xt7z08637v6j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z08637v6j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670301  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  1, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  1, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7z08637v6j section xt7z08637v6j Inside Today's Kernel
Reviewer pans display of portraits in
the Student Center Gallery: Page Two.

IS. IE IRM iE IL
of

Vol. 58, No. 108

Kentucky
University
LEXINGTON, KY., WEDNESDAY, MARCH

1, 1907

television courses should
begin by the spring of 1968: Page
Three.

Eight Pages

Editorial endorses the efforts of a
united peace committee: Page Four.

Arthur Hoppe tells the tale
t Sir
Ronald and the Wicked Viiord:
Poge

Five.

The SEC swim meet could be the

bat

ever: Page Six.
The movie version of "Ulysses" is running into trouble with tfrc censors:
Poge Seven.

AWS Again Postpones

'

qM

(

s

Its Honrs Experiment;
H ead Residents Cited
Does met protection harm the
coed? Pope Five.

By HELEN McCLOY
Kernel Staff Writer
Associated Women Students

Three Win Speech Contest
Winners in the annual Patterson Literary Society speech contest
Tuesday night were John Konz, first; Hank Davis, second, and
Peter Kuetzing, third. The speech and debating society is named

after the University's first president.

President Presents
His Education Plan
By MAX FRANKEL

New York Times Newt Service

WASHINGTON President Johnson asked Congress Tuesday
to create a Corporation for Public Television that could channel
public and private funds into noncommercial television and radio
facilities and programs
unteers and that the pay of the
The corporation would func
volunteers not exceed the pay
tion like a private foundation,
of present teachers.
free of government control, but
A $15 million program to
under the supervision of 15 public board members. The Presihelp states and local governdent requested $9 million for ments develop comprehensive edits first year of operation but ucation plans.
put off for a year recommendaA $30 million program to untions on its long-terfinancing derwrite new experiments in voand other controversial aspects. cational
training and career
The proposal was the major counseling.
new element of a special mesThe creation of three resage to Congress on education
gional centers, at a cost of $7.5
and health. In reviewing the
million, to help parents and
rapidly expanding federal proteachers educate handicapped
grams in the two fields, Mr. children.
Johnson placed heavy emphaA major study of the value
sis on the need for
and potential of instructional
and research and on protelevision and research into the
moting local efforts and conuse of computers in education.
trols.
In the field of education, his
More money to help school
districts face the problems of
principal requests were the following:
desegregation, to combat adult
A major expansion of the
illiteracy and to aid internaTeacher Corps, which assigns tional educational programs and
volunteers to classrooms in city the National Foundation of Arts
and rural slum areas, with new and Humanities. Also, greater
guarantees that the states apflexibility for programs to train
prove the program, that local
teachers, school administrators
school districts control the vol
Continued on Pace 3

Tuesday again postponed action
on an experimental hours plan
after a committee reported it
could not determine the sentiment of head residents on the
proposal.
The postponement, the second
this spring, came after Senators
Beth Brandenburg and Winnie Jo
Perry reported that they could
not get "a definite commitment
(from head residents) on who approved and who did not approve"
the plans.
The two had been named as
the committee to formulate an
hours experiment to be put into
effect in March in three dormitories and sororities.
In response to sentiment expressed by the head residents,
Sen. Jonell Tobin volunteered to
get opinion on the experimental
plans from the house councils
of Complexes 7 and 8 in their
meetings Tuesday evening. Tentative dates for the hours innovations were set for March
14 but considerable discussion favored delaying the experiment until next November.
Miss Brandenburg said Dean
of Women Doris Seward (who
officially became dean of student
affairs planning today) was in
favor of "going ahead as soon as
possible" with the program.
Miss Brandenburg said Dean
Seward also suggested other possibilities: voluntary
t
with
hour for accountability each day;
late hours for a freshman hall;

gave approval of the present 10:30
p.m. closing. This was more than
the number of women desiring
any other single closing hour
32 desired an 11 p.m. curfew,
53 asked for midnight, for examplebut 161 freshmen in all
asked for hours to be extended
past 10:30 p.m. on weekdays.
to Sen.
Vicki
According
Knight, whose committee compiled the statistics from the survey, no questionnaires from
Holmes Hall where all 299 residents are freshmen were tallied
in the results, except on the issue
of a no hours system. The Holmes
Hall forms were not returned

