xt7z08635q0s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z08635q0s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19291127  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 27, 1929 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 27, 1929 1929 2012 true xt7z08635q0s section xt7z08635q0s tmw
I

Jit

f
f

'

$

-

Best Copy Available

j

r--

y

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

THANKSGIVING
EDITION ,
VOLUME XX

--

UNIVERSITY
12

Pages Today

LEXINGTON,

THANKSGIVING
EDITION

OF KENTUCKY

KENTUCKY

NOVEMBER

27, 1929

NUMBER 11

Kentucky, Tennessee Renew Old Gridiron
Feud Thursday Afternoon on Stoll Field
3

Pajama Parade, Bonfire Feature Tonight's Pep Meeting Annualg Classic to Draw

Crowd

Record-Breakin-

SUKY SPONSORS

The Wildcat Mentor

MAMMOTH RALLY
FOR HOMECOMING

Colorful Homecoming

Football Spectacle Between Ken- tucky Wildcat and Tennessee Vol Gridiron Immortals Will Find Blue Grass Queen City
Decked in Brilliant Decorative Attire

Thanksgiving Crowds Will
Witness Demonstration
Of University Spirit
DOWNTOWN SECTION
WILL BE DECORATED

Organization Offers
Silver Loving Cup as
Fraternity Prize

Campus

ft

SuKy Circle will sponsor the second mammoth pep meet, bonfire,
and pajama parade at 1 o'clock tor
night In the Men's Gymnasium, In
preparation
for the homecoming
game between Kentucky and Tennessee Thursday.
The first part of the pep meet
will be held in the Men's gymnasium
where the cheer leaders will coach
the students in yells and cheers.
The band will be on hand to play
the school songs and assist the cheer
leaders in any way possible. Coach
Harry Damage will be there with
his team in full force and fine shape
to show every one "our team."
From the gymnasium the assemblage will proceed to the adjoining
vacant lot between that building
and Limestone street, where a large
pile of wooden boxes will be burned.
These boxes were gathered by the
freshmen of various organizations
on the campus.
After the bonfire the freshmen
will don their pajamas and parade
through the main streets of the city
perform various . humorous
. and
stunts and dances'. SuKy wishes to
.urge the students not to damage any
property during this demonstration.
This pep organization of the University Is working in cooperation
with the downtown merchants to
have .them decorate the exterior and
windows of their establishments
with the colors of the two schools.
A committee has been appointed for
this purpose with Ted Cassidy as the
chairman.
Information booths will be placed
at both the Phoenix and Lafayette
hotels tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock
and they will remain there until 1
o'clock.
Visitors may obtain any
type of in.ormatlon
from these
booths.
Large balloons with Kentucky and
Tennessee pennants tied to them
will be anchored over the stadium
at Stoll field tomorrow afternoon.
They will float and bobble with the
breeze and will add a great deal of
color to a game that Is already
fraught with a glamorous atmosphere.
After the "best band in Dixie"
marches at the halves with the drum
major proudly strutting his stuff,
the passing of the beer key will take
place. On this keg is painted the
scores of Tennessee and Kentucky
games for many years.
A beautiful cup, which is now on
display in the Tavern, will be award
ed to the Greek Letter organization
that has the most artlsticaly decorated house and grounds. The exterior of the fraternity and sorority
houses will be judged at 11:30 tomorrow morning by the committee
chosen by SuKy. This committee
is composed of Prof. Enoch Grehan
and Miss Helen King.
Due to the fact that several other
dances are being given this week,
SuKy has decided to postpone the
dinner dance that they were planning to give Friday night. However
a definite date has been set for the
occasion and it will be held December 6 , at one of the local hotels.
r The SuKy Circle Is a comparatively young organization, its age being
nine years. It was founded in 1920
by 'Daddy" Boles, who saw the need
tjt n pep organization at that time.

