xt7xwd3pzv1h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7xwd3pzv1h/data/mets.xml Kentucky Kentucky Press Association Kentucky Press Service University of Kentucky. School of Journalism 1989 Call Number: PN4700.K37 Issues not published 1935 Aug - 1937 Oct, 1937 Jul - 1937 Aug, 1939 Oct - Dec, 1940 Jan - Mar, 1951 Aug - 1956 Sep. Includes Supplementary Material:  2005/2006, Kentucky High School Journalism Association contest 2004-2005, Advertising excellence in Kentucky newspapers 2003-2005, Excellence in Kentucky newspapers newsletters  English Lexington, KY.: School of Journalism, University of Kentucky Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Press Press -- Kentucky -- Periodicals The Kentucky Press, August 1989 Vol.60 No.8 text The Kentucky Press, August 1989 Vol.60 No.8 1989 2019 true xt7xwd3pzv1h section xt7xwd3pzv1h r ’i‘ ~
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y; ,1; Official Publication of the Kentucky Press Service - Volume 60, Number 8 - August,1989
l l“ ’2} I:
P Ke n t u c k i a n s s h ow st ro n g
allegiance to newspapers
A statewide retail shop- The survey, conducted by The survey was con-
ping habits survey, sponsored by The Preston Group, Inc., of Lex- ducted March 14 - 31, 1989, With
the Kentucky Press Asgodafion ington, shows that nine out of 1,000 households statewide par-
and Kentucky Press Service, re- every 10 Kentuckians readadaily ticipating in the survey. The re- .
veals that Kentuckians are highly or weekly newspaper on a regular sults of the 1989 survey are similar
dependent upon Kentucky news— basis while a similar number pay to the last survey, done in 1987:
papers for shopping information, attention to newspaper advertis— which showed the strength of
ing in Kentucky newspapers, Kentucky newspapers over all
other media.
Summar of Ke Findin s '“e'ehasneve‘beemy
y y doubt about the strength of Ken-
> Newspaper advertising continues to enjoy superiority over other the]? newspapers," said KPA ex-
media. However, some eroding of that strength is apparent. In ecutlve director Davxd T- Th'
virtually every instance when respondents were asked to cite their ompson. Newspapers have long
primary source of advertising information, newspaper was the clear been the backbone 0f many Ken-
winner. However, a portion of its share has been claimed by the thd‘y communities and the alle-
."Other" category, which includes primarily yellow pages and other glance to the pnnttmedla shouws 1“
telephone directories, advice from friends and family, and loyaltyin the results 0f thls survey. Th'
patronizing certain stores ompson noted that readership
had slightly increased over the
> The major media competition - especially television - suffers from past two years when the last 5“"
an increasingly fragmented audience. Nearly 70 percent of shoppers vey was done. .
‘ surveyed have either cable, a satellite dish or both. More than two- 9“ the question 0f where
thirds of this group spend half or more of their time watching cable Kentuckians rely most for adver-
channels instead of local stations only “5mg lhformahOh' newspapers
outdlstanced all other media in
> VCRs serve to further erode the television audience. Overall, 70 almost all 15 categories. 1“ asking
percent of all television households have VCRs and the majority of for spec1f1c media " newspapers,
VCR owners — 52 percent - use the equipment primarily to play telewsxon, radio and dheCt ’hah "
rented movies newspapers were the consxstent
winner. Newspapers‘ strength ,
> Among most likely buyers of specific merchandise mentioned in showed greatest in grocery adver-
(Continued on Page 7)
(Continued on Page 7)
Jilfiififié 9““ P71: (14” he .
33%} 5’5" "thrusts
A‘swuflkfi ,1: iii V»

