xt7z348gfx3p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z348gfx3p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19300110  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 10, 1930 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 10, 1930 1930 2012 true xt7z348gfx3p section xt7z348gfx3p Best Copy Available

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

CONVOCATION
Will be held Tuesday in
Memorial Hall

UNIVERSITY
LEXINGTON,

VOLUME XX

OF

KENTUCKY,

KENTUCKY
JANUARY

NET GAMES
'Cats play Crelghton Tonight
and Saturday

NUMBER 15

10, 1930

'CATS FACE BLUEJAYS TONIGHT
U. K. Requests
WOULD USE SUM
FOR STRUCTURES

AND EQUIPMENT

Cecil B. DeMille Names
Catherine Lowry 'Most

Beautiful

Doctor McVey's Report Shows
School Needs for Next
Twelve Months

PRESIDENT EXPLAINS
USE OF SUMS ASKED
No Request Made for. General
Administration, Mainten-

ance Expenses

$479,500 Appropriation From Budget Committee CREIGHTON TEAM
IS HERALDED AS

ENGINEERS

WILL

ILLINOIS
OIL REFINERY
VISIT

Appropriations
totalling
$479,500 for new structures Senior and Faculty Members
and $75,000 for equipment of
Will Inspect Methods
buildings now under conEmployed at Plant
struction are requested in the
University's report to the UNIVERSITY GRADUATE
1930 state budget committee, MAKES ARRANGEMENTS
according to an announcement by Dr. Frank L. McVey, Eight Officials on Staff of
Mechanical College Will
president.
Make Trip
Buildings for 'which appropria-

are request d are $200,-00- 0
laboratory for the College of
Engineering, a $150,000 laboratory
building for the biology and zoology department,
a $75,000 agricultural mechanics and engineering
building and- a $25,000 service building for campus shops and equipment.
Besides these buildings, all at the
University proper, the request includes appropriations for two buildings at the Kentucky Experiment
Station, and $10,000 for storage and
office structures at the Princeton
substation.
The request for experiment station funds calls for
$15,000 for beef and cattle barn and
yards and $4,500 for hog barns and
yards.
'
Of the. $75,000 requested, for
construc
equipping buUcUngs-unde- r
tion, $30,000 is allotted to the new
education building, $30,000 to the
new library and $15,000' to the new
products building.
are requested
No appropriations
and
for general administration
maintenance expenses as funds for
unithis purpose come from the
versity's share of the state and inheritance taxes and from tuition
and 'other receipts. The University's
annual income from taxes is approximately $1,025,000, a portion
which is set by law.
In making public the appropriation requests to the budget committee, Dr. McVey pointed out that the
(Continued on Page Two)
tions

THIEF ENTERS
RANDALL

HOME

Police
Arrest
Cincinnati
Robert Poster, Negro, in
Pawn Shop; Is Returned to
Lexington Jail
Sunday night the home of Dr.
Frank H. Randall, professor in the
College of Law, was
University
burglarized by Robert Poster, negro,
of Cincinnati, Ohio, who took
eleven dollars in cash and a large
quantity of clothing. Poster was
arrested in a Cincinnati pawn shop
after trying to pawn some of the
stolen property.
Monday morning when Dr. Randall awoke he found that two suits
of clothes, one of which he had
never worn, several pairs of trousers, an overcoat, some of his chilin
dren's clothes, eleven dollars
cash, and a large traveling bag
were missing from the house. Upon
investigating
he found a front
window open, and other evidence
of the intruder's burglary. Poster
entered downstairs, and wont
through the entire house searching
for valuables.
In the downstairs rooms he found
an overcoat belonging to Dr. Randall, but failed to take Mrs.
fur coat, which was
Randall's
hanging nearby.
He then went uptstairs to Dr.
Randall's room where he obtained
the cash and additional clothing.
The door to Mrs. Randall's room
was locked.
plain
Monday a Cincinnati
clothes man, making his dally visit
to the pawn shops noticed and suspected a negro who was in the act
of pawning a suit of clothes. Upon
investigation it developed that the
of a
clothes bore the trade-mar- k
Lexington store. The Lexington
police were notified and furnished
with a description which tallied
with that given them by Dr. Randall. Poster was held and Dr.
Randall went to Cincinnati yesterday, and identified the recovered
clothing.
and
Poster waived extradition
was brought to Lexington Wednesday. The maxlmium penalty for
burglarizing at night in Kentucky
is a life sentence.