NEW STRUCTURES McLean Stadium Expected to House 18,000
Lexington Takes On Gala Dress
Fans for One of Most Important Tilts
For Thanksgiving HolidayGame TAKE FORM AS
On Thanksgiving Day Calendar

Marrw GAMAGE.
Coach Harry Gamaare.
pictured
above, halls from the University
ui ""Jims, wnere ne learnea nis
football under 4appKe. since
coming: to the University of Ken
tucky to coach the Wildcats, his
teams have been growing more
powerful and respected in the
Southern Conference. This year
s BlHe am
fhJSfi the best season a Ken
tucky squad has experienced in
many years.

LOCAL

By C. E. BARNES
When the natives from the sister
state to the South journey up to the
queen city of the Blue Grass tomorrow for the football classic of
the year, they will find little "Miss
Lexington" all dressed up in her
colorful gown of a gracious hostess.
Plans have been completed to dress
the city with multitudinous bundles
of bunting in consideration of the
alumni and visitors returning for
homecoming. The town will not be
painted with the conventional red,
but the colors of the competing state
universities will predominate.
Instead of the usual haphazard
decoration of buildings in the down
town section, this year a standard
scheme of decoration has been work
ed out. A multicolored shield, fea- i
turinir the colors of the two unl- verslties, and bearing a "K" and a
"T" has been endorsed by student
leaders and business men as the
Every business place in
standard.
the entire city ha demonstrated its
.loyalty to the University by making
special endeavor to surpass all
others in a blaze of color.
Inspired by the loving cup offered

COLOR Holiday Penalty

HAS NEW SONGS
Eight University Students
Are Added to Cast of
Dramatic
Organization's
(all Production
With the rehearsal of the second
act of "Local Color," Stroller production, to be presented the week
of December 16, at the Guignol
theatre, two more songs hits have
been introduced into the play. "Its
All Greek To Me" and "The Paddle
Brigade" are the new songs recently
adapted to the play.
Four co-eand four men have
been added to the choruses. They
include, Elizabeth Tinsley, Shirley
Grief, Lola Combs, Lucy Davis.
Thornton Helm, John Epps, Wilbur
Houoway, ana Darrell C. Hurd.
Pictures of the principals of the
cast are being made this week by
Deacon and will be placed on display downtown in the near future.
These will also be included in a roto
gravure section of the Louisville
Herald-Pos- t,
which will appear soon.
The principles in the play, who are
being photographed
are: Misses
Florence Morris, Evelyn Gall, Mary
Virginia Willis, Alice Bruner, and
Frances Baskett; and Elbert Bell,
Earl Cella, Joe Allen, Charles Good
man, and Jack Smith.
Costumes for the chorus are to
be made by the Home Economics
department of the University, and
will be very elaborate
in design. Tickets will be placed on sale
within the next two weeks for all
the performances. James Dorman,
business manager, Is in charge. Details of the ticket sale will be announced later.
The scenery which is under construction in Memorial hall, is near-in- g
completion under the supervision
of James Thompson, stage manager. Plans for the lighting are being made by Irmen Fort, electrician.
Morris Scott, publicity manager,
has announced a meeting of the
publicity staff at 4 o'clock, Friday
afternoon, at Patterson hall. At
this time, extensive plans for advertising the production will be outlined.

Will Be Enforced

PHI MU ALPHA
HOLDS PLEDGING
Honorary Music Fraternity
University
of
Selects
Initiates at Phi Sigma
Kappa House Meeting
music

fraternity of the University, held a
pledging exercise at 2:15 o'clock
Sunday afternoon at the Phi Sigma