 Page 2
lemg credit when credit IS due, ’ ‘
' l E‘ 17’ E‘ \1 “ 7' "
KPA changes contest pomts value T 31 A 43 -* N T U C K ‘1
D D "t
In past Kentucky Press Association con- 1") RE: '5 8
tests, newspapers have sometimes been penal- 1m Exocmlva oommmu Districl12
ized by submitting the only entry for a given LnrryCraia Louise Havnaker
category Presidem Jackson Tlmes
' Green River Republican Di atria 13
. . ' hardAnd ‘
In such Circumstances, the newspaper 3&2;ng 3:an Sm:
. was awarded an automatic honorable mention 90“,,me mm Dim 14 '
. and no point value was given to that entry in the cm McDonald Swan Simpson
General Excellence competition. Woe pres-mm ”MW”
' The KPA Contest Committee is chang- ”Ru“ °°“"‘Y “m“ ”M Districns
. . . e . G H lfi H
lng that policy and beginning With the Pall Mary 5mm cmfienavgm ”m
Newspaper Contest, newspapers subrruttmg Effie" e Messenger
the sole entry for any given category will be ' 9"“ ”'u'g'
presented a Certificate of Merit and two points Eypfafgm Steve Lowery
in General Excellence competition, if the judges Henderson Gleaner ”my SW“
deem the entry worthy of the award. Johnwcas
Honorable mentions may still be given '9” ”mfllwm cmmnpm
by judges in categories with a sufficent number Distrim x.
of entries but no points wi]l be awarded for an igfihfimm ”3:: :3: 9:33:31,
honorable mention. Other point values — three 0' . 2 DE idT m
points for a first place, two for a second and one “'2ng 54.,“ 0%?
for a third -- remain the same. Dam" Swims pr09W _ '
Luca Howard
Distrid 3 Members Services Director
. . Richard Hem
It's Lica Howard now WW......... mm...
Distria 4
Jamsmn emu '
No, the Kentucky Press Association cen- % Leader/News Democrat xps Masking Director
tral office doesn't have a new staff member and m 5 Reba Lm
no, the editor of The Kentucky Press didn't err in Coleman Lwe . Secretary/Receptionist
a cutline on summer convention photos. 3mm“ ”M mm“
‘ The KPA Member Services Director is ohms mum orrrcm
Lica Howard, formerly Lica McCain. mam“ mnm WW
If you noticed Lica was in a rush to get _ . Lnnmeks
away from the Summer Convention activities, mvlam mm” "mum”
it's because she was getting ready for her wed— Gamncoumy News grim"? ”SS“
. B ns W
dlng‘ _ . _ Dim: 8:9 Darn/ills Advocate Messenger
Lica mamed Ron (Ople) Howard on fivfifl m M No mm]
July 1 in Frankfort. And if the last name is F 6°" 9°" “56:“ Ham
familiar when thinking about the staff at KPA/ K9" ““1 WWW M9939n9°""‘q""°'
KPS, she is now a sister-in—law of KPA/KPS “MM“ 0““ Dam,
' ' - - Ashland on. Inc.
busmess manager Bonme Howard. mania,” AssociatesDivision Wmm
_ , . AshlendDa lndep nd m
For a while Lica W111 probably answer to w a a
Lica McCain, until, those calling or writing KPA The Kentucky Press (ISSN—OUza-0324) is published monthly
coorect their mailing address, but she‘ll always and second class postage paid at Frankfort, Ky., 40601, and
‘ be used to the various ronounications of her at addifiOI‘al mailing Offica- Subscription Price is 54 Per
P
fi t year. Postmaster: Send change of address to The Kentucky
I'S name‘ Press, 332 Capitol Avenue, Frankfort, Ky., 40601, (502)223-
8821.
For the record, it's pronounced like Lisa. Offidal “Imam“ 0‘ “‘9 Kenmd‘ “955 59M“?

 V
‘ 5 Page 3
KPA, Bardstown host entertaining, educational Summer Convention
it. . " 31;; 3 a. e fit“?! 373‘. ‘1 1H J" ‘ 9 35“.- ‘3 s 3" »
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KPA vice president Celia McDonald and board member Richard Anderkin study
the thought of eating fresh pork barbecue while pig holds partially eaten apple