Sixty-seve- n
seniors and members
of the faculty of the College of
Engineering of the University will
be the guests of the Indian Refining Company at Lawrenceville, III,
today and Saturday. The engineers
will leave early this morning and
will return to Lexington Sunday.
The purpose of the trip is to enable the students to inspect the
company and to make a study of
the most modern developments in
oil refining. The arrangements for
the trip were made by Col. James
H. Graham, president of the refining company and a graduate of
the University with the Class of

1900.

Faculty members who will make
the trip are Dean Anderson, Prof.
W. E. Freeman.. Prof.. L. S.. O'Ban-ho- n,
Prof. D. V. Terrell, Prof. W.
B.
M. Beebe, Prof. P C. Emarth,
Dicker, and Gordon Thurman.
The Saturday program Is as follows:
a. m. Breakfast at the
7:30
Indian Refining company cafeteria
Wigwam building.
in the
by Col.
8:30 a. m. Remarks
James H. Graham, president Indian
Refining company.
8:45 a. m. Lecture, "Fundamentals of Petroleum Refining," by B.
Indian
H. Auglin,
Refining company.
9:20 a. m. Outline of refinery
tour. H, K. Hashbarger, supt. of
construction.
9:30 a. m. Trip through refinery
in groups of five, each under guidance of members of the engineering staff.
1:00 p. m. Luncheon served in
Wigwam cafeteria.
2:30 p. m. Lecture, "Production
of Crude Oil," by George R. Bryant,
engineering department.
p. m. Lecture,
3:15
"Modern
Methods of Balanced Petroleum
Refining," by J. E. Lockhart, engineering department.
4:00 p. m. Lecutre, "Disposition
of Refinery Products," by H. C.
Grimsley, sales department.
4:30 p. m. Question hour (During this period various members of
the operating staff will be available
to answer questions in regard to
specific refinery operations).
6:30 p. m. Dinner, Wigwam club.
7:30 p. m. Entertainment.

Debate Team Will
Return From Trip
Prof. W. R. Sutherland and five
members of the University debating
team will return to Lexington Monday from a tour of the South,
which they started December 31.
When they return the members
of the squad will have participated
in twenty debates with Emory and
Henry College, Rollins College, and
the University of Florida.
The entire group on the tour includes: Sutherland, University debate ccoah, William Pearce, Clifford Amyx, Sydney Schell, Hugh
Russell Jackson, and Richard Malcolm Weaver.

Co-E- d

U. K.'

Sisters Think Beauty Winner Should Have Been
an Alpha Gamma
Reports have it that Miss
Lowry was more surprised than
pleased when she was Informed
thaC she had been named the
"Most Beautiful Girl on the
University of Kentucky Campus." She didn't want to go to
the dance given in her honor at
the University gymnasium, nor
did she act in a manner thought
to be in common with members
of her sorority. O met O my!
What to do I There have been
whispers that she has been
showing the wrong attitude.
But in reality she IS the queen
of the campus and of the Alpha
Gamma Delta house.

ARE

AT

ANNOUNCED

T

DANCE

Pictures of Other 36 Girls
Will Appear in Special
Section of Annual
CONTEST IS DIRECTED
BY O'REAR K. BARNES