Kappa house. The new pledges
were: Earl Michel, Forest Coleman,
James Barlow, Robert Holt, Bruce
Forquhar, Scott Davenport, Joe Mc- Gurk, Joe Conley, Kern Patterson,
Morris Smith, and William Ardery.
Phi Mu Alpha was founded at the
Conservatory of Music at Boston,
Mass., October 6, 1898. Today this
fraternity has 45 active chapters.
Phi Mu Alpha has been active at
the University since December 13,
1922, when Sigma Tau, local music
fraternity was granted a charter,
and was installed as Alpha Gamma
chapter of Phi Mu Alpha.
This organization alms to culti
vate an interest In music and in
musical activities on the campus.
Professors Carl Lampart, E. G. Sul-ze- r,
and C. L. Robinson, are faculty
members and advisors of this fraternity., The active members in
clude: Eugene Royce, president;
Irmen Fort,
Eldon
secretary:
Ray Mays,
Durand,
treasurer;
Norman Hainsey, Toy
Sandefur, Wilbur Wortman, Claude
Walker, David Young, Robert Goad,
Gayle Hammond, Earl Scuff, and
Laurence Alexander.
Phi Mu Alpha sponsors several of
the Wednesday evening radio programs heard from 10 till 11 o'clock
over WHAS, Louisville. Earl Senff.
one of Its active members is writing
the music for "Local Color" and
derstanding that they would bring Eugene Royce, president, is arrangtheir share of the com. wo are hav- ing the music for the orchestra for
ing the boys from Tennessee up "Local Color."
with the same understanding.
The point of all this Is: modern
youth is no different from the youth
of the days of the first Thanksgiving! The accusation that the modern ago does not appreciate the
spirit of Thanksgiving is unfounded.
Mrs. Frank L. McVey will enterIf you don't believe this is true, tain with a homecoming tea at Maxnight after the well Place directly after tho game
listen tomorrow
dance another custom we have between Kentucky and Tennessee
adopted from the celebration of the Thursday afternoon. All of the
first Thunksglvlng and see if you Alumni who are buck for the game,
don't hear this song of Thanksgiving faculty and friends are welcome to
from hundreds of "spirited colleg- attend. It has become a custom for
tho president's wife to entertain
ians:
with a tea directly after the homecoming game each year. Many of
"Glorious! Glorious!
the alumni are expected to be back
One keg of corn for the four of us
Glory be to God" etc.
and Mrs. McVey extends her kindest
invitation for all to attend the tea.
Isn't that Thanksgiving?

A Keg of Corn for the Four of Us
Is Theme of New Song "Glorious"
By MORTON WALKER
"For the abundance of turkey, for
the friendliness of the Indian, and
for the plentifulness of corn are we
thankful, and for this do we set
aside a day of Thanksgiving." Thus
said our Puritan fathers. And for
some of these same things are the
college students of today thankful
particularly for the plentiful corn.
Turkey doesn't bother us any
more, since no one but the Book
Store staff can afford It any way.
As for the Indians, another bunch
of scalpers furnish us our corn. But
nevertheless, in all the world over
today and Thursday you won't find
a more thankful group than our
State College boys. For while our
Puritan ancestors invited the savage
Indlatt to make whoopee with them
oa Thanksgiving day, with the un

circle, of the University for the best decorated fraternity
or sorority house, the various fraternities and sororities are dressed
in gala attire. Hundreds of feet of
bunting have been used in an endeavor to present the best possible
appearance to the visitors.
The local pep club, hot to be outdone by the colorful appearance of
the "best band in Dixie," have planned to form a mammoth' figure representing the letters of the two universities in the stands during the
Intermission. The "Hell Hounds,"
local pep fraternity will be dressed
In blue and white and will so arrange the student section that cards
bearing the colors of the University
may be manipulated with the desired
effect.
Some plans had been made to
dress "Fuzzy" the wildcat football
mascot In a manner befitting the
holiday but "Fuzzy" had ideas of
his own about being attired with a
blue necktie, so In consideration of
his bashfulness the project has been
dropped. With this single exception,
the University is putting on Its best
front for the holiday game.
Su-K- y

Homecoming Tea Is
Planned After Game

Raising of Steel Girders
Latest Improvement on
Mammoth Library
JOHNSON

LABORATORY
NEARING COMPLETION

Training School
Will Be Ready for Use
By Next Fall

Teachers'

GAMAGE AND HIS "LITTLE BOY BLUES?
HAVE HOPES OF WINNING FINAL GAME

Volunteers To Present McEver,
Prospect; Wildcat Stars Are in Excellent
Condition for Historic Encounter
All-Americ- an