 .
Page 4
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; 225222.23 2 _ é »_ . ,5 KPA presrdentLarryCrarg grabsachairto
31-3" '2' .n: 1'2. 2 ‘. it“: ‘13"; '2 i § address the gathering for Thursday night's
i) 3.2““? $15 55;: :2,qu .2 5 ‘1 , _. 2 2
232222;. 5212;325:2532. .322 , 5-: ._ barbecue at Maker's Mark
‘ififiéfgfis N2: 422-323 T 22,-‘55272 ‘ s2 '52? '
,2 2.2 «#2‘1’5g5 fixwx‘fll’vfly-‘Q’jy. . “0.2.2- .22.
. gigs? . an“
'32.)...23.“ $2 ,2”: , 2.5.2.22» '
I"- 2‘ 2222.25»: ’2”
1.22222. ”$2222 : . . Photos courtesy of Max Heath
M ”W ’ ‘ , 2.222: .
5 Judy and Don Towles and Bernie
Vonderheide examine a vat
of Maker's Mark whisky
22" ”2:: ' '~ -- [333-2 . .
: 2, 22—. «2.21 2
_ . ? 35125.5..52 ., 5gfia,2,..¢ “ 5 , .2
3 “.52 2. 2 ~22 aux.
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5 gt; 7 fl L.__4. we? 2...; ”1:? “2.1“;
7'2 £212.!" 22—— -2;~:*;2:22?fq .92. ‘;
2 . 2 " 2:27 2 ‘ . "5.2.933 9-4": ,2 , = I
2 .5 ,. 9'21: 222.." 2322.22» «.5...»
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Floe Bowles won the Treasure Chest of prizes
during Saturday's awards luncheon. The
' prizes, donated by various Nelson County _
businesses, was part of a special promotion by
Bardstown and the Holiday Inn welcoming
IG’A to Bardstown

 Page 5
‘1? c“ r; . . “3.2. ;3,,:g:,,.1;%,z»gg ', M511” W‘.’
. 2:, § / ~ My “143,: .. ”a... '.
:- ,«j/:v":,.',v.,’~/::',:’4r,-,,_:’ ‘ ' '3 :
KPS ad director Gloria DaviS, i ,3 , . 1:3;"‘JJIL;Z,"I“ ”we : 5 I. :3, {I
' ', ,::~.~:‘/,E;,;:y, 0,34: ,’ 03K; ' a ,
left, and KPA/KPS board t “M:."" , , ; | 7 , .
member Dorothy Abernathy : ., f” g , W77; , , V, / I V
' Spend time on the frontporch at ”“33; , f ‘ any,” " ”Vi '
Maker's Mark guest hour :fiZ‘.-. i» 2% / n “K
\ . a»... yea»: :2:
k . a, -; ; : . V , .
: a3,» . .
_ MM ' \ V”? ”1,,” '
a: Make... Make ,,
g; , ailflMark- g @Ma , I 34w»: Bob Berryman stands watch of cases
' ‘,-.,._,<.W , .' ’4" M». . .
in” Wflyggggv @ $1,435; e i flaw of Maker's Mark whisky getting ready
Ea; :zufl”3 w W" .1: K42; gig, for shipment
t * l1" * Tiff. .: a
r t r» .‘f 5
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as; : 3 . : 1 :9" .
' . ' V -: ' :' : : ' ’ : 2’ j :1 : ’ ’
Sen- Michael Moloney ' .5. .:-' i " . x ,.
addresses aKPA con- . ' :. : l ' : .l ‘ ii” .' 1 :
ventionforthefirst . ‘ at: * ‘. g ,2, - .
time in 10 years. At .- ' 3%? 3 "cV‘v‘" ' :, a»: 351““ 3 i : .
. . ‘ -:...:,.:' .27 . 3 «vats; : ,3 ' '
left is Senate pre51dent . a", ' : : “3,53 ,’ ,~
pro tem Eck Rose and , j? ' 3 : : , f' ‘V ' ,
at right is Ed Staats, .:- ; ' g 35:31 ' *
sessron moderator and {3;, ‘, , .. :- j '
KentuckyAP bureau - H ~ s : '