Newspapers Plan to Feature
Photographs of Winning
Contestants

Miss Catherine Bennett Lowry,
of Corbin, was named winner of
the 1930 Beauty Contest held under
the auspices of the Kentuckian
when O. K. Barnes, director of the
beauty section of the year book,
announced
the verdict of the
CHICAGO
Judges at the "K" dance last
Saturday night. .
Cecil B. DeMille, internationally
famous moving picture director,
was the final Judge in the contest.
Story Turner, Former U. of He selected Miss Lowry's photoK. Student, Will Sing for graph as the one which most exemplified the beauty for which
Sunday Vesper Service Kentucky is famous. Mr. DeMille
Audience
was faced with a stupendous problem In the selection of the winner;
will be held at 4 he had to pick from forty-foconVesper Services
o'clock Sunday afternoon January testants, all of whom were capable
12,
in Memorial Hall., Story of upholding, the traditions
of.
Turner, tenor, or Chicago', assisted
by Miss Edith' Love at the organ
Along with the announcement of
and Mrs. Foster Krake at the piano, Miss Lowry's selection, Mr. Barnes
will furnish the .musical program. also gave the names of the seven
Mr. Turner is an alumnus of the other girls who will complete the
University and during his student Beauty Section of the 1930 Kendays was outstanding in musical tuckian. Pictures of the remaining
co-ewill be placed In
circles. During the past three thirty-si- x
years he has been studying in Chi- the Favorite Section.
cago.
eight who will compose the
of the music
The members
The
committee advise and urge every- Beauty Section are: Catherine
Lowry, Corbin, Alpha Gamma Delone to attend.
Following is the program
for ta; Virginia Wardrup, Middlesboro,
Sunday:
Kappa Delta; Jewell Martin,
Organ Toccata, from the Fifth
Delta Delta Delta; Leura
Wldor Pettigrew, El Paso, Texas, Alpha Xi
Organ Symphony
Miss Edith Love Organist
Delta; Margaret Ann Wyant, LexChrist Church Cathedral
ington, Delta Zeta; Margaret Douglas, Buechal, Delta Delta Delta;
Tenor aria If With All Your
Adams,
Hearts Elijah .... Mendelssohn Lois
Smithland,
Chi
Story Turner
Omega; and Felicia Ann Sanders,
Organ Prelude In G Minor. .Bach Paduch, Chi Omega.
Eurydlce a Fantasia .... Csaf f in
Miss Lowry is a Junior in the
(Continued on Page Six)
Tenor solos:
Aylward
is Morn
Beloved It
My Soul Is Athlrst For God
Gaul
The Holy City
Organ Cortege Funebre . . . Dubois
Tenor solos:
The Nightengale Has A Lyre"
McKlnley
of Gold
Bird Songs at Eventide.... Coates
Just For Today
(A Prayer)
Seaver
Victor F. Calverton, distinguished
Dlx sociological and literary critic, will
The Trumpeter
Mrs. Foster Krake at the piano
be the speaker at the general ConOrgan Hallelujah Chorus
vocation Tuesday morning, January
(Messiah)
Handel 14, at 10 o'clock in Memorial Hall
according to a statement
issued
Monday by President McVey.
Society
a;
consistant
Mr. Calverton is
To
contributor to the Survey-Graphi- c,
Current History, Saturday Review
of Literature, Journal
of Social
ic
Forces, The Nation, The New
The 139th regular meeting of the
and many other publications.
Lexington section of the American He has lectured in England, GerChemical Society will be held in many, France, and for universities,
Kastle Hall, at 4 p. m., January 14, Clubs,
forums, and educational
according to an announcement organizations of all types In the
made this week by O. J. Stewart, United States. He Is author of
secretary-treasurer.
Dr. Francis F. "The Bankruptcy
of Marriage,"
Heyroth, of the Basic Science Re- "The Newer Spirit," "Sex Expressearch Laboratory, University of sions in Literature," two volumes
Cincinnati, will speak on "Recent of literary criticism, and "Four
Investigations of Certain Proteins Strange Lovers." He is also editor
by the Aid of the Ultracentrifuge."
of "Sex In Civilization," "RepreDr. Heyroth, as a Fellow In sentative American Negro LiteraMedicine of the National Research ture," and "The Modern QuarterCouncil, spent a year In the labora- ly."
His subject will be "The New
tory of Professor Theodor Svedberg, American Literature," and his apof Spsala, Sweden.
pearance will be under the auspices
of the English Club. Professor E.
F. Farquhar, professor of literature,
Is in charge of the program.
Mr. Calverton Is an Intellectual
pioneer, an authoritative
and
scholarly exponent
of modern
thought. He makes every appearhours of tho dawn. With one eye ance on the patform not only one
closed and the other open Just far of interest, but one of notable
enough to avoid bumping into the forcefulness and thought provokbed-poyou grab the first garing enlargement of the mental
ment which comes within your horizons.
sleepy grasp and crawl Into it. That
8 o'clock has to be met, prepared
JUNIOR CLASS TO MEET
te
or not, and much frantic
Joe B. Allen, president of the
cramming is gone through
with. And remember, dear student, Junior class, has announced a meetIt's not Just one Waterloo you must ing of the Juniors Tuesday afterface, but many every day unto tho noon, at 3:30 o'clock in the lecture
room of McVey Hall, and requests
end.
More power to them I And our that all class members attend. A
will
be
only wish is that we may sit next secretary and treasurer
to them, in examinations
that chosen and important business will
be discussed.
count I

