xt7z348ggb1n https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z348ggb1n/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580228  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 28, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 28, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7z348ggb1n section xt7z348ggb1n Rehabilitation Center
Director Is Defended

fsoy
ti

i

o

Unfair Lighi casl On Dr. Jokl, While? Say
Ccnlcr Will Remain Open To Students
By

f

JOHN I.GI.RTON

1lV lluf 1f F:fv
Dean M. M. White of tlie UK College of Arts and Sciences I'll IVI UV.l
TTVXI1V.'Xrtte County Medical Society's criticism of tlie University's re habilitation center had cast nrf-fair light on Dr. Ernst Jokl, director of the center.
White's comment came in response to the society's charge that UK "was engaged in the
1

corporate

The center was established in
after an agreement between
the University and the Kentucky
Rehabilitation Center. Under the
agreement, UK furnished a direc- tor (Jokl), a room In Memorial
Coliseum and certain other facili- ties, including the coliseum swim
ming pool.
In return the center agreed to
pay the University $8,000 for the

practice of medicine"
and that Jokl "was practicing
medicine without a license."
UK President Frank G. Dickey
said that a portion of the work
of the center was discontinued
Feb. 1 after a study of the sltua- lion wa made by the Adminlstra- lion. After Dickey's disclosure, this
sequence of events was brought to

1954

light:

-

director's salary and to furnish
any equipment necessary for the
center's operation.
The center was placed under the
jurisdiction of the Arts and Sciences College and its purposes
were set out as research, student
training and treatment, and treat
ment of patients (not members of
(Continued on Page 6)

Two UK Alumni
Will Be Honored
Vol. XLIX

Two UK alumni in the field of education will be honored as
part of the University's Founders Day program Sunday at 3 p.m.
in Memorial Coliseum.
They are Dr. William S. Webb, UK distinguished professor
of physics and professor of archaeology, now on special assignment and Dr. Richard Vanlloosc, superintendent of Jeffcr- -

UK To Host
TKA Speech

is a native of
County. He has been in
since 1939, firsl as prinboth elementary and
schools and as superintendent of Jefferson County
schools since 1950.
Dr. VanHoose has pioneered the
use of closed circuit television as
a tool for education in the Jefferson County schools by establishing
the first real educational TV experiment in Kentucky. He is
chairman of the Board of Trustees,
Georgetown College, and is a director of the Kentucky Education
on Page 10)
Dr.

VanHoose

Anderson
education
cipal in
secondary

X

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DR. RICHARD VANHOOSE

DR. WILLIAM WEBB

"

(Continued on Page

10)

9

King Candidates
A novel twist will be made at the next major dance on the social
calendar, the Gold Diggers Rail. Usually a queen Is selected, bat at
the Digger's Ball, which the girls escort the boys, a king will be chosen. The candidates are from left to right: Front row: Bob Bates. Odie
Gilliam, Jim Hoe. Dave Frederickson and Joe Johnson. Back row:
Herb Schraff, Bill Schneider, Sam Ewing. Jim I'rbaniak. Dick Lombard and Charlie Cheatham.

1

!).8

Hj
Number

17

Religion In Life Week
To Begin Here Monday
'

At least 60 schools throughout

the country will be represented at
the 50th anniversary conference of
Tau Kappa Alpha, national speech
honor society, to be
April

I.

i

The Rev. Thomas B. Cowan.
pastor of Union Church at Berra,
will launch the annual Religion
In Life Week Monday as speaker
at a convocation in Memorial ColU
scum.

held here

All Tnlverslty claws will be
dismissed for the 10 a.m. talk.
The subject of his talk will be
"The Golden Heresy."

10-1- 2.

nationally-know-

n,

dignitaries invited to the confer'- -'
ence is President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
The conference will open with
registration at 8 a.m. Thursday,
April 10. Attending delegates will
take part in debate, discussion, and
public speaking competition during
the meeting.
A model initiation will be held
at 5 p.m. Friday, April 11, in the
Music Lounge of the SUB. This
will be followed with a Golden An- niversary Banquet in the SUB
Ballroom.
Dr. Gifford Blyton, head of the
speech department and coach of
the debate team, is director of the
anniversary confeernce. The UK
debate team has captured one first
place award and tied for two
others in recent competition.
Tau Kappa Alpha was founded
50 years ago at Butler University,
Indiana. The University of Kentucky was selected as the site for
the golden anniversary conference
because facilities at Butter were
unable to accommodate the delegates.
The honor society Is composed
(Continued on Page

Religion In IJfe WerJc. formerly
called Religious Fmphaslit Week,
will last through Thursday. Rev.
Cowan and nine other speakers
will spend the week talking to
various classes, departmental assemblies, organisations and res.
dences.

j
I

i

Special denominational meeting

REV. THOMAS COWAN

VETERANS

CHECKS

Veterans should sign up for
checks from March 5 in room
204 of the Administration Build1--

ing.