would function as do all women's
units during final exams, with
the dorm being locked at 10:30
but women being able to stay
out until midnight. Under Plan
B, the hall would not be locked
until midnight, meaning both
men and women could come and
go up to that hour as they pleased.
Flan C would abolish "pink
slips" women must fill out and
have signed by a member of the
residents staff before leaving on
an overnight trip.
White slips requiring staff
signatures for
trips
not extending overnight recently
were eliminated by AWS. Womuntil January, when the Senate en
leavingtown now indicate that
began evaluation of the ques- only on the regular sign out
tionnaires, and had not been sheets.
tallied as requested of each unit,
A major complaint the senshe said.
ators have had with plans A
Dean Seward had indicated it and B or with
any hours changes
would be interesting to know how
suggested by the November poll
freshmen "use the time" they
Continued On Page 8
would have with a late hours
system. Miss Brandenburg said
the head residents, however,
would "rather not let freshmen
experiment." Because the women's poll indicated a 1 opposition to no hours system, the Senate has not considered it.
--

6--

ril

sign-ou-

sophomore-junior-seni-

or

hours;

freshman hours for all with a 2.3
at midterm; a key board with the
door locked at dusk; no hours,
and no sign out.
AWS had decided not to consider a freshman dorm in the
plans, as "freshman women
voiced satisfaction with their
hours" in AWS's November poll.
Asked to indicate the weekday closing hour most desirable
for their own class, 75 freshmen

Jane Tiernan, AWS House
representative to the Senate, said
"many of the women I've talked
to are really upset over how much
time it's taking AWS to get
around to doing anything on its
evaluation."
AWS Vice President Johnnie
Cross said "that's what happens
when people expect things to
night." President Connie
Mullins added, "we didn't promise any action."
The survey results were said
to be a guideline for AWS and
the Administration in considering hours changes.
hap-penov- er

A week ago, AWS gave init-

ial approval to plans, originally
aimed at Blazer and Keeneland
Halls and Complex 7, to change
the weekday curfew from 10:30
p.m. to midnight and to abolish "pink slips" used for overnight permission. Last week,
Misses Brandenburg and Perry
submitted "Plans A, B, and C."
Under A, the chosen dorm

Four Coeds See Breathitt On Citizen's Day
By JO WARREN

people visited
Gov. Edward T. Breathitt during his second
State Citizen's Day Tuesday.
Among the' 90 were four UK coeds living
in Cooperstown.
The students had two main questions
they wanted to know about the possibility
of closing the University on election day
and if out of state tuition is going to be
raised next year.
The governor said he was in favor of
closing the University for election day but
he added that interest and demand for it
needs to be stirred up by students, otherwise
it looks as it schools are trying to be "thrown
into politics."
To the tuition question, Gov. Breathitt
said he had heard nothing about it being
raised. Tuition for state colleges and univer
FRANKFORT-Abo- ut

90

sities is established bv the Council on Public
Higher Education in Frankfort.
Concerning University President John
Oswald, the governor said he thinks Dr.
Oswald is one of the outstanding presidents
of land grant colleges in the U.S. Cov.
Breathitt said he was impressed by the
president's willingness to assume leadership
in area outside the University community
and what is needed is a strong bipartican
group of citizens to support him (Dr. Oswald.)
The governor said it is not necessary to
call a special legislative session to consider
the law requiring all states to go on daylight
savings time, unless a statedetermines other-

wise.

Cov. Breathitt said the Kentucky Congressional delegation has introduced two
bills to Congress to delay the time for the
state to comply with the law.
He added that he has been looking into

out-of-to-

what administrative measures can be taken
to "cure" the emergency situation in the
event the bills do not pass.
In response to a question about lowering
the drinking age, the governor said the legislature does not want to change the age
limit. He pointed out that there is strong
public sentiment directed against a change.
He said it is not just a question of personal
freedom, but problems, such as increased
problems of enforcement, would be created
by a change in the age limit.
The topics the governor discussed during
the day included a road for a nual community, OEO programs, a woman who
wanted her job changed so she spends
more time with her family (the job was
changed), and a group ot elementary children who came to talk about the