 Page 6
~17 21,11,414? k” .1 33154:, 1 111:;
11%;?» .,1; , . ,.
”L11 4 _ ,, ‘1 .4 ' 1 ‘ 4,4 1, Lica Howard, left, KPA Member
3: 4_ 1, 1. ,1 t@ , 3“,, 1 , Servxces Director, and KPA/KPS
, 11 .1 c -4 1 . , 1, .1 busmess manager Bonnie
“:7 31/” ' 1" V ' 1: 1f 11‘1" i4 1‘ Howard, guard their supply of
4, ‘91 1 -; 4;, 1 1, Mg, 2- 4 , keys during the summer con-
a”?! z 15%;”, “it ,; 3,3”; , / a , 1 vention. A key, part of a spec1al
1 1.. 1 . 1 ,% ‘2 a... fry/,1 1 . promotion by Bardstown and
' 4w ' ” ' " 1.3/1 -1 ' 1:33 *5“ 'V” - n
1% ,1 1 111:: 4:141 11,11 ‘11” .1':1,.11‘;.,;1~ j - the Holiday Inn for a treasure
1 ’ 1’ '1'! ‘v 11?. ’ chest" of nzes, was wen to
“2”}; 5533;11': 4141/55 . .21 each person registering for the
_ ,, 41-, i :4; 1.21.35, ‘3'? ’4‘ :5 .1?/1. ,3! meeting. Floe Bowles won the
,11‘ ‘ fit??? 4;” / ' treasure chest during Saturday's
. .4 3.5.», : 4% awards luncheon
' .y ,.,11,.,1, 4 1:~ ' ’2’ \ ' ’1”; ‘1?” 731,1.
I, . . ,.~,\,,,".. It; if; u ,, ' 2,... 711;: 4.
1 4‘11”" 6 , 1 1 ~1 1 714.3111. Photos courtesy _
' ~W~ ; 4 of Bob McGaughey .
11,24,111; - 1 ., 1 3“ ‘. )5 ” 1“,: .44.». “:11; 4,3”:
y; ’1 ‘1" “3 1», 3; .42 >2); .‘ x’i‘i'fiitfi'xfi" f t . -L ‘M‘Wv‘f
2,. 1 T”; r : :33; , .1 ,. « 7v”: .. 1" ”“1; ‘1
, 1.111;; 11,; :; 1:23 1_"‘ ' f a' .113: We , :~" 1, >11"
_ 9.41.111. , w , .;,1 w , 4.,- , w, 1,".
/ “I "3' if .111431 ‘ 4 ‘ m4. . 11 1 1" «3.111;;—
3 ”5,; 1 , 11 “1.1... 1.11 , _ 3: .. ,_ _ ,,_.,1. T . $1". .1
- _ m " ' ’ " .,,. ,1» 4. .1w-1,,,r‘y;1 11 '%fl
TWO Murray ngh 5111- ml; " @ m: 1;“ Jim 1 ,
. M, . 1, 4; . -' .. .... , .,. v r a 41
dents receive checks 11”": 113M m”. 1 ”V 1125M]. . / , g:
for $500 for winning »,.11., , my . 11-3111 / fl!
scholarships from the 2:2: ; 11 ‘ :1 - . n . 1 m , 5,11:- ~ / 4
Kentucky Journalism ”V . _ g .‘ ; 1 a; J _- 1 1 ,1/ ,4 5.”
Foundation for the 1989- 1 1 11: ,1' 11 1 1 1 31;. 1 11.x
1 ./ , ' 47f 1, 11 “W11 1 4
90 school year. They are ..1. . 4, :37 {3,5- l 1.11, 1 . ,1,
Chip Adams and Leigh 1, 1 1 ’ ' ‘ 1; ,_ ,.
Landini, both of whom 3 " 1 1 ‘ 1 _ .1, 6’3;
will be attending Mur- “61%, 1 A: ,-, . .1 ‘1». . ‘1'” W:
ray State University. 3 3!! _ - 1,1,4; .1 E
At right is Steve Austin, ,. g 3 '44., f 3%
KPA past president and 1 ‘ , , . :3: 1 TE;
chairman of the 21.31; ' ,0 1] 3W1: :12»;
schoalrship program. 1 .1 » r m; 1, .4...
Austin is publisher of 15;". 1 ‘ , , WM“ .. 1 1 I“;
the Henderson Cleaner. 3% 9 m ', '33
{2/1 1” 1 1'55 3:1? 4 fl 1
It” 1 4‘1 «'1 1.4,; 74;
' - ’ U ”a
11 1 . I , _ 1..‘

