xt7z610vrh9v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z610vrh9v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19421106  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  6, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  6, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7z610vrh9v section xt7z610vrh9v The Kentucky Kernel

WAR CHEST GOAL
$700

Collected To Date
$110.35

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOLUME XXXIV

Z246

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY.

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER

l".

NUMBER

IIM'J

J

I

Thamiksgivieg Holiday Cut To One Day
SGA Apjproves

Year's Budget
to
Legislature Plans
To Buy War Bonds
With $2000 Fund
By NORMA WEATHERSPOON

War bonds will be purchased with
12.000. mhich has been lying idle in
Uie Student Government
association's surplus fund for approximately four years, if President Herman L. Donovan approves the budget adopted by the student legislature at its meeting Tuesday night.
The money, a part of the original
fund of the association, will be put
into bonds with the recommendation that future legislators use the
face value and the interest received
as a part of the Student War fund
when the bonds mature.
Budget Passed
After debate which lasted for
more than an hour, the legislators
passed the following budget:
S2.0O0.O0
War bonds
275.00
Student directories

Printing

140.00
30.00
50.00
50.00

Postage
War chest

Stenographic service
Kentuckian appropriation
Kentuckian pages

670.00

for SGA
Social committee and

30.00
700.00
230.00
192.50

A

Student Loan fund

Miscellaneous
Surplus Remains
A surplus of $1,000 remains in the
treasury for emergencies. This budget has been sent to Dr. Donovan
for his approval or rejection.
The legislature authorized Jim
Collier, president,
to discuss the
distribution cf student fees with
Prank D. Peterson, comptroller.
David Marcus, newly appointed
chairman of the Welfare committee,
reported that his group has begun
of the Student Com- -

mons. It has been found that a meal
which can be purchased at the cafeteria at the University high school
for 25 cents, costs 45 cents at the
University cafeteria.
Other matters which the Welfare
committee plans to investigate later
are the men's dormitories and the
closing of the grill and library during convocation periods.
Marcus
stated that the rooms on the fourth
floor of the men's halls had ceilings
so low that the residents could not
stand upright. These rooms, built
as single rooms, now accommodate
two students each and cost the
same as other rooms in the dormitories.
Drowsy and lethargic except when
money matters were being discussed,
the legislators also disposed of more
routine business.
Secretary Resigns
Elizabeth Chapman resigned as
secretary of the legislature, and
Eloise Bennett, agriculture representative, was chosen to fill the vacancy.
George Warm ick. arts and sciences
senior from Mt. Sterling, was elected to fill the vacancy in the legislative body created when Glenn
Price, who was installed at the previous meeting, had to leave school
to assume military service.
International Students day will be
observed by programs being planned by a special committee of the
SGA in connection with the
This recognition of higher
education will be made on November 17.
Members absent from the meeting were Alex Hall. George Gilbert,
Margaret Erskine, Jack Atchison,
Jerry Eastham, William Schick, and
Kenneth Vanlandingham. Memben
meetings
; who miss three consecutive
are automatically expelled from the
legislature, according to the
tution of the SGA.

former Ld

Ag Students Show
Calves In Louisville
Students in the Agriculture college have calves at the Fat Cattle
show in Louisville this week where
they will compete with other contestants for the Grand Champion
Steer of Kentucky.
Among those attending are Richard Le Grand. Philpot; Lucy B.
Glasgow;
James Jones,
Oliver.
Princeton; Ausbon Judd, Donans-burHolland Thrasher, Ellington;
Harry Gat ton. Bremen; and Russell
Lowe. Green County.
g;

Open House Held

For Soldiers
An informal open house will be
held from 3 to 6 p.m. Sunday in
the Student Union building for the
soldiers stationed at the Phoenix
hotel.
All women students are invited
to attend the affair which is being
sponsored by the War Effort committee of the Union board. Bettye
Howard and Terry Noland are
in charge.