TENOR

TO APPEAR HERE

Literary Critic
To Be Speaker

At Convocation

Chemical

Hear Scientist
Tuesday Afternoon

Shall Overtake Lowly Students

RADIO ADDRESS

Beauty Winner
Catherine Bennett Lowry
Named Most Beautiful
Girl on Campus

STRONG QUINTET
Big Blue Net Men are Read
for First Tilt of Two
Games Series

LAWRENCE M'GINNIS
MAY START BATTLE

University, State and Na
tional News is Summarized

Invading Marauders Present

By Doctor McVey

Imposing Record in
Middle-We-

What Alpha Gam! EIGHT WINNERS

Two Weeks Remain Till Death
In the interval between the Joys
of Christmas holidays and the
of
final examinations
sorrows
comes a lull which is difficult to
describe in mere words. All had a
happy vacation.
Two weeks from today, (yes, Just
two short weeks from now) the
professors will begin their semi-annuunanbarrage of well-nig- h
swerable questions, which they,
nevertheless, expect us poor, helpless students to answer.
A Big Ben, guaranteed to awake
even Hehry Clay, blasts out its insistent summons in the wee small

at

PRESIDENT M'VEY
REVIEWS YEAR IN

SCHOOL PROGRESS IS
CALLED OUTSTANDING

By VERNON

Kentuckian Heads
Science Association
Dr. Thomas Hunt Morgan, one
of the most distinguished graduates
of the University and director of
the Kerchkhoff Laboratories of
Biological Sciences at the California Institution
of Technology,
Pasedena, Cal., has been named
president of the American Associaof
tion for the Advancement
Science.
Before accepting his present position at California, Dr. Morgan was
a professor of zoology at Columbia
University. He is recognized as an
authority on heredity and has done
much research work In that field.

When Cecil B. DeMille and
O'Rear K. Barnes put their heads
together in conference, pleasing results come to light. Such was the
case during the selection of the
Beauty Contest
1930 Kentuckian
The result was all that could be expected. Miss Catherine Lowry, of
Corbin, Ky., was selected as the
most beautiful girl on the University campus. Miss Lowry is a
member of the Alpha Gamma
Delta sorority and a Junior in the
College of Arts and Sciences.

U. K. TEACHERS
ATTEND MEETS
Faculty Members Represent
Kentucky at Educational
Associations Throughout
Country During Holidays
Many members of the University
faculty attended educational meetings throughout the country during December. Dr. W. D. Funk-housDr. W. S. Webb, Dr. M. N.
States, Dr. Otto Kopplus, W. A.
Price, Dr. W. D. Valleau, Prof. A.
J. Olney, and H. H. Jewett represented Kentucky at the session of
the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, held in
Des Moines, Iowa.
Among the meetings In Washington, D. C, were those of the
American Farm Economics association, and the American sociological
association, attended by Dr. W. D.
Nichols, Prof. H. B. Price, Prof. J.
W. Martin, W. L. Rouse, R. E.
Proctor, D. G. Card, and W. G.
Finn, of the University; and the
American Economics association at
which Prof. John J. Troxell, Prof.
Edgar Palmer and Colvln Rouse
were present.
Prof. A. C. Zembrod, Prof. Margaret Horsfield. Prof. H. B. Holmes,
Prof. L. L. Dantzler, and Prof.
George K. Brady went to Cleveland, Ohio, to meet with the Modern Languages association; Prof.
Victor Portmann attended the program held by the American Association of Teachers of Journalism,
In New Orleans:
The Society of
American Bacteriologists at Ames,
Iowa, was attended by Dr. Morris
Scherago and Dr. R. H. Weaver;
and Miss Ann Callihan visited the
arts expositions in New York.