Death Takes
UK Trustee,
W. F. Foster

William Forrest Foster, since
of the Board of
Trustees, died Tuesday morning
at Mercy Hospital, Baltimore. He
1956 a member

was 72.
More recently, he was also
a member of the University's

Development Council.
Mr. Foster was president of
the Merit Clothing Company of.
Mayfield. He was appointed in
1956 by then Covemor A. B.
Chandler to serve on the state
Agricultural and Industrial Development Board. Mr. Foster was
the United States' delegate to a.
conference in Geneva, Switzerland in 1958 on ways to prevent
surprise attacks.
He had been a patient at
Mercy Hospital since July 1966.
Het wice had undergone abdominal surgery this year.
Long a political leader in
Western Kentucky, Mr. Foster
had been a close friend of Alben
Continued on
J1

W.

Pate

3

$

F. FOSTER

At A June, 1960 Meeting

* 2 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

1,

I97

A rt: The Old Post Cover

By FRANK DROWNING

Kernel Associate Editor
There is a seiious error in
the descriptive lxoklet about the
works of Joseph Petro now on

exhibit at the Student Center
Gallery.
He is called an artist.
There are many terms of
compliment which may be attached to Mr. Petro and his produce: competent, skillful, highly

technical, pietorially honest. Dut
not a creator of art.
More than anything else, Mr.
Petro is a skilled technician. According to the accompanying brochure he has done "precise anatomical drawing for medical textbooks." That is the impression
the observer has of nearly all
his paintings that they were
either on last year's calendar or
in a public school textbook.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIII1IIIIIIIBBIIIIIIIIIB

Battle
the
Bands

r

For the most part, Mr. Petro's
works are a portrait gallery of
wom"cuty" kids, middle-age- d
en, and horses. To each he has

added the touch of the old Saturday Evening Post cover, with
the precise illustration of "the
old America we loved so well."
Indeed "The Butcher Shop"
might well have come from The
Post, with the old meat cutter
hacking away on a slab of beef,
the faithful neighborhood cocker
looking on as Fords and Chevies
whiz past the fruit stand out front.
His subject matter can certainly be justified in terms of
artistic representation of the
"little man's" life.- But Mr. Petro
offers us nothing that Eastman
Kodak couldn't have done better.
The picture is superficial, and
is in fact too "realistic" to convince us of any naturalism.
Furthermore he tells the observer nothing of the man's
character, which is essential for
-

M
M

The Twqjiuies
and

the artist if he is to be anything
more than a camera.
Take another of the major
portraits: Lexington's Mrs. Fred
13. Wachs.
Mr. Petro has not
even begun to tell us anything
about the woman, Mrs. Wachs,
with this medium. Bather he has
posed her in perhaps what is
the most trite and bromidic
pleasantly, with a
bowl of roses before her on the
table of the old
Southern veranda.
Of the one painting which
position-

-smiling

HEATERS

ELECTRIC

mmam

Starrs 7:30; Adm. $1.

might have held promise, "Pensive Nude," we are again let
down. Mr. Petro has given her
a favorite Eighteenth Century
pose, reclining upon her couch
with even a wrinkled sheet. Un-

1st Outdoor Showing!
COLUMBIA PICTURES

rWw

An IRVING ALLEN Product

DEAI1

Alltl-MART-

II1

fortunately, when the illustrator
did approach artistry, he forgot
the skills he did know, and produced a figure which must either
have been a contortion artist or
deformed. Where an anatomical

MARGRET
as

d

glass-toppe-

MATT HELM

a
n

featuring

JOSEPH PETRO'S EXIIIUIT AT STUDENT CENTER

3rd
i Week!

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IRRESISTIBLEl"-- Lf

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ncwis

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CAMILLA

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SPM

AUPMCESl

Production

MELVIN FRANK

"AFUNNYTHING
HAPPENED
ONTHEWAYTO
THE FORUM"

DQSDEQBEcf"

Pif,

FOR MATURE

1SUGCESTED

A

with

JAMES GREGORY
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audie MURPHY
1

suGGfsrioro

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COLUMBIA

PICTURE

and WVLK's
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Bulletin Board
The public is invited to the
presentation of the films
"The Flight of Gemini II", "Saturn Ciant Step to the Moon", and
"Highlights of 1965" Thursday
7 p.m., in Anderson Hall Room
259. Coffee and donuts will be
AIAA

mm

3rd FUN WEEK!