"Claudia." Rose Franken's comedy
of young married life, will open at
8:30 Monday night in the Guignol
theater for a week's run. No matinee is scheduled for Saturday beVircause of the Kentucky-Weginia football game.
Five University students are included in the cast of the production which will be directed by Frank
Fowler. The leading roles of Claudia
and David Naughlon will be played
by Barbara Rehm, arts and sciences
senior, and Jim Purser, arts and
sciences sophomore, respectively.
Hal Hackett. arts and sciences
senior, will play the role of the
"other man." Martin Snyder, law
junior,
will portray Fritz,
the
Naughton hired man, and Jacqueline
Wiedeburg, arts and sciences junior,
wil lenact the role of Bertha, his
wife.
l'r- .tulia Nfnjiih'n. Claudia's
st

TO SAVE TRAVELING FACILITIES

SERVICES FOR

At

the

NEW MEMBERS
Recognition Set
In Bluegrass Room
At 8 P. 1. Tuesday
Candlelight
recognition
services
for all new members of YWCA will
be held at 8 p. m. Tuesday in the
Bluegrass room of the Union building.
The entire membership will participate in the candlelighting ceremony which symbolizes the fellowship of the University YW with the
entire international organization.
The YW advisory board and new
cabinet members will be presented
(
to the group.
Talks based on the principles,
standards, motives, and organizational set-u- p of the association will
be given. Speakers will be Jane
Bilk,
Sarah Anne
Hall, secretary: Carolyn
Spicer,
treasurer; and Ruth Wheat, membership chairman. Jeannette Graves,
president, will preside at the ser-

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aiiion wjN ilccmcd mtcv.iry in itw ol the clloits ol
llic n 1 ii
ol irjiisporut ion (utilities lo
ii I to limit the
li.ivel tNMiili.il to die u.ir ttlort. (.o eminent otliial and those
ii"Miisil)le for transoi t;ition futilities in this area have .tx.il('l

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to ihe l'iiictsity authorities to make adjustments in its vatution
sihetlules to retime tratl to the minimum and espciiallv to avoid
weekend use ol luises and trains.

vs'lvl

While the L'nixersitv will not he in session on I l),inksui in
students are nietl lo iHiate in the solution of the n.niv
n ion problem bv remaining in Lexington.

President I)onoan will aoiiit a loinmitiec ol latuliv mem
hers and students to ((insider I lie adjustments that sltonld i
made in the Christmas holiday in the lii;lit of the above than;e.
and with a view to fuither ixxrution in the government s ef
fort to solxe the transportation problem.

"

TO BE CLOSED
Only New Students
To Be Admitted

i

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VA.

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In coiinei lion with the one-dalet ess at I hankst;i inj;. the
and students is tailed to the following
rule itl.uinn to absent ts from tlass before and after a holitl.n:
"Any student absent from tlass on ihe day immetliatelv pieted
i i 14 or following a holiday
shall have a itiuhv of one quarter
hour and one quality oint atlded to his requirements for graduation unless excused by the (oinmittee on Scholarship and
The Registrar shall tall (or a report of suth absenees
and shall enter all those reported on ihe student's permanent

at ten tii mi of the l.itultv

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retold."
LEO M. CIIAMBERLAIN
DEAN OF THE VXIVERSITY AND REGISTRAR

Lt. Col. John E. Brannan. professor of Military Science and Tac...
i ii
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i
m ill
iB tmnm,r
i
in
tics, has announced that the Enlisted Reserve Corps will be closed
Prioto Sjr John Patton
to freshmen after December 31, 1942.
"EF A GAL KETCHES YO' THEN, YORE HERN"
Freshmen now enrolled in the
So you'd hrttri wuli Ii out, Mrl Brewer and Mun'in Alters, or those guls will get you in n
University may join the Enlisted
Reserve Corps until the end of this "Murrxiii' Sum Jam." Duisx Mtifs picluied tire " Dyuuniite" Martin. Julia Johnson ami Belt Mt
year. Future quotas will be filled by Clanuhuii.
students entering the University
after January 1. 1943. Freshmen
wishing to join the Enlisted Reserve Corps, must do so before that
time.
All freshmen desiring to enlist in
the ERC must first apply to Dr.
M. M. White. Personnel Director,
for a certificate of eligibility. This
certificate will be issued to freshmen in lieu of the certificate now
issued by the various deans for
upperclassmen.

nt

'

152 Make Over 2.0

Standing In A&S

.

.