Professor Roberts
Takes Kiwanis Post
Professor Roberts, of the College
was formally Installed as president of the Lexington Kiwanis Club at the weekly
luncheon meeting held at the LaProfessor
fayette hotel Tuesday.
Roberts outlined the purposes of
the club and the policies he would
maintain during hhls administration. Dr. Wellington Patrick, also
of the University, Is secretary of
the club.
of Agriculture,

Referring to Genealogy, Progress
Runs Amuck Among Cognomens
Boasting of the progress made by
the University in the past few
years, officials have neglected to
consider that in the cognomens of
their constituent population there
is a tendency to retrogression that
might prove hard to explain.
Surveying the surnames of the
residents of this Institution, it has
found that as In olden times, the
great family of Smitlis lead in
forty-forepresentation
with
members of their clan present. The
descendants of the ancestral John
Smith outclass all other tribes.
Wilsons and Browns have fought
to a draw with the result that each

D. ROOKS

Kentucky Wildcats
stir uneasily in their lair on
avenue. The shrill
Euclid
cry of the marauding Blue-ja- y
from out of the northwest that has been trrifying
the midwest of late with its
threats of basketball supremacy dating back over a period
thoughts of war into the Blue
of eight years, has brought
Grass.
The

Buildings, Record Attendance
And Athletic Success
Praised By President
Declaring that the past year was
the "record year" of the University,
President Frank L. McVey in an
address "The Year 19229" delivered
Tuesday over the University remote
control radio station, summarized
the outstanding events of the past
twelve months. The complete text
of Dr. McVey's speech follows:
"The year 1929 has come and gone
and the task I have on this day is
to call attention to some of the
things that have happened in that
time. I am under the necessity of
saying that it is not possible to
cover even fairly adequately the
events of the year but the attention
of the radio audience may be directed to the outstanding incidents
during the past three hundred and
sixty-fiv- e
days.
"During the year Mussolini for
Italy and the secretary to the Pope
for the Vatican, signed the Lateral
Treaty that ended 60 years of controversy and made the Vatican a
world state.
"On March 4 we inaugurated a
president of these United States.
The inaugural address presented
some very Interesting statements. It
called attention to the Kellogg
Peace Pact, the necessity of this
country entering the World Court,
andj the requirement
upon' the
Nation' as a whole to accept the
Pact as a future principle of its
statemanship. Later on in the year
he discussed the status of food
ships In war time and neutrality
on the high seas. In order to make
these matters of real value in the
coming London Conference, Honorable Ramsay MacDonald, the
Premier of Great Britain, visited
the United States and conferred
with Mr. Hoover. The world looks
with great hope to the London Disarmament Conference In January.
"In the 15 years that the United
States has been in control of Haiti,
the American Marines have been
stationed there for the purpose of
maintaining order. Recently trouble
has broken out in the island necessitating the sending of an additional 500 men to that troubled Republic.
And, still more recently the
United States Secretary of State
sent a note to the Soviet Republic
calling attention to the Kellogg
Peace Pact and the necessity of
maintaining peaceful relations with
the Chinese. The Russian government resented the note but the outcome was an agreement by the
Soviet Republic with the Chinese
over the management of the Man-churlrailway.
"Dr. Eckner brought the dirigible
ship, Graf Zeppelin, to the United
States twice during the year. Airplane activities increased considerably and new commercial routes
have been established. The
on Page Two)

st

Tonight at 8 o'clock the basket
ball team of Crelghton University,
hailing from Omaha, Nebraska, and
boasting of a long string of luminaries, will test its hardiness against
the stubborness of McBrayer and
company. And come what may, the
Bluejays will return Saturday night
to the Men's gymnasium for a sec
ond dose of whatever Dr. Johnny
Mauer has prescribed.
Hopes of the Wildcats for victory
are bolstered by the announcement
that Lawrence "Big" McGlnnis is
slated to return to his position as
running mate of Captain McBrayer
at the guard post. Coach Mauer
thinks the Wildcats can rise to
great heights with this combination clicking again of course, be
doesn't say so in public. The.
tendon that has been playing
pranks on McGlnnis' ankle is coming around into shape and unless
another quick turn puts him on
the bench again, Lawrence will
start the Crelghton argument If
McGlnnis is out, Jake Bronston,
who has proved himself capable at
the guard position, will take up
the fight.
"Pisgah" Combs, the Lexington
youth with tripping toes, will pair
up with Carey Spicer, another Lexington product at the forwards in
the opening game. "Spooks" Mil-wa- rd
will be up against it. Facing
him in the center circle will be
none other than little Brud Jensen, who stretches six feet and
seven inches skyward without moving a muscle. Crelghton fans say
he often pushes the ball Into the
basket without jumping.
If the Catholics get hot in the
Kentucky game as they have in
their other starts, Captain McBrayer and his running mate will
have their hands full.
The Crelghton gentlemen started
(Continued on Page Five)