By Laurence Shropshire

With every single inch of seating space, standing room,
and aerial platforms within the confines of historic Stoll field
The opening of the 1S29 school already reserved for the game, an Orange team
and a Blue
term found the University of Kenteam, representatives of the Universities of Tennessee and
tucky in the midst of a
building program. New structures Kentucky, will trot onto the field at 2 o'clock on the afterwere taking form and there was a noon of Thanksgiving day for the twenty-fourt- h
annual regeneral hum of industry on the
campus. This progress has been con newal of the Turkey day football feud between these age-ol- d
tinued through the weeks since the gridiron foes. Some sixty minutes of playing time later, anUniversity opened its doors to the other link in the chain of friendship between these sister instudent body.
stitutions will have been forged and the battered "Beer Keg"
Back of the Mining Engineers
building a network of steel beams will be proudly stored in a trophy case by the victorious team,
gradually is taking the form of a there to remain until the rivals meet again in 1930.
skeleton which sometimes will be the
Ah, what a battle I It will be a
TW
two-ye-

new library. This building will be,
when completed, the largest building on the campus with a capacity
of 1,000,000 volumes. There will be
included in its construction the most
modern developments in library construction and it will answer all the
requirements of a real workshlp.
Part of the structure will be devoted
to departmental and special research

rI
lYllJ

17

momentous struggle of superlatives,
tne most hnportant game through- out the length of the country, bring- 17V II A V tog the greatest team that has ever
17AP
borne the name of Volunteers
ILIlilYJuI
; against
the strongest of all Wildcat
teams before the largest
most
Scavenger of Hidden Secrets enthuslatlc crowd in the and
Kentucky
Upon athletic history; and one inciting at)
Is Ready to Spring
Chnrjirtcr and Renukition the same time the sincerest hope.
CO-E- DS
worK.
uiiu mic Hiuvcat. xeuis. ju uuys win
With Savage Fury
Thanksgiving ever come!
The library will be made of con
drum-sticcrete, brick, and steel. The front
Bcforo the
Beware the Kanspus Kat, that find wishbones battle of
ON U.
has subsided and the
will face the north and the rear of
soayengl r of hidden .secrets which
the football stadium, and vUl-bfi- .
fkt- rlH bnnn.c oil otiA teiis allJ other conflict will begin to rage,
ouiiuiumcu uy luu columns. xne
Kathleen Fitch Will' Lead road which has been obstructed by Beware his sharpened claws and one that will either topple the
Women Journalists in Edit- the library will not run In front terrible teeth, for he lurks in hidden
building when completed.
ing Annual Theta Sigma of that walks probably will replace spots today, ready to spring upon i feated untled tne
country
teams m
Gravel
Phi Kernel
It as it Is a custom for modern col- the unsuspecting victim with a or gam for them the southern
heretofore unequalled in ference championship laurels and
leges to eliminate as many internal
the history of his wanderings upon nati0nal recognition. Coach Harry
Theta Sigma Phi, woman's honor- roads as possible.
the University campus. Just now
ary journalistic sorority at the UniThe new library will be 160 feet he is locked safely in his cage, but Qamage and his "Little Boy Blues"
11
attempt to accomplish the
long and will occupy 1,000,000 cubic he paces back and forth at the bars,
versity, will edit the Kentucky Kerformer feat and prove what is
(Continued on Page Twelve)
for Turkey Day to arrive readv acknowledged bv thousands
nel next week. This Theta Sig ediso that he may roam the campus 0f ioyai Kentucky supporters that
tion of the Kernel has grown to be
with untrammeled freedom, striking the Wildcats have the best team in
an annual custom with the woman