Put On Your Glad Rags Boys;
The Climax Occurs Tomorrow

"The Jungle negro" is the
subject to be discussed by Dr.
W. D. Funkhouser at 10 o'clock
today In the third open class
of the current series. The class,
meeting in Room 8 of the Biological Sciences building, will
be thrown open to all students
who wish to attend.
Dr. Funkhouser, head of the
department of zoology and dean
of the Graduate school, has

sophisticated sister-in-lawill be
done by Mrs. R. D. Montondo, while
Mrs. J. Huntley Dupre will be presented as Claudia's mother. Madame
opera
Daruschka,
an eccentric
singer, will be played by Mrs. Paul
Little.
Claudia is the affectionate,
child-wif- e
rained
of a somewhat dignified and successful young
architect. The Naughtons live on
a small farm within commuting dis- tance of New York where David has
his business.
Claudia is extremely naive, loves
dill pickles, can't keep a check
book straight, and doesn't understand why her husband should have
to pay income tax. She allows a
complete stranger to kiss her and
then is surprised that her husband
doesn't give her a big hug because
she is glamorous enough to attract
other men.
Her worst fault, listening in on
other people's telephone conversations, leads her to suffer a severe
jolt when she learns that her mother,
whom she idolizes, will soon die of
tn ineurahle disease

Noveiiilx r

U'cilni-xl.iv-

to limit iIr- I lia nk.
i liolid.iv to oik
usual on rri
NovcihIht .'t. CIunno w ill uicit
S.iiiii(la. No t'liiIxT -- i ami 'JJ.

Imi mI.i

;iiul

xi i

A

an apprentice seaman at the Great
Lakes Naval Training school.
Visiting here this week, Caldwell
ar

in

d.i

Day.

RESERVE CORPS

Funkhouser Holds

"sea-son-

i

.1

i.-- j

Mabel Gumm, violinist, and Miss
Adele Gensemer, pianist, will provide music for the ceremonies.

Jim Caldwell, former editor of
The Kernel who was graduated
from the University in 1941. Is now

in his
was completely
bell bottom trousers, middy blouse,
and navy tan.
Said he: "My greatest experience
to date has been trying to sleep in
a hammock." It seems the darn
tilings are anything but stable, and
as difficult to mount as a balky
horse.
"I've found myself on the floor
in the middle of the night three
times," our sailor said. "Thump,
thud, and
"c,!cr," echo through
the barracks nightly as the landsmen attempt to master the hammock art.

..

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Stand The Test,
You're The Guest

ow A Gob

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Look Your Best,

Sea-sonal- S

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vices.

Open Class Today

gathered information about rare
animal life through extensive

world travels.
plan, inaugThe open-claurated last year, permits students to "sample" interesting
lectures in classes for which
they are not enrolled.
ss

first Night "Claudia" Curtain
Rises 8:30 Monday At Guignol
Franken Comedy
To Run For Week;
No Matinee Set

ACTION IS DEEMED NECESSARY

YWCA TO HOLD

The play concerns

the transition
of this child-lik- e
character into a
mature young woman who can no
longer depend wholly on others to
take her over the bumps of life.
Claudia first appeared as the
heroine of a magazine series published In "Red Book" magazine.
Later these individual short stories
were incorporated in the play, entitled simply "Claudia."'
Little incidents, which might occur in the home life of any young
married couple make the characters
into real people although they do
not figure in the plot of the play.
It is these little incidents that
should make "Claudia" worth seeing.
Students who wish to see this
production must make reservations
at the theater previous to the night
of the performance they wish to
attend. Guignol tickets, distributed
during registration, plus fifty cents,
will admit University students.
may be made by
Reservations
calling 5412 after 10 a. m. It is
necessary that the whole card be
presented at the box office before
7 t.n the night of h pley.