The offiee will be open tomorrow from 8:30 to 11:50 a.m. Office hours during the week are
0
a.m. and 1:30-4:5- 0
p.m.
8:30-11:5-

10)

will be held each evening, according to tiie schedule. Each of the
speakers also will be available for
conferences. Arrangements for them can be made in
the "Y" lounge in the Student

personal

Union Building.
Coffee hours are scheduled for
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
at 10 a.m. in the SUB "music room.
All speakers will be present to
talk and met with students.
A reception in the SUB musie
room Sunday afternoon will be
open to faculty, ktudenta and ln
terested townspeople.
The convocation Monday morn
ing will feature as guest solobt,
- (Continued on Page 2)

Students Of Today And Past Generation
Are Compared In Survey Of Professors

Coed Dress
Contest Sell
For Campus
The Kernel will sponsor an entry
In the annual Glamour Magazine
"Ten Best Dressed College Girls in
America' contest. This is the first
time UK has had an entry in this
contest.
A panel of Glamour editors will
select 10 winners from the entries
and they will be notified early in
April. The winners will be photographed on their respective college
campuses and, in June, they will
be flown to New York as gupsts of
Glamour. They will participate in
Glamour's College Fashion Show
and be entertained and interviewed
by the magazine editors.
UK's entry will be chosen by
popular vote on March 28 from a
group of ten finalists to be selected
by a committee set up by the
Kernel.
Each women's residence unit on
campus is eligible to enter from

ma.

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., Friday, Feb. 28,

ionjerence
Among the

W

Um IE MIS

At Founders Day
ferson Ccunty schools. Bronze
plaques will be presented to Dr.
Webb and Dr. Vanlloose my Dr.
Herman Lee Donovan, president
emeritus of the University.
Dr. Webb, a native of Greendale,
has been associated with the University since 1901. He was promoted to full professorship in 1913
and in 1915 was made head of the
Department of Physics. In 1927
Dr. Webb was appointed head of
the Department of Anthropology
and Archaeology, thus becoming
one of the few men in the history
of the University to head two departments simultaneously.

t't

I
'

Much of the criticism leveled at
the American education system in
recent months has centered around
the college jtudent. He has been
called lazy, complacent, and even
irresponsible by educators and
arm-cha- ir
philosophers alike.
What kind of 'student' Is today's
Joe College? Are these criticisms
justified? How would he compare
with his counterpart of a generation or so ago?
Seven UK professors gave the
Poll-Csome interesting answers
to these questions this week. Here's
what they think of the current
crop of students.
Prof. R. D. Mclntyre of the Com-- I
merce College sees little change
over the past 20 years or so. "Today's student is not as provincial
as he was then, and may have
more comprehensive knowledge.
Advances in communications have
opened a wider field to him, but
comparatively speaking, he Ls
about the same In ability. The

years after World War . II produced the best students," Mclntyre
said. "The veterans were the most
serious, the most interesting and
the most challenging.".
Prof. Ben W. Black of the English Department said today's freshman English student "is better
prepared than he was eight years
ago. High schools are putting more
emphasis on writing than formerly," he said. "I think perhaps
too much time is spent on fringe

courses, but no one knows enough here. As for tertousnesa and efabout that yet to make more than fort," he continued, "there's not
a guess. Personally, I'd like to see too much difference. The veU (
more time spent on academic World War II were the best
tu-dent- s."

courses. I can wvy. definitely.,
though, that students as a whole
write better now," Black concluded.
"On the average, they're not as
high in ability." said Prof. John E.
Reeves of the Political Science Department. "Everyone Is joing to
college now, so we're getting more
students who perhaps shouldn't be

at

I

t

REEVES

SCIIERAGO

1

BIGGE

EAVES

Did he think "a comparison of
grades would reveal any differences? "No, I don't think so,"
Reeves said. "The curve system
would make a comparison invalid.
If we gave standardized tests,
though, grades might be some help
in answering this question."
Dr. Adolph E. Bigge, head of the
Modern Foreign Languages Department, thinks students of the
late '30 s were challenged to greater
efforts that many students today,
lie said the opportunities for employment were less promising then,
making competition for'Jobs much
more intense. "The financial problems of the SO'a perhaps engendered greater sincerity of purpose
than is observed today," Bigge said,
but freshmen entering UK tn 1951