character and reputation with sav the South and one that can and will
Journalists of the University. Kathage fury.
beat Tennessee.
leen Fitch has been named editor-in-chiLast night Edwards M. Templin,
18,000 To Attend
editor of the Kat, informed The
Never before have the musty
The remainder of the staff is as
Kernel that he Is ready to loose his pages of history with
their many enfollows: managing editor, Lois Pur-ce- ll:
scandal sheet at first break of dawn
managing editor, George Hailey, Staff Member Thanksgiving Day. He prophesied lightening features revealed such a
assistant
seat sale as the one
Of United Construction that the forthcoming edition will be record-breakiKatherine Phelps: associate editors.
attended the current
Bernlce Byland, Katherine McWll- Company, Will Speak to at once the delight and embarrass- that has clash. The 10,000 reserved
llams and Margaret Cundiff; news
ment of many campus figures who seats and boxes in McLean
Faculty and Students
stadium
editor, Frances Holliday: assistant
escaped undue notoriety in
have
news editor, Louisa Bickel; society
that
George H. Hailey of Cincinnati, a former editions. It is understood pureditor, Henrietta Stone; assistant
PROBABLE LINEUP
Editor Templin has decided to
society editors, Margaret Treacy and graduate of the University College chase a ticket on the Southern railNo Kentscky Pos. Tennessee No
Lillian Combs; sports editor, Billy of Engineering in the class of '01, road which he hopes will carry him
28 Andrews ...LE
Hug 26
Whitlow; assistant sports editors, and staff member of the United from here to there and will keep 52 Wright ....LT Johnson (c) 11
Maude Van Buskirk, and Eleanor Construction Company, will address him there from now till then.
30 Forquer . . . ,LG. . . . Thayer 24
Swearingen; special feature editor, students and faculty of the Engine39 Colker
The writer looked In on the mon0.... Finney 37
ering College on '"A Quarter CenSara Elvove.
Fuller 21
RG
ster last night and observed a few 54 Rose
Several girls who are Interested tury of Engineering," at the regular things worth mentioning so that
51 Drury ....RT. . Johnston 22
engineer's assembly meeting In Mein journalism but are not Theta
may be 56 Yates
RE.... Brandt 31
Slgs, have been asked to help with morial hall at 10 o'clock this morn- - those who are forewarned
48 Splcer
QB
Dodd 17
the
One
this edition. Those who will aid in Int. Mr. TTnilpv will ramaln 4n Tov forearmed. entitled of "Lovescandalous
letters of 27 Covington cRH... McEver 28
articles Is
clude, Virginia Schaeffer, Louise ington for the Tennessee-Kentuck- y
44 Kelly
LH.. Hackman 15
It is an
Mr. Hailey's an Interiordecorator."
Thompson, Betty Huelett, Edna game tomorrow.
Mary Virginia Hailey, is Pse of tne amorous activities of 88 J. Phipps ..FB.... Disney 16
Smith, Virginia Dougherty, Emily
Referee Lambert, Ohio State;
a Junior in the College of Arts and someone who is not supposed to be
Hardin, Hazel Baucom, Edythe ReyWessling, Kenyon;
Umpire
nolds, Mary Lou Renaker, Louise Sciences and has been active in ex- - interested in the single standard,
Headlinesman Maxwell, Ohio;
affairs since her nr. Then there is a confidential diary
Schmitt, Harriet Drury, Virginia
and Field Judge Wcjls, Michiwhich will whiten the hair of those
rival at the University,
Hatcher, and Ellen Minlhan.
gan.
Mr. Hailey has been a widely who recognize their secrets marchknown member of the civil engineer-ln- g ing proudly upon a printed page.
Interesting features have been completely sold out for
One of the
profession for many years and
has had charge of the construction Is a picture of one of the sweet more than three weeks and the temMcVey
of many railroads throughout the young things who is a campus porary bleachers erected at both
south.
In his characterization--, celebrity. If you do not recognize ends of the playing field have reDean Anderson described Hailey as her face it will be because the edi- ceived a rush like a Tau Kappa