I have your second
may sound incongruous
d
coming from a dainty
but
that's what you can expect at the
annual Sadie Hawkins dance Saturday night.
The
dance will be held from 9 until 12
in the Bluegrass room of the Union
building. Costumes are required;
girls will do all breaking; no sta;s
allowed. Tickets may be purchased
for 75 cents from members of Cwens,
Keys, or sororities, or at the door.
All boys must have a "This is my
man" tag.
are planned, one of
Six
which will honor the organization
selling the most tickets for the
dance. The troubadours from Frankfort will play.
Ethics for behavior at the affair
have been formulated by the authorities and should be strictly observed.
Girls, be sure to call for your date
early (remember how it feels to get
asked at the last minute). Don't
forget that
corsaRe;
fashion specialists suggest radishes
and celery for a blue suit, purple
and white grapes for a brown suit,
or cauliflower for a tux. Take along
plenty of cigarettes and gum and
money for feeding your date before
the dance, after the dance, and during intermission. Make proper ar-- r
a n g e m e n t s for transportation,
Get your
busses arc acceptable.
early
man fixed up with
so he won't feel that he's going to
be a wallflower.
Boys, be ready on time idon't be
mean and try to get even with the
girls for all the waiting they've
caused you'. Appreciate all the
little things your escorts do for you
and let them know it. This includes
opening doors, helping with coats,
And for
and other gallantries.
goodness sake don't get out your
razors and start shaving during
intermission.
"May

co-e-

Sweater Swing
Held Tuesday
The second sweater swing of
the quarter will be held from
4 to 6 p. in. Tuesday in the
Bluegrass room of the Union.

Rough Revere Rides Again,
Dauntless through rlhe iSighl

Listen, my children, and you shall'
hear.
Of the second ride of Paul Revere;
Twas November the. second in '42.
When the hero came, we don't
know who.
Yes, our modern Paul was gallop-

ing across the campus on his Victory bike, clomp, clomp, clomp, paying absolutely no attention to the
Keep-Osigns.
His henchman, probably suffering
from an overdose of something or
other, evidently got his signals
mixed. Not two lights, not even one
light appeared in the tower of the
old north Memorial hall. Twas
completely dark.
Well, there was Paul still clomping along. And then he came to the
barbed wire fence outside McVey
hall. To make matters simple, he
ran into it.
Dobbin, his trusty mount, punctured one tire when he hit one of
the iron posts and you know what
that means. Paul himself broke his
h
dog chain and tore a
square out of his zoot suit.
h
It was just too much for the old
digger
boy. He took his post-hoout of his saddle bags, dug up the
posts, and disappeared toward Rose
street with posts, wire, and all.
And that, children, is where the
darn thing went, or had you missed
it?
ff

he-Grass

ankle-lengtfive-inc-

le

Research Club
To Hold Lectures
"A view of the Modern Biological
Sciences" is the general topic of
discussion for lectures to be given
before the Biological Research club
during the quarter, it was announced by Dr. R. N. Weaver, leader cf
the group.
The fir.t meeting will be held
Thursday. November 12, and will be
:n "The Origin and Nature of
Life." Sneakers will include Dr W.
D. Valleau. Dr. R. N. Jeffrey. Dr.
W. R. Allen, and Dr. A. C. McFar-lanA round table discussion will
iU be
conclude the meeting and
led by Dr. John Kuiper.
The affair will be open to all
members of the research club as
f is other f'arilltv nienilw's
e.

UK GRADUATE
SCHEDULED FOR
NEXT MUSICALE
Mary Louise McKenna Knapp.
University graduate, will present
the next musicale at 4 p. m. Sunday in Memorial hall.
A soprano. Mrs. Knapp has been
studying voice in New York since
1939, when she was graduated from
the University, with the Bachelor
of Science degree in music. Through
the cooperation of Lexington music
lovers, she was sent to New York
to study with Mme. Maria Gay
Zenatello and Dr. Jascha Rushkin.
In New York, the young singer
for several seasons was a member
of the Radio City Music Hall ensemble and appeared in the stage
productions and on the Sunday'
Music Hall of the Air programs. In
the fall of 1941. she sang with the
New Opera company.
In her concert Sunday. Mrs.
Knapp will be accompanied at the
piano by Adele South Gensemer.
rt
program of classic
A
and operatic numbers will be presented by the artist in her recital
Sunday.
Opening with Handel's "Oh Sleep.
Why Dost Thou Leave Me?" from
"Semele" she will sing next
"Song." and an aria. "Deh
vieni non tardar." from "The Marriage of Figaro," by Mozart.
A French group including compositions of Faure. Debussy and
Hahn. and several selections by
Brahms, and Strauss will be included in the concert.
An aria from Verdi's "Aida."
"L'insana parola." will be the featured piece. Mrs. Knapp will conclude with English selections by
Rachmaninoff. Schnecker. Gianinni.
and Charles, including "In the Silence of the Night." and "A Kiss in
the Rain."
Ushers for the concert will be
members of Phi Beta and Phi Mil
Alpha, honorary music fraternities.
They are Anita Roos. Betty Aldrich.
Priscilla Graddy. Laura Jean Blake.
Shirley Kilgore, Wanda
Austin.
Perry Adams. Ralph Kemp. Paul
NrH
:'!1
Temfive-pa-