(Continued on Page

10)

* J--

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friil.iv. Tel). 28. 10"8

TI1T

rclined, refinished, cuffi,
Leather jackets
waistbands, zippers.
KEYS MADE WHILE YOU WAIT

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who will
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graduate In lf).!) and who have
maintained an overall scholastic
Ktandinc of 3. should rrport to
the Dean of Women's office If
they have not ret received an
invitation to Mortar Hoard's
amarty Party.

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Repair

GIURGEVICH

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387 S. Lime at Euclid

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4

ML Week
(Continued from Taje 1)
Mrs. Rosa Page Welch, a mezzo-fopranShe has sung before adult
and youth groups throughout the
o.

--

-

X

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i

.-- -Of

vorld.

Religion In Life Week Is spon-hore- d
by the Inter-Fait- h
Council.
Rev. Cowan, a native of Scotland, wan pastor of Everybody's
Church In Iexington before going
to lierea. The other speakers are:
IUL Planners
The Rev. James W. Angcll, pastor,
Second Presbyterian Church, LexThe planning committee for Religion in Life Week is shown at a
ington; Dr. John Anton. Assistant nueting in the Y Lounge of the Student Union Building making final
Professor of Philosophy, University arrangements for the HIL program to be held on campus next week.
of Nebraska; Dr. Abraham Cron-bacProfessor Emeritus of Social
Studies, Hebrew Union College,
Cincinnati.
The Rev. Robert Estill, rector,
Christ Church, Lexington; the
Rev. Harrison McMains, Executive
Director, Christian Council of AtIncorporated
lanta. Georgia; the Rev. Elmer
Moore, English instructor at Villi
Madonna College; Dr. William L.
Reed, Professor of the Old Testament at the College of the Bible,
Lexington; and the Rev. Donald
PHONE 27
N. Anderson, pastor of Woodland
Christian Church, Lexington. Air
Force Chaplain Capt. Raymond
400 E. VINE
LEXINGTON
Pritz will be on campus for classroom talks.
h.

FAYLOR TIRE CO.

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7:30.

U. S.

REPRESENTATIVE

Wtuere there's a Mail

Dr. Douglas S. Schwartz, director of the Museum of Anthropology, will deliver a preliminary
report on the archeological research being doneat Mammoth
Cave at the Kentucky Archeological Society", meeting tonight at
Dr. Schwartz and Dr. .Frank J.
Essene, head of the Department
,of Anthropology, are classifying
and typing the Indian remains
found in the cave area. Funds for
the project were provided by the

OUR

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* THE Kr.M

GreekWeek
Concluded
By Dinner

kl-RNri-

f

..

iid.n. IVf.

I'S. l!).H

THE

(1H

DIAMONDSCOPE

r

The annual UK Greek Week
pram was concluded on Wednesday
nipht with a banquet In the SUli.
The banquet was attended bv
The principal address of the
all the fraternities and sororities.
The principle address of the
evening was given by Dr. Irvin
Lunger, president of Transylvania.
Dr. Lunger was introduced by Dr.
Frank G. Dickey, UK president.
Awards were presented to the
member of each pledge class
elected by his fraternity or sorority as its best pledge. Bill Gil-- ,
lespie, IFC president, presented the
to the fraternity pledges
. awards
and Marilyn Mayes, Panhellenic
president, gave recognition to the

Viewed through the Diamondscopc,
there COrt'be no doubt cs to whether""

your diamond is flawless or, if not,
what internal inclusions exist.

)

CARL HEINZ
Registered

Jeweling American Cent

102 W. Short St.

Society

Phone

FOR POSITIONS IN

ENGINEERING

'

torority pledges.

l ( KV

In recognition for work orf the
light bulbs for polio drive, seven
fraternities received ''awards for
perfect pledge attendance for the
'
campaign. The Alpha Tau Omei
pledges received an overall award
M4WM(foli
for the highest average collection
per pledge.
Only Fivo
Awards for the light bulb sale!
were presented by Crutcher La- - Here is one of UK's youngest coeds, who doesn't need a babysitter.
Krew, head of the Lexington Cham- - She is Joan Stadelman, a music major irom Hopkinsville. Joaiiie was
born on Feb. 29 so she's only 5 years old. Oh. well, that's the breaks.
ber of Commerce. She is president of Delta Zeta Sorority, treasurer of Tanliallenic and
was selected as outstanding sophomore woman last year.