tor had a tender heart and smeared
co-e- d
being "an aggressive and
of
at the
Asks Students to Obey the engineer. He has been an capable paraffin on it. The figure will be freshman Neighboringfirst danceand
schools
the season.
ardent
Drouth Law at U. K.and enthusiastic alumnus of the Uni the same. It was taken out in the carpenters have answered "Daddy"
versity since his graduation, and has country last summer by the Kat Boles' cry for help along tho bleachTennessee Game
whilo the maiden er lines and 5,000 of these seats also
toKen much interest In the athletic photographer
Dean j made merry in dancing with the have been sold, with the possibility .
year of the progress of the Institution,
In the sixty-fourcpuyrs. u mere is anyone that late arrivals and general
Kcuiie
University's history and the one Anderson stated.
When Dean Anderson Invited Mr. who cannot guess her identity, the mission tickets will push the total
hundred fiftieth in the life of the
Hailey to come to the University to Kampus Kat will supply the infor- attendance to well above the 18,000
Republic, Thursday, November
speak at an assembly at some tunc mation at The Kernel office in the mark.
28, 1929, is declared to be a day
'
(Continued on Page Twelve)
during the year, Mr. Hailey express- basement of McVey hall.
of thanksgiving.
ed a desire that the date be set as
As members of the University
near as possible to Thanksgiving, in
we are thankful for health, for
opportunities to work, study and order that he might attend the Ten
nessee-Kentucgome while here.
play. We are glad we are citizens
Dean Anderson gladly assented to
of this great Republic and reside
in Kentucky. It is enough to the proposal, and Mr. Hailey will
accompany his daughter to the game
make us celebrate the day with
grateful hearts and to carry In tomorrow.
our minds the hope and expectaMr. Hailey is a member of Tau
tion of a fine victory over TenBeta Pi, honorary engineering fraternity, and a member of Alpha Tau
nessee on Thursday,
Omega, social fraternity.
All attendants at the Tcnnesee-Kentuck- y
game are asked to obey
the prohibition law. It is de'
George Carey, captain of the team 'see the W&te
' .w"1
f
sirable that at a great game like
or
a member of tho Lexington
MroC"lS,clvc? fc
tho one on Thanksgiving good
the
of Carey-Ree- d,
Uy",
contractors,
sportsmanship and good behavior
e
Tho annual Stroller dance will bo thinks that the team which ho.lnuton.
should bo tho order of the day.
held from 9 to 12 o'clock Saturday captained could have won over quite
The University has asked the fedJames Park, '14, commonwealth's
night hi tho Men's Gymnasium. u lew oi me teams or recent years; attorney,
eral prohibition department to
was captain of a squad of
will be furnished by tho
but would probably find tho one of
send a large force of agents to Music
forty
a ten piece orchestra. this year superior. In '94 the team thirty or averagemembers, who wero
on tho
see that the law is obeyed. This
about thirty-fiv- o
week the 'Kernel stated that was coached by Finnie, of Minne- pounds lighter
the department has agreed to do Last dance
than the present
would be formal, and it sota, who held the position for about team.
and persons violating the law will this
At that tlmo ,
wishes to correct this statement, two or three mouths, the place of staff
bo arrested by prohibition agents.
consisted of the head boach
it WILL NOT BE FORMAL. The coach being only a part-tim- e
Job.
(Signed) FRANK L. McVEV
and one
Tho
organization urges every one to be
There were fifteen men on thn was very assistant. wnn equipment
President of the University.
Door, ami
so that the dance con squad of 94, not one had seen a from
there on time
that of tWaV
be started at the time stated.
game until they entered college. For
(wwtwuuoi on fag Twelve)