Tena-Klia-

-

's

Highest Students
Are Announced
Iy Dean's Office

Griffith. Ralph U Oullett.

M.
bel

Ma-

Gumm. Helen Harrison.
George J. Hermann. John N. Hole-maFrances L. Jenkins.
s.
Dale V. Keith. Martha T.
Martha Cary McCauley. Wil- Uam Howard McCollum. Arthur C.
Mcrarian. fearah A. M. Mclnteer.
Ma,7 King Martina. Robert W.
Meyer. James C. Moore, Roberta
Parker. Ellen Jane PurcelL Richard
E. Richards, Anita Mae Roos. Lewis
Sawin. Lawrence Schneider. Alfred
P. Shire. William A. Shire. Jr . Willie J. Silvers. William J. Smith.
Carolyn Spicer. Adalin Stern. Lillian E. Terry. Frebert V. Thompson.
Mary
James L. Vallandingham.
Norma Weatherspoon. James William Young.
C.

n.

One hundred and fifty-tw- o
stu
dents in the arts and sciences col
lege made a standing of 2.0 or above
for the second semester. 1941-4according to a report received yes- terday from the dean's office.
They are as follows:
Seniors
Robert Amnions. Jeanne Aplus-till- e.
Jane Birk. Frances Bogie.
Martha F. Booher. Virginia Jane
Breeding. Juliette Bryson. Virginia
Callos. Mario Thos. Catini, Elizabeth Grimes Chapman. Jane Esther
Cramer, George F. Doyle. Elsie M.
Fleishman. Arthur W. Francis. Anne
Fuss.
Richard Gard. Russell Gil key. Sue
Fart Gooding. Jeanette Graves. Jane
Lee Humphrey. John Morse Kelly.
Mary Kent. David W. Kinnaird.
Trilby McKeehan. John Phillips
Neely, Wharton Nelson. Anne Over-streCharles L. Pope.
Emma Porter, Seymour S. Pudding. John D. Reeve, Marjorie Jean
Reynolds. Susanna B. Reynolds,
Mary L. Rion. Ruth Robinette.
Rowland,
George Roth, Frances
Salmon. Stanley M. Saunier.
Frank G. Skillman. Marshall D.
Smith. Patricia Snider. Harry C.
Sunderman.
Joan Emery Taylor.
Shirley Thomas. George Warwick.
Treva Whayne. Helen Baird Wilson,
Betsy B. Woodford. Hylan H. Wood- James M. Wooldridge, Mar- June Wyatt.

Kop-piu-

2.

Bas-ket-

Old-jor-

Juniors

Perry Adams. Bernadine Aulick,
Betty Avent. C. Edwin Barnes. Ce- lia Bederman. Betty E. Bohannon.
Cleon K. Combs. Robert H. Cundiff.
S. Dickson. Douglas W.
Faris, Anne Elizabeth Fryer. Flor-- 1
ida R. Garrison. Mary Jessica Gay.
George F. Gilbert. Ann M. Gil- lespie. John C. Goodlett, Richard