H

H
H

3 DAYS ONLY

mMK nmMro

The Theological Forum schedfor Thursday has been

uled

WBBBffl

MARCH

NOW SHOWING!

14,15,16

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exclusive
FIRST RUN!

::::::::

!

Print by
TECHNICOLOR

Rlsd thru
UNITED

"Powerful Emotional Impact!"

ARTISTS

-- LIFE VfA..

Julie

The Kentucky Kernel
The

Oskar ;
Christie Werner Q

Wf)

;

Fahrenheit

M
M

n
u
u
M
u
n

An informal coffee hour and
get together will be held for
women students between 9 a.m.
and 12 noon March 2 and 3 in
Room 206 of the Student Center.

BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN

H
H
U

M
M

Theta Sigma Phi will hold a
reception for women journalism
students eligible for membership
Thursday in the Maggie Room of
the Journalism Building at 7 p.m.

I
i

Jt

mil

M
M

Ticket sales at the Complex and Donovan "
8 Hall Cafeterias Thursday and Friday.
S

r-

r

U
U

Admission $1.00 advance

4i

Oov?HSTi"KP(ooiirTiofi

M
M

STUDENT CENTER

COLOR by Dalui
UNITED ARTISTS

!"AU!!J

M

8:30 - 12:30 p.m.

Doubtless the best guide to
understanding Mr. Petro is his
employment background:
Illustrator for Family Weekly
magazine, calendar artist for
Brown and Bigelow, Eli Lilly
Pharmaceutical Co., medical and
scientific illustrator for major
medical publications, a commissioned collection of 32 horse
paintings for the Keeneland Racing Association, etc.
The exhibit opened Tuesday
and runs until Mar. 10. Hours
are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday
through Friday; 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. Sunday.

The Student Party for Equal
Representation will meet at 8:30
p.m. Thursday in Room 245 in
the Student Center.

PLUS

SATURDAY, MARCH 4

can do.

served.

The Mg-- 7

JIM JORDAN

trutWulness miht have been a
strong aid, he lost it.
Of the horse paintings well,
1
suppose there s not a lot one

451"

TECHNICOLOR

tIV;
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From the world- famed novel bv

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ji
nay urauuury

rrancois iruiiaui

qrjr
Feoturei

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his internationally acclaimed most unusual motion picture

Kentucky Kernel, Unlverlty
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 49U8.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann Nickell, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1919.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
13.00
Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from flies
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors. Sport .... 2320
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News Desk
Advertising, Business,
2311
Circulation

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday. M;nh

I.

l!M.7-

-:

Johnson Offers Education Plans

Continued From Tagc 1
and aides, and other educational
workers.

President Johnson made a special appeal for early action by
Congress on major educational
measures to permit schools and
colleges to start planning for
each academic year.
In the field of health, the

President's

principal

requests

were the following:
A $20 million program for
research into the quality and
availability of health care, concentrating on personnel shortages and other barriers to the
efficient distribution of services.
Extension and expansion of
the Partnership for Health Law,
which is designed to abolish
many specific federal grant programs and permits much more
flexible allocations of funds to
be spent on health programs designed by local governments to
meet local needs.

ference on medical costs.
The costs of physician ;crviccs
rose eight percent last year and
the costs of hospital services 16
percent double the average rate
of increase of the previous five
years and the trend is expected
to continue, officials said. The
rapid rise is attributed to the
growing demand for the services
of physicians and to the new

complexities and wage structures
in hospitals.
Mr. Johnson's entrance into
the widening debate over noncommercial television was intended to provide a focus for discussion on a controversial subject.
The Carnegie Commission on
Educational Television proposed

last month that a public corporation be financed through the imposition of a federal tax on new
television sets. Previously, the
Ford Foundation had urged that
noncommercial television be supported with contributions from
commercial networks and others
e
commuengaged in

THE PHYSICAL PLflllT
CODD

PHD THE

WILLING

LORD

THIS ROOM WILL BE FURNISHED

long-distanc-

nications.