TO CAPER

Only one day is allowed this
yeaj; (or the Thaiiksglvlrig holiday. The holiday wiU begin after the eighth hour classes today
and will close at the beginning of
the first hour classes Friday.
Students missing their last recitation before the holiday and
their first recitation after the
holiday, will be penalized by having one-tenof their final
standing deduced.

Phi Mu Alpha, honorary

by the

WORK CONTINUES

711"

riH

A

TCJT1C'

JVxl LUdllJ,

TITRlf

K. PAPER

t,,'

fthmf

ENGINEERS WILL
HOLD ASSEMBLY

Proclaims
Thanksgiving Day

ad,

Former Football Captains Will
View Turkey Day Gridiron Tilt

Annual Strollers'
Dance Is Planned

Sn

Sv
'

irv

-

.iir:
1 EaSE

* Best Cop
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE TWO

I OU
a

1

Ej

Floods and 'Quakes
gold room of the Lafayette

THANKSGIVING
Tlinnks that the fruits of
Sun nnd wind nnd rain
Arc ours today but not
To hoard, to shhrc.
H. C. Baker.
CALENDAR

''

4 o'clock.

because you love nice things"

y
k

Every Inch

1

All Silk
I STOCKINGS
by Van

f

Raalte

From toctip to tip'top, the finest of
fine silk makes Van Raalte ingrain

stockings triumphs of lustrous
beauty They're every inch a
lady s choice., aristocratic in line and

lineage. They'll make you proud,
even ooastfui, of your legs and ankles.
r

In all the lovely new colors
for Fall and Winter
1.50 to $5.00

MITCHELL, BAKER & SMITH
(Incorporated)
"The Quality Department Store"

,

Baker

Aided by Massacres

hotel.

ThanksRlvlnc Day.
The Alumni Homecoming informal dance In the Men's gymnasium
from 9 until 12.
The Homecoming Oamc, Kentucky
vs. University of Tennessee on Stoll
field at 2:30 o'clock.
President and Mrs. Frank L. Mc-Vat home to the visitors, nlumni,
students, and faculty of the University.
The various sororities entertaining with open house after the Homecoming game.
Saturday, November 30
Phi Sigma Kappa house dance.
i
Delta Zcta tea dance at Patterson
hall.
i
Stroller formal dance.
I
Sunday, December 1
Vesper Services in Memorial hall

Wednesday, November 27
Huge Pep meeting at the Men's
gymnasium at 7 o'clock.
"Sorority Night" on the radio.
Wednesday evening at 6:30 o'clock
Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineering
fraternity of the University of Kentucky will entertain with a dinner in the colonial room of the Lafayette hotel.
Wednesday at 0:30 o'clock the
Kappa Sigma fraternity .University
of Kentucky will entertain in the at

f

Y ll Keep Kansu Desolate
as

1

& Smith

WASHINGTON Delayed reports
of the massacre of 200,000 Chinese
by Moslems hold no surprise for
those familiar with the problems
threatening Knnsu Province, China.
Of the 14,000,000 adherents of Islam
in China, about 2,000,000 live in
Kansu. Two distinct colonics of
provthem share the big seml-arl- d
ince on the edge of the Gobi Desert and make up a third of Its population.
One Mohammedan colony came
cast out of Turkestan at an early
but unknown date, says the National
Geographic Society. The second
moved Into the loess hills of Kansu
about 600 years ago. The tiny Moslem thorns In China's ribs have
grown into an Irritating wedge. So
strong arc the colonies that they
challenged the Chinese government
about 1070 in a bloody rebellion that
nearly severed Chinese Turkestan
from the empire. But ruthlessness
was met with ruthlessness and the
Moslem remnant escaping the
ssacre
resumed the old states.
In Separate Quarters
Their position has been that of a
suppressed race. Moslems in Kansu
have been compelled to live In separate quarters. Denied even the
safety of the city walls, the Moslems
built their own suburbs outside. Ex
pulsion proved to be their salvation
during the succession of wars and
raids which, since 1912, have laid
waste the Buddhist Chinese quartern within the barricades.
Chaos
even gave the Moslems brief control of the provincial government.
In appearance, Moslem Chinese
are little or no different from other
Chinese.
Their habit of taking
Chinese wives has diluted pioneer
blood until the distinguishing hazel
eyes and reddish hajr of the desert
ancestors are rarely seen. The Moslems have adopted the Chinese
language, although they cling to the
Arabic Koran for religious and moral guidance. They have adapted
their mosques to Chinese styles of
architecture.
Their normal loyalty
to the Chinese government prompted the republican leaders to honor
them with the fifth stripe in the
new flag. Yet they have clung to
their Islamic faith, which makes
them look uon Buddhists as "unclean."
Travelers in Kansu recognize the
Chinese Moslems by the white wool
seml-fe- z
caps that they usually
wearr Travelers also have reported
the signs of approaching conflict,
and for at least seven years? have
predicted the present massacre.
The massacre heaps new sorrows

aaaw

aaaaaaaaV

SVaam

No matter where you are,

liwMli

your clothes are of vital importance,
at the dance
on the street, sports, at
church or some, outstanding"
social function the clothes
you wear come in for a lot
of comment.