Kampus
Kernels

Elizabeth Aldrich. Mrs. Julie H
Aldrich. Richard Arnspiger, John
Atchison, George William Ballon.
t.
Gene Barr. Virginia Stuart
Alice
Benton. John Boyer
Brown. Kenneth Cameron, Mary
Elizabeth
Crawford.
Sue Dell
Ewing. Earl James Farrell, Nancy
Faulkner. Ann C. Felts, Phyllis R.
Freed. Jack Thomas Giannini. Mary
G. Gillespie. Robert A. Gold. Sony
S. Gravenkemper. Led ford G. Greij-Wilory. Edyth B. Heaton. Ollie J. Hurst,
James B. Jones. Margaret P. Keller.
Bruce Kennelly. Mary Patricia Lewis. Helen P. Lipscomb.
A
Marv
James McTierman.
Macke. Baxter F. Melton. Lucy O
Meyer. Virginia F. Mitchell. Eliza-sobeth L. Nollau. Charlotte P.
ham. Ruth Pace. Marjorie Palmorf.
Thomas J. Penn. Harry Potts. Car- roll H. Robie, Jr.. Virginia L e r
Rosen. Murrell Leon Salutsky.
James H. Saunders. James F. Scott.
Charlsley J. Shearer. Mary
beth Stigall. Morrison J. Swift,
Jesse S. Tyler. Oscar C. Wright,
Marian Yates.
Freshman (2nd Sent.)
Bonnie Jane Wooten.
Eliza-Algern-

,
j

LAMP AND CROSS . . .
. . will hold an important meetint
at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the Foot hall
room of the Union builtlirg. Jim
president.
announced.
Crowley.
Members should get their dinners
at the cafeteria.
.

WOMEN
TODAY . . .
is the last day on which stu.

dents may obtain their directories,
George Gilbert, director, has announced. The directories may be
obtained all day in Room 127 of
the Union building.
A; STl DENTS . . .
are asked to participate in
showing prize animals in the Ag
Fall festival. They will be showing
under experienced judges and will
thereby gain experience.
DI T( II LI Nt II . . .
club will meet for lunch today
in the Football room of the Union

ie

...

who wish lt be rushed for the
second pledging day for social sororities. November 23. must sign up
In the dean of women's office immediately.
No rush fee is beum
charged.
IMON CALENDAR
Today
Chess club, card room. 3 p in
Saturday
Sadie Hawltii.s dance. Bluegrass
room. 9 to 12 p.m.
Sunday
Open house for soldiers at Phoenix. 3 to J p.m.
Monday
.s pm
Cwfis, room JIH. I
.

.

* The Kernel Editorial Page

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
DURTNO THE SCHOOL YEAR
OR EXAMINATION PFRIpOS

FfTHI.lEHRn

rXORPT HOLIDAYS
Liit-rrt-

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the Port Office at Lntnpton,
matter tinder the Art of Mnrrh

Kentnrky,
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IVaikicia S.Mnrk
FU'lTY

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the
articles cud rnlnwim ere fo oe nnuirr-.
nrrrsnnn
of the writer themeiin, and ito
the itpmum ftf The Kernel.
tetlett
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Sludciils. miii arc Kiili; lo have i shell hi .i
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w planned lor the w.i thesi.
Ixiailsl WC ll.nl tllUIKfd III) I lie kernel tllllvi
tiiliuiinjr SUMI and I Ik- kcutiukiaii
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ibis week a vers muiteiius ikiic was sent
the itiiiiittnller in ilic diictlui il .uUita
lions sav ing in pan.
"This is a laudable altitude on tin- pan of
he kernel
those administering ihc f .
of
:iik1 The Kentut kian. Ii slums .i ;imkI sphit.
To make a contribution is annilier ipiesiinu
uhith cannot te legally done bv tin- 1'.. i.ml ol
Trustees to sav noiliing ol those ailininisit i inj;
I he affairs of The Kernel and The kcniui kian."
Tlie rest of the letter was siaiiui; ili.ii ii was
in regard to the ictpicsi ol the publit al ions loi
the contributions. anl the signature.
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e have alwavs said thai it is a wcmili i lul
iliing to know where one stands in repaid lo
one's linantcs. Inn in ibis lav we ol I lie kernel
aie in llie dark. We tan'l sjnak for I lie
Thr It !!, I ill Truslrrs .in'l sax
use i lie inoiu-x- . whiih we ai- sine we li.ixt-jer tan'l sa we an iis' ii: aiiai cut l the
an't sav we an use it. at least lie
urn ltyi!li-- r
lid not mention the tut.
10 run jroudlv in the ears ol I he
We ust-nel llial we were I'M) jk i eiu student ou lied
kei
Well, we lound oui that neiilier
and
was correct. si it ajK'ars that we will hae to
ImmK
discount taking a vote amon the siiuh-iio M t if the monev can Ik-- used.
Maxlie we are lianki iiH. and they have
iliev ihouhi
from telliii; us
llie shok itiio lit Ik' loo great, liul no. J hat
ken-lutkia-

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.

lau'i

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we

so.