 Page 7
Newspapers stlll tops With Kentucky shoppers
(Continued from Page 1) media," and that the major media have either cable, a satellite dish or
tising with 63 percent relying on competition "especially televi- both."
newspaper advertising for gro- sron, suffers from an Increasmgly The survey showed that
cery shopping information. fragmented audlence. Nearly 70 more than two-thirds of this group
In asking how often percent of the shoppers surveyed spendhalf or more of their time
newspaper readers made pur- watching cable channels instead
chases because of advertising on Of local TV StahOhS only.
TV, radio or in the newspapers,
the survey showed that 52 percent _ _
made purchases in the past month
because of a newspaper ad; 23 summary Of Key Flndlngs
percent had made a purchase be-
cause of a TV commercial; and 11 (Continued from Page 1)
percent because of radio.
. Of all newspaper readers the survey, newspaper is cited as the primary source of advertising
1“ the state, 88vpercent scan or read information in greater numbers than the base sample. In other
spec1f1c newspaper advertise— words, thsoe who intend to make a purchase rely more heavily on
ments, Whhe only nine percent do newspaper advertising than any other source when compared to
hOt read newspaper advertlsmg. those who follow advertising, but don't anticipate a purchase at the
The survey also showed current time. For example, 48 percent of the base sample say news-
that 71. percent Of all Kentucklans papers is the best source of advertising information about furniture.
subscribed to a daily newspaper Among likely furniture buyers, the number increases to 59 percent
and that weekly newspapers. 1“ > Among various items to purchase, newspaper advertisingis most
the state have a good staying powerful with grocery shoppers, furniture buyers, other household
power 1“ the home. . goods purchasers, as well as those seeking hardware supplies, used
on the question of how vehicles, home appliances and clothing. On the other hand, newspa-
long a weekly newspaper 15 kept per does not do well in the new car market. You rank third behind
in the home, 47 percent Of those television and other sources of information
’eadmg a weekly 531d they _keep > Radio, as we found two years ago, continues to have minimal —— at
the heWSPaPer at hand “hm the best — impact on purchasing decisions. Direct mail seems to be
next issue 15 PUthhed and an— strongest in categories, such as household goods, drug and cosmetic
other 29 percent keep a weekly at items, hardware supplies and jewelry
least three to four days. > Based on the survey, opportunities for you come from increased
Newspaper coupons and anticipation of purchase from consumers in several key categories -
the use Of color also play 1mpor- - new and used vehicles; major home appliances; and electronic
tant roles for consumers. equipment
. Seven out Of 10 shoppers > Reader preference for color is so obvious that advertisers should
ehh and use newspaper coupons be utilizing this valuable sales tool
Whhe 73 percent 531d they more > Although people read about as frequently as two years ago, they
likely to read a newspaper adver— are spending less time with each issue. This is trueof both dailies and
tisement If It has color. weeklies. Less time also is evidenced by a growing number of
‘ KehtUCklhhs, area also readers who scan advertising rather than seek out specific advertis-
av1d readers of editorial content in ing to read in greater detail
the. newspapers 1h addition to > Newspapers, despite dominating all other media for advertising
the" faithfulness 1“ newspaper impact, are not satisfying readers' thirst for news. Television’s
advertismg. Local and state news domination proves again the public's desire for brevity and quan—
are read heavfly by newspapers tity. However, newspapers continue to outpace other media in
readers followed by classrfxed ads community news
and obituaries. _ > The impact of coupons continues strong in consumer utilization
Tommy Preston, presi- > Local and state news, classified ads and obituaries hold most
dent Of The Preston ‘Ciroup, 533d' reader interest in Kentucky. News of marriages, sports and hospital
"Newspaper advertismg COhhh' reports rank lowest in the categories we studied
ues to enjoy superiority over other .

 [Lg—El; - - -1: .-——'
g; =- |_ 42-; =_. In
V Gun FAX machine is
waiting to hear from you
FAX Number
Keep this number handy in case you need
to communicate with the
Kentucky Dress Association

 l Page 9
A Collection of tpyesrtypse, er, Typos .
Typos Those little pests * The attorney general‘s Samaritan Hospital to purchase
. that somehow, someway, no office said yesterday that an a stomach pump
matter how hard you try, al- autopsy performed on the ,
‘ ways find their way into your headless body of a man found *The ball struck him on
- newspaper. The New England in Mason failed to determine the right temple and knocked
Press Association bulletin car— the cause of death him cold. He was taken to
ried a collection of these. At Sacred Heart Hospital where x-
least you can be pleased they ’t Weight Watchers will rays of his head showed noth-
haven't been lifted from your meet Tuesday at 7 pm. at the ing
news a er...have the ? First Presb terian Church. . .