FRESHMEN HAVE
GOOD PROSPECTS
Coach M. E. Potter Has
Squad of 25 From Which
To Produce Winning Team;
Play Seven More Games
With a promising squad of 25,
including a bevy of high school
luminaries, Coach M. E. Potter
hopes to mould a freshman basketball team this year that will take
the state championship.
With two games tucked away in
the record bag, the Big Green team
faces a schedule of seven games
with the prospect of more being
added as the season progresses.
McCaw, Jackson, Congleton, Darby, Riffe, and Sterns
have been
showing up well at forward. Sale,
Skinner, and Mulligan are outstanding for the pivot position, and
Worthlngton, Johnson, Cave, Kreu-te- r,
and Napier are making strong
bids for the guard positions.
Darby, who received a broken
ankle In the Tennessee freshman
football game at Knoxvillee, did not
report for practice until after tho
Christmas holidays, but he will see
action in a majority of the games.
The squad at preseift Includes:
J. R. Collins, W. E. Congleton. W.
H. Cave, M. Jackson, C. A. McCaw,
S. Napier, K. R. Riffe. R. R. Rudolph, S. M. Smith. F. Sale. Q.
Walker, L. B. Fishback, Worthlngton, T. Helm, D. R. Mulligan,
George Skinner, R. Clark, E. Johnson, D. Kreuter, E. F. Seale, Bill
Luther, B. R. Aldridge, M. Foster,
W. C. Hines, and D. Darby.
The remainder of the schedule
Is ns fpllows:
January 17 Georgetown, here.
January 23
Eastern Normal,
here.
January 30 Georgetown, there.
February 8 Louisville, there.
February 12 Kentucky Wesleyan,
there.
17 Lexington
February
High,

appelatlon has twenty-on- e
defenders on the campus. The proverbial
Jones, not to be left far behind In
the mad scramble, have enrolled
twenty loyal contenders; and the
Thompsons rank fifth with eighteen.
Among the also rans, who have
more than ten representatives are
the noble families of Young, Allen,
Davis, Harris, Howard, WiUUtmsl
Johnson, Lewis, Martin, Moore,
Rogers, and Scott.
The University also has a school
of individualists ranging from the ncre- Ausenbaugh's tlirough Kazanjlan,
February
to the Zwlck's.
there.

19

Eastern

Normal

* PRESIDENT M'VEY

Society
Cadet Hop
The third endet hop of the social
season, sponsored by the University
R. O. T. C. wns given Saturday
afternoon In the Men's gymnasium
from 3 to 6 o'clock. The Masque- orchestra played for the
dancing.
,
The chnperoncs Included the
members of the military depart- mcnt nnd their wives: M.ijor and!
Mrs. Owen R. Meredith, Captain
Herbert W. Schmid, Captain and
Mrs. Clyde Grady, Lieut, nnd Mrs.
P. E. LcStourgcon, and Lieut, nnd
Mrs. Jnmcs E. Rccs.
About 200 guests were present.
FRATERNITY ROW

The wedding of Miss Helen Stone
nnd Mr, Chnrlcs Blnnchard,
Jr., was solemnized nt the First
Methodist church, at Sarasota, Fla.,
Christmas afternoon. The ccre-radc- rs
mony wns performed by the rtev.
H. A. Spencer, pastor of the First
Methodist church, assisted by Dr.
S. W. Walker, of Tampa,
Mrs. Blanchard is the daughter
of Prof, nnd Mrs. A. J. O. Wells, of
this city. She is n grndunte or tnc
University nnd n member of the
Beta Sigma Omlcron sorority. At
present she is teaching history In
tho John Gorrlc Junior High school
of Jacksonville.
Mr. Blanchard is the eldest son
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blanchard,
Sr., of Daytona Beach. He Is a1
graduate of Indiana University.
Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard left
immediately after the ceremony for
Tampa, where they will start for a
cruise of the Bahamas. They will
make their home in Jacksonville.
Wells