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our che

iiioiiiIi. aixl lliex haven't siopjied

ks

HOLLAND'S INVASION

THE FREE LANCE
our series on the
who
more nauseous demagogues
man the American political battle-fron- t,
we do not wish to leave the
impression that the populace is the
unfortunate, but innocent, victim of
conspirators
a few unscrupulous
against the public weal.
If that were the case, we would
find very few such rabble-rousein a democracy; but the contrary
is patently true. For every
for everv OTJaniel there are
a thousand followers with the same
rs

e,

narrow-mindedne-

and

ss

bigotry-Grea- t

masses with that fanatical
conviction and righteous indignation, the characteristic possession of
the ignorant, are the raw material
from which these men are made.
The leader differs from the followers only in ability and opportunity.

Their

thought-procet-s-

es

are

same.
Such

the

a man is Representative
Martin Dies, our nominee for the
tit le "most dangerous man in Con

TI.MK Ol T

w MTV

-

1
wag..

a starving woman, ami even more
lo one who is watching her ihild
starve. It makes a difference lo the Russian on
the front lo know that his wife and children are
gelling enough lo eai and lo wear.
It gives them courage lo light, knowing that
llicir loved ones are Iteing cared for lv the allies
at ross the seas. The prisoner in the camp w ill
ii v io make opoi tunii ies 10 get awav. to nv
salxnage. it Ik- has hern aided ly his tountrv- -

morale ol

u

--

1

-

II.

Somewhere in llie world there is a human
lieing thing for everv dollar that The keinel
did not (oim ilinie lo the fund lo help llie ill
and hea i Isick. One hundied men. women and
tliildieu will die ol starvation. exisure. lai k
of mediial supplies. Inillel wounds. IioiiiIis. and
havotiei ilirusis iM'tause llie rel lape of officialdom whal offitialdoni we know not has
prevented our given any money.
Red taie stitched and knotted in the lcsl
olliiial manner shall le their shroud.
So. students, it is up lo you. Do not let us
Ikiijv our trust. We must give the iiiom that
soliciwe t an to the drive." Remember, ii is
in one, and there will le no more like
tations
drives on the campus.
II our men tan light, we tan give.

gress today." His technique differs
markedly from the yokel - baiting
trio Talmadge. Smith, and O'Dan-ie- l
for Dies is after a more substantial and sophisticated following; and he is gettiilg it.
Now, as is well known, there has
been nothing since the days of infidels and witches in the Middle
Ages
which has so consistently
aroused the passions, fears, and
prejudices of the plodding middle-clas- s
citizenry as a good,
Red scare. Its mast brilapplication to
liant propagandist
date, of course, has been in Germany, but the devotees of this particular brand of mob appeal are not
lacking even at this critical time.
The venerable cult of
in the United States has appeared
to suffer very little from the fact
that "Red" Russia has been fighting
our battle for nearly a year and a
half with almost microscopic support. Mrs. Elizabeth Dilling. William Pelley. and a few other petty
Fascists have been arrested while
Red-baiti-

those in high places, a thousand
times more harmful to the war effort, remain immune.
Martin Dies and his band of
snoopers known as the Committee
for the Investigation of
Activities should rank as the
organnumber one
ization in the country, though there
is but feeble hope that such will be
the case or. indeed, that an
activity will ever be defined. The committee has received
somewhat less publicity of late, presumably because no suitable liberals have been found for smear
purposes, but the latest appropriation is doubtless being poured down
the sewer at the same rate as the
o'her (400.0000 within the past four
years.
It may be that the only possible
remedy for a man like Dies is to
have him live up to his most appropriate name, but we are convinced that the only permanent cure is
avoidance of the Dies mentality
among the voting population.

