of its
last amber breg
and friendless
Bungless, beerless
stands an empty 8 gal. keg."
B. F. Robinson '10.
X
X
"I often think about the members of

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my class and wonder where they all
are and what they are doing. Give
my best regards to any of them that $4t"$Mi4tH&$t,4t,,$'4f$M$4i,$'l
may be around antl my very uesi
The
wishes to the Faculty and Students of
do.
R. W. Tinsley
Electric Co.
"I have recently been promoted to the University, writes
Assistant District Engineer with tho 12.
Fourth St. Cincinnati, Ohio
Mr. Tinsley has been connected with
Illinois Division of- - Highways with
Electrical Supplies
program the U. S. Department of Justice since
1000 miles of pavement
Wholesale
ahead of us and my allottment 70 miles 1917, formerly in Texas and for the
to build before the snow flies this year. last year in Atlanta, Georgia, address
for the General
Distributors
"I am the only U. K. graduate here P. O. Box 1058. After graduating in
Electric Co.
taught school for two years
days I write a letter back. Am sure 1912, he
J
WARNER P. SAYERS.
so the Kentucky Club meets on the in Kentucky, then spent u year in the
Sec'y, Sales Mgr.
is the most successful year State University of Illinois, receiving his
this
has ever had and believe it is only the A. M. degree there in 1915. Later he
L. V. was instructor in modern languages at
beginning of better times.'
AAAAAAAitAiiiittrlAitAitiiititnlntnlntnliil
T VTTTTTTTT TTTTTTTtt,
vt
the University of Mississippi until enColeman '14.
tering his present employment.
Dues and the Kernel
X
X
.r
tfn
xx
Enclosed find check for two dollars
.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stone Karn reto cover alumni dues for
BALLOTING IS SLOW
For all Former Students
Would certainly like to bo with you port the birth of a son, J. B. Kurn, May
Alumni Secretary. University of
impossible." 25, 1922. Mr. Karn is a graduate of the
13 but It Is
Alumni Clubs will send Delegates to! on Juno
Kentucky, Lexington.
William R. (Pat.) Campbell '20, Scout class of 1912. His wife was formerly
Annual Business Meeting
Spies. They live at 518 V
tit iti A
Executive, Chamber of Commerco, Miss Olive
'V
V
'V
WV
Charleston, S. C.
Approximately 200 ballots in the
X
X
election of officers of the Alumni AsBREWER NICHOLS
sociation have been received at the
"Mm. Anabol Giltne" Brewer, of
They will bo
Secretary's office.
t
hours pro- Danville, Ky., announces tho engagewithin
tabulated
750 Frelinsrhuvsen Avenue.
ceeding the annual Business meeting ment of her daughter, Mary Leigh, to M
C
Mr. Walter Barrett Nichols of that
in Chapel, Juno 13.
Newark, N.
city. The marriage will take place
Delegates are expected at the busiMiss
Boston Buffalo Chicago New York Philadelphia
ness meeting from each of the 30 sometime during tho summer.
delegate, present- Brewer Is well known in Lexington
alumni Clubs. The
Uni- $
ing his credentials, will bo allowed where she spent two years nt tho
MANUFACTURERS OF WEATHER
pupil
one vote for each three members of versity of Kentucky, and as tho
of the
of Forest Dabney Carr and late
his club In good standing.
College of Music."
tX X
with the help of the following KentuchiaB
X fX
J. E. Bolllntc. '15
J. I. Lyle, '96
Lexington have rocoived
Friends in
II. Worsham, '16
E. T. Lyle, '00
tho following announcement this week,
It. Wuterfill, '29
L. L. Lewis, '07
"Mr. Andrew Steele Moore
M. S. Smith, '08
J. II. Bailey. '29
.4.4.
Mrs. Annie Baker Hawkins
W. B. Thornton, '21
R. L. Jones, '12
announce their mnrrluKc
Edgar T. Brown '75, ono of the most
G. E. Zerfoss, '21
R. It. Taliaferro, '13
of the "old grads." bonds his on Tuosduy, May the twenty-thirany says that he is Nineteen hundred and Twenty-tw1922-2dues for

I
I

F.D.Lawrence

5

1922-23-

"41 "l"

learner

forty-eigh-

'

sfc

corporailn

EMjlnecrlig

4

J.