LaaaaaV

aaaaaaaam

It isn't always necessary to
have NEW clothes, either.

Against Insect Pests
in West

TONOPAH",
Nev.
The humble
horned toad, whose chief claim to
fame has been its indifference to
physical environment, is overcoming
his stupid philosophy. From now
on he is going to catch earwigs.
The earwig Is not manufactured
ogtlswr.
wetaol shdr cmfw cmf
it grows. It looks like a cockroach. In some parts of Europe It
Is a serious crop pest. In America
it Is mostly a household pest.
However, many earwigs have gone
West and in keeping with the spirit
of the open spaces have taken to
outdoor existence. They have mo
lested vegetable and flower gardens
and even some fruits. Near Seattle, Wash., they are described as a
menace.
Now the earwig has to reckon
with the horned toad. One of the
little creatures, a pet, escaped Into
the streets of Seattle recently and
displayed a voracious appetite for
earwigs. That inspired an idea, and
more horned toads were brought to
Seattle. All ate earwigs. Since then
desert dwellers of southern Nevada
have been flooded with orders for
the lizard-lik- e
toads.

t

i
If you will form the habit of having US take over the entire care of your
clothes, your wardrobe will at all times be presentable. No spots, stains,
body odor, or unsightly appearing wearing apparel.
Try it for a while.

Dresses
Cleaned and
Pressed
$1.50 Up

K

S

BECKER

Phones
Ashland

212 South Lime

621
1550

C leaners That Satisfy

U

By "Unknown" Watches

Choose

Don't invest your money in watches of unknown
makes. Buy an Elgin, and it will rarely be out of
service, for Elgin jewelers are everywhere ready
to repair the watch quickly and at reasonable cost
and other fall social events are bringing
the fashionables to Cinderella for exclusive
footwear for which this shop is famous.

Our watches and prices will give a happy ending
to your Christmas Gift Problem. Come in now
and choose from our complete stock.

to

'350

STYLES

JUST ARRIVED!
The Latest Addition to the Large Elgin Line

WATCH

And Um Our Dignified Deferred Payment Plan

IHack
Hlue

Making Your Purchase

nnniiiiiiiy

..aaaSaaPa

m

SEE OUR WINDOW DISPLAY

The Collegiate Shoe Department

Mitchell, Baker & Smith

Slipper Shop

(Incorporated)

102 W. MAIN

.

Elgin Strap

BUY NOW FOR CHRISTMAS

Hi own

jA

M5.00

This Store is an Authorized Retailer of Products Manufactured
by Elgin National Watch Co.

Other Smart Collegiate Footwear
$4.85 and $5.85

'

ELGIN

selecting a watch for yourself or as a
Gift, you naturally want a make that is known
lo have given unequalled service for years and is
backed by the famous Elgin Guarantee.

NEW

It.

R

E

DON'T BE FOOLED

THE

...

L

L

VVHEN

Thanksgiving
Festivals

Tan
Suedes
.... ....Suede
Kids
Ileptilian Leathers
Fancy Satin ....

m

Humble Horned Reptile Used

Teacher:
"Who was Kiner of
France during the Revolution?"
Confused Student:
"Louis the
Tea at Maxwell Place
Thirteenth no, the Fifteenth no,
President and Mrs. Frank L. Mc- - tne rourteentn no, the well, anyVey will entertain with a Homecom
way, he was in his teens."
ing Tea, Thursday afternoon followA llama from ancient Tibet
ing the Thanksgiving game.
Hung out with a Chinese coquette,
The Alma Magna Mater boys and
Who in a manner quite droll
girls will assist the alumni In enTook him for his roll
tertaining and Mr. and Mrs. G.
And he hasn't recovered as yet.
Davis Buckner will preside at the
tea table.
ON THE CORNER
All the visitors, alumni, students,
Have you heard of the Scotchman,
and faculty of the University will who boueht an auto beenus his
be welcomed.
wife has gas on her stomach.

ESPECIALLY ATTRACTIVE
FOR

Kids
Dull Kids

Play Afx
Impor