FOR USE

Both groups endorsed the use
of space satellite channels to

connect noncommercial stations,
an idea that President Johnson
said the new public corporation
should study at once.
The President did not, however, commit himself to the creation of a public network. He
suggested that the new corporation be allowed to establish and
support several production centers and local stations directly,
as favored by the Carnegie study.

90

BY

STUDENTS

SOMETIME DURING

THE

SPRING SEMESTER
A

Hard Time

Good ol' PPD (the Physical Plant Division to the uninformed)
really gets a hard time and its slowness in getting buildings fixed
and people moved is legend. Attest this sign in the King Library.

TV Courses
Foster, Trustee, Dies pianned By Spring Semester '68

F.

W.

search, for a National Center
for the Deaf and Blind and for
occupational safety programs.
The President also directed
John W. Gardner, the Secretary
of Health, Education, and Welfare, to convene a national con-

Continued From Page 1
Barkley, whose unexpired term
he was asked to fill in 1964.
Last year, Mr. Foster managed

the unsuccessful senatorial campaign of John Y. Brown in
Brown's bid to unseat U.S. Sen.
John Sherman Cooper.
In 1915, Mr. Foster went to
work at the Merit Clothing Plant
in Mayfield at $5 a week. Within a short time, he was secretary
to the general manager and in
1942, Mr. Foster was elected
President of the Mayfield firm.
Mr. Foster was one of the

the United States to
receive Horatio Alger awards in
New York City. The award is
given to those men in business
who have gone "from rags to
riches" like the fictional hero.
12 men in

Mr. Foster was born in a Graves
County log cabin.
His early education came at
the old Galloway School in
Graves County. He took the third
grade three times because "there
wasn't anything higher there."
Mr. Foster attended high school
for a short time but quit to
begin work for the Merit Company'
At Frankfort, Gov. Edward
Breathitt said "Kentucky gained
much from the life and service
of Willy Foster, and we shall miss
him. 1 offer my sympathy to his
wife and son."
Mr. Foster is survived by his
wife, Mrs. Kitty Foster, and a
son, Charles Foster. Burial arrangements are incomplete but
Mr. Foster's body was returned
to Mayfield late Tuesday.

IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE KERNEL!

University-Produce- d

Next spring semester will see
something new University-producetelecourses for the first
d

time.
UK plans to have television
studios and full facilities with
student crews for closed-circu- it
TV by the spring semester 1968.
The plans formulated so far have
been held up by Kentucky Authority for Educational Televis-tion'- s

rejection of the building
plans. Hopefully, a compromise
can be reached.

as is feasible Mc-Ve-y,
Engineering, Commerce, Law, and
Dickey Hall will be connected
for closed-circu- it
TV. Stuart Hal-locdirector of TV Services,
says that television will be taught
only in courses that lend themselves to TV or 'in courses of
large enrollment where time utilAs

soon

Chemistry-Physic-

s,

k,

allow the best professor to reach
a larger segment of the university, he said.
The ideal telecourse will be
20 minutes in length followed by
the individual professor's 30 minute explanation, elaboration, or
discussion.
Dr. Robert Murphy, head of
the School of Communications,
says that telecourses will produce increasing quality despite
increased student enrollment and
cost of education. Telecourses,
Dr. Murphy says, are definitely
not a means of
or decreased staff, but rather a
resourse for staff and student that
will increase efficiency and quality education at UK.
Michael Rumano, coordinator
of Medical Center TV and spe

assistant to the executive
for educational
TV, is optimistic about educational TV in general and UK's
place in the growing field.
Dr. Rumano says that TV is
more than another teaching tool
and becomes an academic resource. In highly specialized
cial

vice-preside-

areas it will make complete
courses available from the main
campus for those unable to return
to the campus but w ho must keep
up with the changes in their
profession, he said.