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Constance McCray'of Lexington,
and Paul E. Thorns of
Brandenburg, baritone, will present
a Joint senior recital at 8 p.m. tonight In the Laboratory Theatre
of the Fine Arts Building.
Miss McCray will sing three
Chants D'Auvergne arranged ' by
. Canteloube;
'.'Wind's Work" by
Arthur Benjamin; "The Seal Man"
by ReUacca Clarke; and "Sally
Gardens" and "Oliver Cromwell,"
both arranged by Benjamin Brit- .,ten.
Thorns will sing two selections
from ..Brahms, "Verrath" and

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* The Kentucky Kernel

rrj

rr

University of Kentucky
Entered at the Port Office ftt Lexington. Kentucky as second diu matter tinder
the Act of March 3, 1879.
Published weekly during tchool except holiday and exama.
THREE DOLLARS A SCHOOL YZAR
-

JAMES BLAND, Editor
DAVE ALTEMUEITLE, Managing Editor
ANN SMITH. News Editor
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JOHN EOERTON, Makeup Editor
ED FORD. Sports Editor
FRANK C. STRUNK. Associate Editor
Tracy Walden, Society Editor
Andy Epperson, Makeup Assistant
Jim Hampton and Norma Shelton, Feature Editors
Bill Tully, Assistant Sports Editor
, Ray Cravens and Vernon Vinding, Cartoonists
Charlotte Bailey, Exchange Editor
NORMAN McMULLIN, Adv. Mgr.
PERRY ASHLEY. Bus. Mgr..
JOHN MITCHELL, Staff Photographer .

Academic Freedom
The publicity on the recent

case involving "academic free-

dom" has caused a number of students to pose the question,
"How about academic freedom for the students?"
Before attempting to discuss such an idea one must define
what is meant by the term.
As seen from the viewpoint of the student it means freedom
to express one's ideas in classes, to discuss various possibilities t
jor interpretation's of writings, or to form and express one's
own philosophy or concepts on innumerable subjects. These
ate some of the objectives of a liberal arts education.
It's obvious that an instructor in engineering must lecture
in order to teach a undent certain laws of mathematics, but
even he allows for some class participation. An engineer needs
to know these laws because deviation from them may mean the
failure of his project.
Such is not the case in an Arts and Sciences college. Here
a student needs only a few basic facts in each course and he
uses these to form his own opinions, theories or philosophy. ,
There are violations of this basic freedom on the campus
in the form of censorship by professors.
Some violations are intentional; others are not.
Those which aren't can be easily corrected by makiiigTlie--'
professors aware of this shortcoming. Usually they have learned
only the lecture method of teaching. By acquainting them
with the discussion technique many could be converted into
good instructors. The unintentional violator would learn to
encourage students to express their ideas. Thus a particular
student would have several choices available and could select
the best points from any number of views and use them to

build Ins viewpoint.
The intentional violators the classroom dictators are the
ones to which most students object . . . and with some justification. These individuals believe there is a definitely right
or a definitely wrong answer in any point brought up in
class. Their view is the right one and all the others are dead
wrong. They spend day after day expounding their pet
theories and expect the student to parrot them back at exam
time. Should a student be so audacious as to question the
validity of their statements, he'll pay for it but good. Either
a sharp retort, continual harassment in the form of loaded
questions or a lower grade await the "troublemaker."
In this type of environment the student isn't allowed to
express anything except that which meets the instructor's apthe "line" of the professor. And some
proval. He's spoon-feof these creatures always begin a course by luring the unsuspecting student ivith the stdtement, "feel free at any time to
disagree with me or to suggest ideas." When the student takes
d

Feel Free To Disagree
him at his word he is promptly shipped down. A very effective device.
This is not to say that the majority of instructors arc of
this type for they aren't. But there are all too many of them
who are. There's little the administration. can do about them.
The responsibility for any change lies with the offenders.
One can only hope they will grow up and begin to allow students to have free discussion.
Then, and only then, will a student be able to acquire a
real "liberal" education. Until that time, students will have
to grin and bear it or rebel and pay for it.
--

--

ones!