P lI-lere's a lookyat some Pleaseusethgilargedoubledoor 1_990 WInter conventlon
irrepressible gaffs from actual at the side entrance WI" be at 'new' Radisson
newspaper and magazine ar— The site of the 1990
ticles: "Hear Paul Lucas. The Kentucky Press Association

complete dope on the weather Winter Convention will be
* The license fee for al- held at the Radisson Hotel
tered dogs withacertificatewill ” Citizens Of Santa Bar— Louisville East, January 18'
be $3 and for pets owned by bara County are faced with a 20-
senior citizens who have not tax increase. MOSt 0f themoney Actually, there is no
been altered the feewfllbe $150 raised will be used for five foot change in the location as ap—
policemen proved by the board but as of _
't The accident occurred August 1, the Hilton Inn East
at Hillcrest Drive and Santa " With 23 1/2 pints, the changed its name to the Ra—
Barbara Avenue as the dead tWO ladies were high players in disson Hotel Louisville East.
man was crossing the intersec- four tables of duplicate bridge Confused? Just waittil
tion you try to find it. The old Hil-
'* The women included ton/ new Radisson is located
” Dr. Benjamin Porter their husbands and children in on Embassy Square Boule-
visited the school yesterdayand their potluck suppers vahd IUSt eff Hurstbome Lane
lectured on"Destructive Pests." Wthh is Just Off 1'64- It's vis-
A large number were present ” Gene Autry is better ible from the interstate, lUSt
after being kicked by a horse hard to find the right entrance.
" The assembly passed More info follows as
and sent to the Senate a bill * The bride was wear- the convention draws nearer.
. requiring dog owners in New ing an old lace gown that fell to _ _ Other future conven-
York to clean up after their pets, the floor as she came down the tion Sites and dates:
in penalty of $100 fine. The bill aisle
also applies to Buffalo 1990 KPA Summer Conven-
' "The sewer expansion tiOh
. *Recenttestsconducted prOject is nearing completion, I line 14-16
byazoologist prove that grass- but city officials are holding Kentucky Dam Vil'
hoppers hear with their legs. In their breath until it is officially lage State Park
all cases, the insects hopped finished
when a tuning fork sounded 1.991 KPA Winter Conven-
nearby. There was no reaction " The ladies 0f the hon
to thisstimulus, however, when county medical society auxil- January 1749
the insect's legs had been re- iaryplanto publishacookbood. Marriott Resort, Lex-
moved Part of the money will go to the ington

 ‘ Page 10
Mark Your Calendar!!
F Se tember 1989' =ll
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
MI
10 11 12 13 c
17 18 19 20' “21’ 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
For KDA's 1989 Fall Advertising Seminar
éoptombof 14—15
Holiday Inn - Hurstbourne Lane - Louisville
Sessions on Layout, Design and Copy
’ and the
1989 KPA/KPS ,
Retail Shopping Habits Survey
' Watch your mail for more information!
Or call Larry Brooks (606) 231-3100 or Lica Howard at (502) 223-8821

 - Page 11
Newspaper Week set for Oct. 8-14
"A Free Press: Democracy's Forum" is A Free Press:

. the themeofthe 1989 NationalNews a erWeek I

V to be observed October 8-14. NationalIIilewspa— . emocracy S Forum
per Week has been sponsored annually since ' : 533 E

Q 1940 by Newspaper Association Managers Inc. E 22 5.3
(NAM), a professional organization of the ex— E §§§__§
ecutive heads of state, regional, national and 2E ‘ —-EEE
international newspaperassociations headquar- E E __ 2 g “4'“
tered in the US. and Canada. :_ — ‘ , 37.7

Throughout the week, newspapers will _' 5““ ”A“: .:
remind their customers, readers and advertisers " “‘33?
of the services newspapers and newspaper ;
people provide and the freedoms they protect. 5M " “
Manynewspapers will also recognize and honor '
their staff during this observance. NATION u NEWSPAPER h} '

Saturday, October 14, is International OCTOBER 8-14, 1989
NewspaperCarrierDay,sponsoredbytheInter- and activities, in-house ads and other promo-
national Circulation Managers Association. tional material.

NAM offers newspapers a full press kit The National Newspaper Week press
for National Newspaper Week that includes kits are available through the Kentucky Press
camera-ready materials, comic strip characters Association at no cost to members of KPA. To
and editorial cartoons, suggestions and an out- order a press kit, contact Lica Howard, (502) -
line for National Newspaper Week programs 223—8821.