Attention Students
OVEN

MICROWAVE

5c

TAKES 20 SECONDS
TO HEAT HOT DOGS

CONVERSATION

AND FRENCH FRIES

COFFEE

ization and
rapport if hard to attain.
Telecourses are to be tools to
student-profess-

FREE

CLASSIFIED ADS
Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113, Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.
FOR SALE
SALE
Electric motors, used,
'a Sc Va horsepower, $5.00 each. Bulk
all makes. Call Dennis,
discount;
22F19t
after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE 1900 Porsche Super 90
radio, radial
roadster;
ply tiers, competition roll bar. Car
needs new valves andor rings, $650.
John Frelinger. 219 N. Broadway,
28F2t
apt. 1. Phone
FOR SALE 1959 Rambler American.
Good tires and battery. Phone

FOR

Daily

Baptist
Student Center

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED
WANTED Bus drivers. Must have
valid Ky. driver's license. Must be
over 21, have mornings or afternoons free. Apply Wallace's Book
7Ftf
Store.
STORE
BOOK
needs
your used textbooks. Bring them in
We pay top prices. We buy
anytime.
9Ftf
all used textbooks.
Good looking, liberal
WANTED
minded female companion for Florida trip during spring break. All
expenses paid. Travel via Vette.
28F4t
Call Jeff

VISIT THE NEW, DIFFERENT

Wildcat Grill
(Next to Coliseum)

371 S. Limestone

WILL

ANYONE
with information
about the denting of a blue
parked in Euclid lot Feb. 24
contact Sue Kingston, ext. 2210. lMlt

Olds-mobi- le

8:00 a.m.

-

FAST SERVICE

10:30 p.m.

NO LINES

WALLACE'S

TAYLORS
PRICES

269-99-

1.

0.

28F3t

FOR SALE

Austin-Heal- y

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED Student's wife
Good typist, some shorthand; 5 day
Must have own
week,
23F5t
transportation.
e
HELP WANTED
Students
work. Call
leave name and
phone number and you will be contacted.
lM3t
8:30-4:3- 0.

7.

part-tim-

7,

19591006

runs good.
hardtop; radio, heater; Call Lieland
Body needs some work
lM3t
after 5:30 p.m.

278-45-

FOUND
Yellow

FOUND

ring with
Dispensary,

LOST
Yellow gold, ladies' Benrus
27F3t
watch. Reward. Call
Lee County High
LOST Class ring.
School. Initials S.R.R. Call
lM3t

gold high school
on it. A&B Liquor
lMlt

SEE Charms of Europe

and Middle
East. Free. Student Center, Room
111. now through Friday 3, 11 a.m.-- 7

1.

RIDERS

1.

PERSONAL

LOST

WANTED

1964

lMlt

p.m.

from Venezuela!
JUST ARRIVED
Student with
flavor
needs date for dance March 4th.
Are you a nice, attractive female?
Then call Alejandro after 10 p.m.,
ext. 3622.
lMlt
Latin-Americ-

Elgin AFB or
Northern Florida. Leaving March 9
or 10. Return March 19. Call
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after 4 p.m.
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to

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WEDNESDAY SPECIAL

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Kwtuiky fried
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SUITS
DRESSES

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OPEN

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* The Kentucky Kernel
The South' Outstanding College Daily
Uniyi hsity of Kentucky

K3TA13LLSHFD

WEDNESDAY, MARCH

1894

1, 1967

Editorials represent the ojnnions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walter

M.

Grant,

Editor-in-Chi-

William Knatp,

Sikvk. H(k:co, Editorial Page Editor

Business Manager

Important Drops

University students and faculty
and Lexington citizenry who united
Sunday to protest U.S. involvement in Vietnam are to be commended for their concern over the
Johnson Administration's immoral
policies.
This group has already begun
an impressive program. Calling
themselves The Citizens for Peace
in Vietnam, they have provided
a "Vietnam Peace Research Center" in the Presbyterian Center
on Rose Street. Books, articles,
government documents and a film
catalogue on national foreign policy and the general subject of peace
in Vietnam will be available for all
interested persons.
In addition, the organization
will conduct, each Sunday, a peace
vigil in front of the Administration
Building or at some other central
place on campus, according to
Mrs. Lawrence X. Tarpey, who
will chair the vigils.
war-makin-

g

We extend a word of caution
to this group, however. As it is
composed of both students and
it is very important
that no outbursts of violence occur
during the peace vigils and ruin
the chances for success of a most
noble undertaking. Violence on
campuses of American universities
have taken
in which
an active part has left a bitter
taste in the mouths of many after
the numerous Berkeley incidents.
The members of this new group
should be lauded for their sense
of honor and justice in hoping
non-student-

s,

non-studen-

for

ts

the immediate withdrawal of

U.S. troops from a country in
which they do not belong. Their
actions may be but a drop in
the bucket, but similar actions
across the nation may soon fill
the bucket until it overflows on
Lyndon Johnson's desk, which becomes more and more absorbent
as election year draws near.