Misses Lucy Wntts, Louisville;
and
Helen Hnrt, Georgetown;
Misses Sallle, Betsey, nnd Helen
Owens, Madison, Wis.; were visitors
at the Dcltn, Delta Delta house
last week-enMisses Dorothy Ford, Hamilton
College; and Helen Maxcy, Mays-vlll- e;
Roberts-Fischwill spend this week-en- d
at
the Alpha Gamma Delta house.
Miss Leila Peyton, who is teach was the tedding of Mis Wdl;
lng at Helllcr, spent the week-en- d
nt the Beta Sigma Omlcron house.
Major Wigglesworth and Hubert
Buckles attended the national convention of Sigma Nu fraternity nt
the Edgewnter Beach hotel in Chicago, December 28, 29, and 30.
Delta sorority, the Mortar
wnnii. Phi Beta Kappa, Theta Slg
ma Phi, Pi Mu Epsilon and was
W. W.
president of the University Y. W.
C. A. during her Junior year. At
the present time she is working for
an advanced degree in mathema192 W. Short, Lexington
tics.
Bring 'em today get 'em tomorrow
Mr. Fischer attended Transylvania College and the University
of Kentucky where he was a student in the College of Commerce.
After a trip to the South the
couple will be at home in the
&
Algonquin apartments.
204-- 7
Guaranty Bank Building
Caldwell-Callaha- n
Phone 3616
The marriage of Miss Marguerite
Caldwell to Mr. Clyde H. Callahan,
of Lexington, has been announced
parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Mrs. Stephens and Miss by the bride's
Clement C. Caldwell. The marriage
Lucy Watts, of Louisville took place Saturday, December 21,
with the Reverend Mark Collis ofand New York, are beginning their second term in ficiating.
Mr. Callahan is a
ballet, tap and ballroom University and holds student at the
a position at
dancing at the College of the Combs Lumber Company.
Music on January 7.
The couple will make their home
in Lexington.

For further information

call Ashland 7005.

The University of Kentucky has
been named by the Carnegie
Foundation of New York to receive
a grant of $1,800 for the summer
session, according to Information
The grant
received late Monday.
to the University was among others
made to several other schools in
the United States.

1CHLER,
FLORIST, Inc
417 E. Maxwell St.
Phone Ashland 1419

"Leave your order with
Carrie Bean, our
agent, at the Book-Stor- e
or
Post Office."
Miss

R. W. SMOCK

has it that ye
the fellowship of

pipes with seasoned, masculine, mellow men of every age and degree.
Some try to join this brotherhood, yet fail, and are absolved as
born to pipeless lives. But honest
effort is required each man's own
test with good tobacco in a good pipe.
That is the formula. Both pipe
and tobacco must be good. The
pipe must be pure of bowl, and the
tobacco must be
Well, Edgeworth, if you'll permit
good old Edgeworth, Class of '04.
Tried Edgeworth yet? Now's your
chance! Use the magic coupon, and
we'll rush right back to you a
packet of genuine Edge-wort- h
to fill your good pipe with.

Watch Your Watch

Careful Watch and
Clock Repairing
Work Called For and Delivered

niONE

157 S.

0'

aily (arm

LIME

Two and Six Day Limit Tickets to all points on the

Southern Railway within a radius of 150 miles of

Lex-

ington on sale daily at greatly reduced fares.

Towu and State.
How let tho Edteworth

come

V

HAIRCUTS

;

;ALSO BOBBING

fiATTmTTinxT
."Mill II IMIIV

II

A

7"

I

cixronmmr
fulfil IMVI

SHOP
Phone Ashland 2259

arnmtromKmnmntmnmnmttmmmmmmmtmmmmmimmmmm:

The Woodland Barber Shop

"

202 Vt Woodland Avenue
MR. G. S. STRAIN, Prop.

MR. Roy GRIMES, Mgr.