KPA to su pply etateWides on hard disk
: ' ' . : The Kentucky Press Association Board :5 i: W1th25 t930 classifieds placed in participating
'ofDirectors approved the purchase ofasecond 2’ WWSPWEY?’ each W991“ . . '_ i '
MacIntOSh typesetting system forl'th‘e KPA/ ’ rifl'T-he funds from the ClaSSIhEd program
KPS Central Office so that ads placed through" are equally ,_d1V1de‘_i between the Kentucky
‘the‘fKentucky Statewide Classifiedl’rogrami- thmabm Foundation and the KPA 14931513”
"can be typeset for newspapers. gag-igj-hve Fund :. ‘ , '
j ' Discussion before the board atb'bth the: ‘ 35 3Th15 program has allowed a substan-
ijarch and JUneme'etings indicated that more] tial inficreasein the scholarshlp amounts Of'
'newspapers would be willing to'participatéin fared Ehhf’ugh t1“: KehthkY Journalism FOUh‘
the program and that supplying the classifieds ‘ dationgprogram, Sald Da‘f'ld T- Thompson,
a. on hard disk would save newspaper's T_'quite a ' 9’“??th director 01: KPA Once the present
'bit":' of typeSetting time. p -> V; . >:_cycle'is' completed, we 11 be givmg $21,000 per
* 1' The new service is to begin inI'the near yearin $Fh°13r§h1P§ t9 Phht Joprnalism majors
\ iftitureflonce a“ Questionnaire C'olnCerningftheu. atflvev state universitlesf Additional funds are
newspapers v‘vithaMacIntoshsy’st’ern’and win: also 31584 for ‘KPASI lgbbymg efforts durmg
'ingne'ss to participate is complet'edii5iiE32??? General Assembly 59510115- '
353:": j : 3'23'The statewide program begafi':ih JUIY; V. V - Tm” to 1984" We had to {151‘ ““7st"
”1984, and presently has about 75 newspapers ._ Vpers tQ'thhUtf to the S’Ch‘31‘1‘r31‘113in“.l leglf"
with over 1 million circulation‘parti‘cipating. ' ' lative‘programs, Thompsonadded. Withthls
C'In'the first '18 months, :the'network av— : 1n place,fiour efforts in those areas have been ‘
erage 12 ads per'week. In the pastthréé year’s, ' $91f'hlhded-",¥ ,. V I: r : ’ ‘ : .
however, the network has grown substantially Plans also call "hr KPA to supply news
-:':: .. :, : . : releases on hard disk later this summer.

 ‘ Page 12
KENTUCKY PRESS ASSOCIATION
1989 Fall Newspaper Contest
Entry Deadline: September 1
CLASSES
Weekly Division
Published One Day Per Week
Class 1: Weeklies with a certified circulation of 3,000 or less
Class 2: Weeklies with a certified circulation of 3,001 — 4,700
Class 3: Weeklies with a certified circulation of 4,701 or more
Matti-Weekly Division
Weekly newspapers published two or three times per week, regardless of circulation
Daily Division
Published Four Days Per Week Or More .
Class 1: Dailies with a certified circulation of 10,000 or less
Class 2: Dailies with a certified circulation of 10,001 - 25.000
Class 3: Dailies with a certified circulation of 25,001 or more
For Period: July 1. 1988 through June 30. 1989

 . Page 13
9. Be sure to fill out the entry form and retum it with
RU LE S your entries and payment.
1. Entries must be postmarked no later than Sept. 1,

. 1989. ' 10. Type information for each entry on a label (en-

closed) and affix securely on the upper righthand

l 2, Contests are open only to paid-up member news- corner of the page where the entry is located. Make

T papers of KPA. To be eligible, stories must have sureitdoes notcover some important area. Oneach
been written by full- or part-time employees of the identification label, enter (a) Newspaper Name, (b)

i newspaper submitting the entry at the time the Contest Number, (C) Division, (d) Class, (e) Writer/

‘;' material was published. Work by wire service em- Photographer Name.