"Say, We Could Get Lost In This Thing"

Letters To The Editor

Vallebona' s Soapbox Distorts Facts About Germany
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Having read the Feb. 23 University Soapbox of Mr. Rafael
"Germany: Are the Nazis
I was amused and shocked
Back?"
by the lack of knowledge, inexVal-lebon-

a,

influential positions have cooperated in one way or another with
the Nazi regime. Even more so,
most people in Germany did. Other-

wise, they would not be living any
more, since the Nazis did not parcusable misinterpretations and gen- ticularly care for those who would
eral distortion of facts. This space not cooperate. It should be common
is too limited to even sketch a resense to see that such cooperation
has nothing to do with being an
but in pointing out some
ply,
misconceptions I should indoctrinated Nazi.
E. It is ridiculous, and would
mention that:
A. The plot of 1953 was combe amusing if it were not so sad,
pletely insignificant, since it lacked to assert that Germans of today
any support of population or in- think of themselves as a supreme
fluential agencies. It is even un- race. I simply suggest that Mr.
known to me, and to most of the Vallebona go to Germany and look
Germans. I imagine that always, for this supreme feeling. In this
somewhere extremists are planning manner he could also learn someto overthrow the existing condi- thing about Germany.
F. It only adds as a detail,
tions, even in American and South
America.
to clarify that by no means is the
B. It is significant for the author National Democratic
Party the
to limit his article to quotes from third lartest party. It has about
Die Welt, The Christian Monitor five percent of the votes. And, it
and Der Spiegel, none of which is not even Nazistic, but simply
reflect the intentions of the popumore national than other parties.
but all of which belong to
The potential of my argument
lations,
a limited extreme movement and is by no means exhausted. I wish
cannot be considered objective. I I could have the opportunity to
doubt that this is the proper way report objectively about Germany
to report on another country.
in a more detailed treatment. And,
C. Mr. Vallebona's claims are I wish that anybody who expresses
supported by biased information. his opinion in international affairs
would have a more profound and
So, in the mentioning of the comeback of former Nazis into the Ger- intellectual background than Mr.
man Government he unfortunately Vallebona has shown.
Bernd Brewes
forgot to mention that all of these
UK Graduate Student
persons were dismissed and many
in Mathematics
put on trial as soon as their past
from Berlin
became known (by the way, Hans
Globke was never Secretary of
State). It should not be on the
Do Tlit? ( reeks dart'?
level of the Kernel to permit seemI have been waiting a long
ingly ignorant authors to identify
such as Strauss and Kies-ing- time for some Greeks to spring
persons
as Nazis.
to the defense of their societies
D. Of course, many people in through your Letters to the Editor.
dis-astero- us

er

It's my opinion that they have
been the target of more shots of
poor journalism than most campus
newspapers have darts. But I've
yet to see any rebuttals.
Do the Greeks in fact have
nothing to say in their defense?
Or are their letters not printed?
Or do the students no longer care
what the Kernel says?
Terry Dunham
Journalism Sophomore
Editor's Note: It is the policy
of the Kernel to publish all Letters
to the Editor which are in good
taste and are not libelous.

bus returns). I guess you've heard
a lot about fraternities?
Rushee: Yes, but I wasn't sure
my parents would let me pledge,
until I showed them my 3.5 average.
Active: (I guess you have a better
personality than I first thought).
Let me show you our party room.
Rushee: Speaking of grades,
what's the house's average?
Active: I'm not exactly sure
(I only know that it's well below
2.0. Maybe you could join up and
keep us off social pro.) Here's the
party room. We have record parties
here every week after rush is over
(if you can call two couples and
k
of beer a party) and a
a
big bash at least once a month.
Will you come to the party Saturday?
Rushee: I'd like to, but I don't
know any girls.
Active: Don't worry. I know
a sorority girl that would love to
go out with you this weekend