I to make ' Every day a good day ft

Betwixt Us

I

I

sl'l4J44l"l'

d

lm-.-i- l

o

3

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4vH4'K4K4'K,4K4'

sfc

* 3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
turned to sciiool

-

SEASON IN GOOD FORM

Kentucky and 'Georgetown
Tie For Intercollegiate
Honors
By J. Sterling Towles.
The wildcat nine finished their sea
son with the defeat of the Volunteers
of Tennessee in the second of a two
game series. It was the sixteenth
game that tho team had played this
season.
The Cats have made an enviable
record on their homo grounds this
season, but have less fortunate
foreign fields Or tho seven games
that they havo played on Stoll Field
they have lost only one, to Michigan.
They played nine away from home and
won only one of them, from Centre
Tho games that they played and the
results are as follows:
At Lexington:
Kentucky, 0; Michigan 8.
Kentucky 10; Miama 4.
Kentucky 10; Ohio State 6.
Kentucky 10; Centre 1.
Kentucky 8; Georgetown 2
Kentucky 10; Tennessee 7.
Kentucky 7; Tennessee 4.
Away from Lexington:
Kentucky 10; Centre 9.
Kentucky 10; Cincinnati IS.
Kentucky 12; Cincinnati 14.
Kentucky 7; Vanderbilt 10.
Kentucky 0; Georgia 1.
Kentucky 7; Georgia 10.
Kentucky 0; Mercer 9
Kentucky 5; Mercer G.
Kentucky 3; Georgetown 5.
Between Kentucky and Georgetown,
as
Intercollegiate honors went
the Cats beat the Tigers once and the
Tigers beat the Cats once. Between
Transylvania anil Georgetown the results were the same. But Transylvania beat Centre once and Ky. beat
her twice, therefore Kentucky has intercollegiate honors.
Captain Slomer pitched his last
game for the Wildcats against University of Tenn. last Thursday afternoon
on Stoll Field. He pitched a stellar
game and won over the Voir, 10-Slomer has a batting averago of .261
for the season, and is responsible for
many of the victories of the Wildcats.
Lawrence "Dutch" Burnham will
captain the University baseball nine
next year. "Dutch" is a Junior in the
College of Arts and Sciences. He won
his first "K" in 1919 and another in
1920, but did not play last season. He
Is a star second baseman and his
playing has been a remarkable exibi
inn nf finish in a college player. His
record at the bat this season is:
AB-68-

I

,

Riirnhnm failed to hit in but one
game this season. He has received
several offers from professional and
clubs, but it seems
no if "Dutch" thinks more of a "K"
than he does of a salary.
The batting averages of the Wildcats this season are as follows:
G. AB. R. H. Pet
1
0
1
1
Gregg
.426
16 68 14 29
Wnrnham
H 24 5 10 .417
Tinsley
.318
16 66 16 21
Pribble
.289
6 13
45
14
Beam
.268
16 71 16 19
Brown
6
.261
5
9 23
Slomer
.221
16 68 11 in
King
9
.184
49 11
13
Underwood
178
r8
16
Jones
.175
15 57 13 10
Sauer
3
.158
2
8 19
Flealiman
Stokes
Robertson
Miller

4
4

13
9

4

2

.154

1

3

7
3

0
0

1
0
0

.000
.000

C68 107 142

Pergren

.2.5

1

Kentucky Federation of Women's
Clubs Rules Out Resolution
At the twenty-eightnicotine of the
Kentucky Fcderntlon
of Women's
Clubs, held at Hopkinsvllle last week,
n resolution was brought up that the
teaching of evolution In the University should be Investigated. The discussion of tho question ran high for
some time but the resolution was ruled
out and hearty endorsement of the
University of Kentucky and President
Frank L. McVey was given in n special
resolution for that effect.
The substance of the resolution was
as Follows:
"Whereas a committee report entitled 'University of Kentucky under
division of civil servico' has no relation to federation work and,
"Whereas the federation adhears
strictly to a nonsecterlan and nonpartisan policy, and,
"Whereas the committee have faith
in the integrity and confidence in the
management of the University, be it
"Resolved: That we demand the re
port be stricken from the records of
the federation as being Bupprficial, in
adequate and misleading."

"Red" Davidson to Hea