Those who have given themselves
the most concern about the happiness of people have made their
neighbors miserable. Anatole France

What A Mess

Kernels:

Last Monday it came to light that the Kentucky Rehabilitation Center had been ordered closed after a protest by the
Fayette County Medical Society.
In the last few days it has been learned that the entire censection which
ter isn't closed. Only one section was closed-th- at

Blessed are the forgetful; for
they get the better even of their
blunders. Nietzsche

No great intellectual thing was
ever done by great effort; a great
thing can only be done by a great
man, and he does it without effort.
John Ruskin

It is preoccupation with possession, more than anything else, that
prevents men from living freely
and nobly. Be'rtrand Russell

American life is a powerful solvent. It seems to neutralize every
intellectual element, however tough
and adien it may be, and to fuse
it in the native good will, complacency, thoughtlessness, and optimism. George Santayana

generality

of

men

are

naturally apt to be swayed by fear
rather than by reverence, and to
refrain from evil rather because of
the punishment that it brings,
than because of its own foulness.
Aristotle.

,
treated patients on a fee basis.
The medical society protested that the University was engaged in the "practice of medicine on a corporate basis." It
also charged that Dr. Ernst Jokl, director of the center, was
" practicing medicine without a license."
an M.l). degree from the University of Bres-laJokl, who-hais a member of the British Medical Association, was
plnsician'at the Olympic games twice and is currently a consultant to a committee of the American Medical Association.
The members of the board of directors of the center are
also members of the Fayette County Medical Society,' the protesting group.
Alter looking over this set of facts one can say that perhaps
the society was justified in the first charge. Technically, they
may be right in the second case.
But looking at the whole picture one can only wonder,
is going on here?"
"What in the
And it wouldn't be a badJdea for someone to try and get
the answer.

u,

--

The

Another of the many inconsistencies of the group regulating traffic on campus has come to the fore.
Recently some students who were
assigned parking space in an area
were given traffic tickets because
they parked on a yellow line.
When entering the lot they
found it to be full and so had no
place to park. Since they had paid
their parking fee they, quite naturally, expected a parking spot. But
the one they found allowed part of
their cars to sick over the yellow
line.
Result . . . one traffic ticket
costing a fine of two dollars.
The question raised was, who
controls how many cars are supposed to be parked in one lot?
Evidently too many persons were
alloted space or else someone was
parking there who shouldn't.
If someone without a permit was
parked, then he should have been
given the ticket and not the student with a legitimate permit.
If the traffic controller has allotted too many spots for the space,
let's get it straightened out.
Maybe this is only a minor Irritation for students, but it's the
small ones that bother most. If
you must tag cars, get the right

UNIVERSITY SOAPBOX

Writer Says Ideal Drug Could End Drunk Menace
only one is socially approved in our culture.
So approved, in fact, that more than 600 people were

(I'd. Xote: The opinions here

the
author and do not necessarily
reflect those of the staff. Jim
Hudson is a junior journalism
in expressed are those of

major from Frankfort.)

.

By JIM HUDSON

Two stories in state newspapers last week dramatized
an example of cultural lag in America that must be
remedied before we can ever consider ourselves ready to
enter the Rocket Age.
One of the stories, an editorial in the Louisville Courier-Journal,
concerns a woman convicted of drunken driving three times in five months. The first two times the
woman was convicted, the editorial stated, she appealed
her fine and license revocation and a jury freed her both
times. She appealed her last conviction but the jury increased her fine to $500, only to have the court judge reduce the fine to $300, with the august explanation that
"something prejudiced the jury."
' The other story was on the conviction of Miss Candy
Rait, an exotic, blond stripper with a body like Venus De
Milo, for possession of marijuana. Miss Barr was sen
fenced to 15 years in prison.
Two facts stand out in both cases: both women were
trying to transcend celXhood but of the two means used

charged with drunken driving in Kentucky during January. An estimate of 50,000 more drunken drivers who
were not caught during this same period, potential murderers rocketing over the highways of the state, is so
conservative that it is ludricrous.
These facts will come as a surprise to no one. The
gregarious drunk singing songs, spouting billingsgate,
slapping people on the back, and waking the morning
is as much a part of
after with the enevitable hang-ovAmerican culture as baseball games and hot dogs. To
the average American drinker, there is nothing whatsoever etnically or morally wrong" with Soaking up enough'
tipple to float a Volkswagen.
But when a "tea" smoker is caught, in her. own home,
bothering: no one but herself, the air is immediately filled
with shouts of "dope fiend, corrupter of youth, degenerate,
immoral," etc.
Most men and women lead lives that are so painful
and monotonous that the desire to transcend selfhood is
tne of the principal urges. People have attempted to
satisfy these urges through the use of art, religion, literature, alcohol, narcotics, and countless others. Our cultural environment is becoming increasingly complex, emphasizing our need for a satisfactory narcotic that will
both
allow this1 transcendence without the
and physical, of tobacco and alcohol.
mental
deler-iu- m
stupefier: hang-over- s,
Alcohol is a second-rat- e
are the best one can hope
tremens and
fo after an extended bout with the devil drink. Tobacco
Is a weak narcotic when smoked but when it is soaked
in water and the water is drunk, the kick is equal to
marijuana. But this too will cause a hang-ove- r.
That prohibition is not the answer to this problem wai
er