With the dances and other social events of this month
coming on, you will want to look your best we will
do .ill in our power to help you keep in trim
"GIVE US A TRIAL"

mmmmtmtm:ttttttimttt:tttmmmmmtt:tttm:

We Cut It to Please You

1

University Shoe Shop
OUR WORK AND PRICES ALWAYS
KEEP US BUSY
Cor High and Lime

M. A. Mangionc & Co.

IIIIIIIHIICIIIIIIMIIIIIIINIIIIIIICIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIICIIIIIIIIIIIICllllinillllCIIMCU

j The Viaduct Barber Shop
I
1

MR. A. E. WARREN, Proprietor

1

177 East High Street

jj

1

j

SKULLER'S
Lexington's
Leading Jewelers

,

Hie Student Barber Shop
Corner Maxwell and Lime

jj

PHONE 344

127 W. MAIN ST.

Authorized Retailer for Elgin
National Watch Company Products

PAUL,

SPECHT

gets yon off
on the right
foot!
THERE'S

WHY NOT
A

KAPPA SIG, DELTA CHI or PHI TAU
HOUSE DANCE

Keller Floral Co.
"At the Sign of the Rose"

no better way to start this year in your pleasant pursuit
than to get your clutches ou Paul Spechl's newest

Columbia record. Tho melody maestro makes perfectly grand dance
music out of these two talkio hits.
The other pair of records listed hero arc excellent, too hear them
when you bear "I'm Following You 1" And if you want a big surprise,
hear them all ou tho $50 Columbia Portable!
Speak to your dealer about this he'll be glad to oblige you!
i,
Kccord No. 2050-D- ,
75c
.
I'M Followinc You! (from Motion Picture
ox I rots
"It's a Great Life")
l'all Specht and
I'M Sailing on a Sunueam ! (from Motion Pic (
His Orchestra
ture "It's u Creat Life")
j
i,
Kecord No. 2057.D,
75c

It

SlTTIN' ON A DOOKSTL'I'

You Came. I Saw, You

Mi:

X'nwn campus,,.
"
cd

f

IJoys

Itecord No. 2051M), lOWnct, 75c
MOLLY (froiuMotioiil,ieturo"ThoCrand Parade") "i l'OC(,s
That Wondkhful Something (Is Love) (from f fiinri,.H
Motion Picture "Untamed")

City Ticket Agent 2

n fatt iVVt a
IV

East High Street

j;

For the

Traveling Pass. Agent.
J

THE CLOTHES
175

ji

CITY TICKET OFFICE

W. It. CLINKENBEAKD,

YOUR CLOTHES SHOULD HE CLEANED AND
PRESSED IJEFORE THE HOUSE DANCES
LET US DO IT FOR YOU

"Gifts That LasV'

SHOULDER CORSAGE

5
5 II. I). LYONS,

---

up for the
Let us "Primp"
You are assured
Events of the
of the best of service and workmanship

See Ticket Agents For Particulars

112 East Main Street, Phone, Ashland 49

BE PRESENTABLE

SMOKER PLANNED
Sigma Delta Chi will hold a
you
Social
smoker Thursday night, January
17, in Dicker Hall, at 7:30 o'clock.
week-en- d
All men students in Journalism are
Invited to attend.
have happened during the year and 1
my time now having reached the
conclusion, I take opportunity of
wishing all a happy and prosperous fEaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiitcaiiiiiiiiiiitcaiiiiiiiiitiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiitiiicaiiiiiitiiiiicaiiiuiiiiiinP
new year, and that we, as a people,
may work together during the year
with understanding and appreciation on the problems of our State,
Kentucky.

SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM

Nunc.
Street.

(Continued from Pago One)
University includes six different
great colleges with many activities,
a great experiment station, an agricultural extension department with
throughout
the
representatives
at
state, experiment
Quicksand and Princeton, and a
business serbureau of school and
vice. Because of its size and varied
activities, comparison of the University and its expenditures with a
single institution is inappropriate,
he said.
President McVcy further explained that a statement recently released at Frankfort to the effect
that expenses of the state educational institutions In 1929 exceeded
five million dollars Is misleading
since the University and other state
Institutions merely act as trustees
for large sums of state money
which are expended in agricultural
extension, experiment station and
public work not actually a part of
their educational activities. Tho
University alone acts as trustees for
this
of
$700,000
approximately
money, he said.
He showed that while $5,496,178
went through the treasu