iim n

fJtZi

Musical Mutterings
By Charlie Gardner
On lsat Friday night, your col- Before arriving at Dixieland,
three-wee- k
had an interview with one dar" cam fronl
at the Riviera club in
.
i gagement
a string
saxi-sts- ,
Louis Jordan, who brought Columbus. Ohio, and also
through the Middle
of
his
combination to the
Dixieland Club, Lexington's finest West. In two weeks from now. until
Christmas, the band will be playing
ctlored nightery. for a
at thpntprs nf fine week each in
engagement.
.Washington.
Detroit.
Baltimore.
Jordan, who played in the well- Cleveland. Hartford, and then in
u.ovsii uiu ViiivK weoQ orcnesira, New york for tw0 wpeks
is an
reed man. giving out
back to Cnicago for an en- on alto, tenor, and soprano saxes, gagement from December 25 until
and also clarinet. He isn't outstand- - February io at the Down Beat Room
ing on any certain one of these in- - of tne Qgn-ici- j
Bar
struments but an expert on each
Jordan's latest recordings were re- He has an individual stvle that isn't leaser! on
the Decca label vesterdav.
copied, and cannot be copied be- - An original bv Louis is the main
cause only he himself can make a fea(ure of thu platler entitled
horn talk the wav his does. Jordon Down Dirty Shame." Vocals are
by all musicians as by
is
the leader and features that fine
one of the top saxists of today. He and smooth alto sax. Tricky lyrics
started not so long ago and is now are also able to be mentioned. On
on his way to fame by having a the reverse is "I'm Gonna Leave
combination of five men. including You on the Outskirts of Town." with
himself, that really satisfies Mr. vocals again by Jordan with the
Public, no matter what type of a words similar to those of Lunce-ford- 's
popular music lover he may be.
"Gonna Move to the Out- Jordan's outfit is composed of skirts."
Arnold Thomas pounding the piano.
Fine teamwork is evident on both
Dallas Bartley slapping the bass sides with the former more rhythmic
fiddle, Eddie Byrd beating the Bl,d with a faster tempo in spots,
drums, and Eddie Roane tooting highlighted by solid beating put
the trumpet. The whole crew has forth by drummer Eddie Byrd. For
been together now for two and a real entertainment and for real
half years without a break. Thomas
jive, by all means be sure
hails from Atlantic City and. before to hear these records as soon as pos- joining Jordan, was a music teach- - yjble because I don't think they will
er at a high school in that town, be in stock very long.
specialist and
He is a
This is strictly a jan: and jump
can really pound out the "88."
outfit and with the personality man- Byrd was playing drums with the ifested by all five musicians. Louis
Alabama State Collegians when Jordan and his orchestra is our
Jordan called him into his musical nomination for the fines: small com- threshold to be the hideman. Byrd bination of 1942.
Good luck to you and the fellows.
is a fine showman and has a lot of
fine licks along with a terrific beat. Louis, and "keep
Bartley left the King Pollack band
in Chicago to take over the bull fiddle duties. Dallas does not have the
"slap-stic- k
comedy" style as is
One should never trust a woman
found with so many bassists of to- who tells her real age. A woman
day, but instead, he produces a fine who would tell one that would tell
tone that sets the entire rhythm sec- - one anything0scar Wilde,
l.on off with the groovie touch.
His home is in Springfield. Mo
man must be
Every normal
Roane decided to leave Eddie Dur
at wines, io spit, on uus
ham s band to go with Jordan, tak- ing his trumpet with him and leav- - hands, hoist the black flag, and beL. Mencken.
ing his home in Hartford. Conn. 8in slitting throats-- H.
Roane blows open something like
y
Roy Eldridge. trumpeter with Gene
I have often found persons of
Krupa. but is not an imitator. He handsome appearance
to be the
has a very hif;h range and does ex- - worst, and those of evil appearance
cellent work with mutes also.
to be the bev Phaedius.
Jor-umn-

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rs

five-pie-

one-nig- ht

Semi-Fina-

boogie-woog-

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Diy

M'

JrMi,

Li'l AtiAr'( nicldmtr

som-'ria-

it

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just tra::.er.

Moody

Jolley

is one who can re- An
member back when grocers used to
put dates on coffee bass .so you
could tell they hadn't been on the
shelf long.
old-tim-

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CHESS
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FOR MEN

Printed here is a letter written by the University