ts,

dry-heav-

es

demonstrated during the "twenties." The only practical
policy is to induce men and women to exchange their
old bad habits for new and less harmful bad habits.
Scientists must concoct a hew drug that will allow
man to transcend selfhood without producing the undesirable social consequences of alcohol and barbiturates,
one that is less poisonous than opium or cocaine and less
inimical to heart and lungs than cigarettes.
On the positive side, it must produce a change in consciousness that is' more interesting, more valuable than
mere release from inhibitions orstupefaction. It must do
this without causing the user any appreciable loss in reaction, time, muscular
and sense f respon.
sibility.
Of the known narcotics, probably the one coming closest to these requirements is mescalin. Mescalin is made
from the same cactus plant that produces the peyote
used by North and South American Indians in religious
ceremonies for communing with the gods. It is not
habit lorming, does not produce a hang-ove- r,
incite its
uers to violence or boisterousness and Indians that have
used it for as long as 40 or 50 years show no physical
-

ts.

The effects of Snescalin ar? appealing to an intellectual but the contemplative mood that it produces doesn't
appeal to the lower intelligence group. Also, some users
whose biological make-up- s
are not appropriate, experience a hellish effect rather than the ecstacy that most
users report.
Mescalin is not the answer but it does provide a basis
for more scientific research that needs to be done in this
field. Until this "ideal drug" is discovered an made
available to the average man, hang-oveand drunken
drivers will have to be tolerated.
rs

* -

THE KF.NTIT.KV KERNEL, rridav. UU. 28. m-

iiussia s scnooi ii.li roiiment
Has Risen Since Last War
Hearts Tlmmp, Noms Twitch:
;t

Spring Love Affairs,
Aroma Of Fertilizer
Return To Campus
By JIM HAMPTON

,

Spring is here, and with it have
come two of the greatest hazards
UK students will ever have to face:
11 Sr O's malodorous fertilizer and

fr
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if it

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fi;'l of
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3. A

FEW STATISTICS:

Russia has approximately the same number of
people in schools as we do. though its population
is 200 million to our 170 million. They report one
person out of every four occupied with some kind
of school, if only correspondence courses. We have
the same proportion in regular schools. We have
had a large pupil population for many years, despite the lag in our backward areas.
Russian enrollments reached their present levels
only since the last war. Since 1950. about one in
which is equivalent to our 12 years; something over
every eight youngsters finished 10 years of school,
half of our youngsters finish 12 years. Obviously
the Russian educational program is moving at full

works for the State Department.
Obviously such mismatches are
to be avoided, and in order to as-- ;
siSt the
male in se- -i
lecting a mate. I have compiled
some criteria pertinent to wives
love-strick-

7'

.i,v

,1.

women, contracted to a third in the United Sfafei
One of Russia's to uhrst problems is to raiM1 lhf
level of sihoohr.t; unions it ruckward proplrs, cor
revpondmi: to our Ncsroes. Indians, SpanUh-Americanetc. Morrocr. the half of the Russians wh
live In rural areas hae much lrss schooling than
residents of cities. Most of the roller students
far hue come from the cities and from the Kuro-pea- n
sections of Russia.
The rapid educational advjnce in Russia has not
been solely the special arltlormrnt of the Communist regime, as they claim. Before the Revolution
a large part of the younger people and young adults
were literate and school attendance was tkvrock-etln-

en

The war and Revolution stopped this progress,
and it was not until the 1930s that educational programs again received major attention. Until the
last years advance has been uneven in different,
parts of the population, as can be .hown by some

simple figures.

In the United States enrollments in the
grades total about a third of those in grades
and their selection.
the corresponding ratio In Russia is about a fourth
. First, there is the ugly question
n
For the
parts of the United States of
of money. Two. a