I ployees or syndicated writers may not be entered. '

v . 11. All entries, except winning entries, will be re-
3. A newspaper's entry must be accompanied by tainedbythejudges. Plaquesand certificateswillbe
payment for all entries in the contest. Please com- presented at the Winter Convention, and all win-

‘ pute carefully. There will be no refunds. ning entries will be listed in a special edition of The

. Kentucky Press, also available at the Winter Con-
4. Contest publication period for entries in the vention awards presentation.

Fall Contest includes issues published July 1,

1988 - June 30, 1989. 12. Mark the story or picture with a HEAVY RED

check mark above the entry. Please mark with a red

5. Separate sets of tearsheets or complete copies of marker to Clearly define the entry.

issues must be furnished as indicated in each of the _ , _ ,
individual contest categories. Newspapers should 13' Appropriate plaques and certificates Will be
anticipate the submission of entries in the KPA con- awarded t9 wmnersmeach contest @93in plaques
tests by saving tearsheets as prospective contest gomg to first place Winner and certificates to sec-
entries appear through the contestperiod. Machine 0nd, third, and honorable mention: Honorable
copies of entries are not permitted without specific mention is not necessarily awarded in each cate-
authorization in advance of the judging. Do not gory.

send clippings or scrapbooks. 14. In the event only one entry is made in any
6. No entries in an writin or hoto a hic cate- category foraspecific c1ass,acertificateof meritwill
gory shall be entere)d in anotgher cgtegog ogdivision be awarded 1“, th‘“ category lf the judges determine
and any entry is strictly limited to one category ‘t to be a quality entry.

only. For example, a sto submitted for News , . , , _

Story category may notbe erd’tered in judging for In- 15' AI: entry "all” disqualified If: _ .
vestigative Story, etc. All newspapers entering the _ the entry ‘5 “0t the required date as 1nd"
contest must be aware that submitting the same catedpi the “11“,;

entry in two or more separate categories or divi- the entry 15 “Of properly marked.

sions will result in disqualification of that entry _ .

from consideration in any category. Individual If an entry 15 entered in the wrong category, KPA
entries must be made only by the newspaper of “93'1"“ therightto move the entry Into the appro-
origin. pnate category.

7- Onceyou have selected your entries and properly If you have questions, contact Celia McDonald

. identified them, Package all together in a single at (502) swans; or Lica Howard or David T.
packet and mail on or before September 1, 1989 to: Thompson at KPA (502) 223-8821
.. Contest Committee
Kentucky Press Association CATEGORIES
332 Capitol Avenue
Frankfort, KY 40601 Newspapers may submit more than one entry in Carr;

8. A contest entry fee of $10 is required for each "'5 1'12: but a writer '5 name may "0‘ appear 0" "10‘5”
newspaper entering the contest, regardless of group than two “hi5 per category. Although bylines “’5 710’
ownership. A fee of $4 for each individual entry is mandatory, the name offhe 1071-th) must be Included on
to be paid for each entry in each contest category. the label for the entry since the writer '5 name. as well as
These fees go toward payment of plaques, certifi— the name of the newspaper, Will appear 0" P144119“ and
cates and judging expenses. cvfifimtes-

 Page 14
. Category 1: Best Editorial from a different issue of the newspaper, each con-
Submit as your entry full-page tearsheets clearly taining a variety 0f subjects. The three tearsheets
marked. Editorials must be locally written and will ShOUId be stapled together and tabbed 35 one entry.
be judged on communityinterest,clarityofthought, The columns must be written by a staff member 01'
and style of writing. regular local columnist for your paper. The column
should be a balance between humor, entertainment,
Category 2: Best Spot News Story and information. The writer has considerable lati- .
The stories submitted for this category should be of tude in this ““3800“ Entries Will be judged 0“
unscheduled events, for which no advance plan- indiv1dua11ty, style 0f wntlng, and SUblECt matter.
ning was possible, such as accidents, fires, natural
disasters or other breaking news events. Submit as Category 7: Best Sports Column Under
your entry a full-page tearsheet with the best spot Regular Heading '
news story by any writer clearly marked. Judges One entryshould consistof three full-pagetearsheets
will take into consideration SUCb points 35 thor- from different dates with column clearly marked.
oughness 0f reporting, sentence and paragraph Columns must run as a regular feature in your
structure, and impact of headline and lead. newspaper and must be written by a Staff member
or local columnist. Originality and style will count
Category 3: Best General News Story highly in lUdging-
The entries in this category shoul