xt7z610vrj29 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z610vrj29/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420310  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 10, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7z610vrj29 section xt7z610vrj29 The Ken TUC ky Kernel

ON PAGE TWO
The Pal heads Can
Always Be i viititi

VGI UMF XXXII

11 IMiAY, MARCH

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY.

Z246

admission tickets at $1 each and
a block of reserved seats in the
center section of the stands,
selling at $1.50 each, for the
basketball game with the
Great Lakes team Saturday in
Louisville, are on sale at the
athletic office, it has been announced by S. A. Boles, manager
of ticket sales.
Mr. Boles said the tickets will
be available here only through
Wednesday, after which the remainder must, be returned to
Louisville.

-

10,

'f5

v

i;

W. W

-

fill

.

VC

i

.

til

.

r4

w
1

COLLIER RESIGNS
AS CHAIRMAN OF

v"

'
IK

TROUPERS
h 20 to

through the perjormame they will give Man

o

hrlp raise funds (or the ODK field

house drive.

NEW JUDICIARY
Committee Holds
First Meeting;
Sets Up Rules

Troupers Will Appear March 20
To Bolster ODK Field House Fund

James Collier, law student and
former head of the Constitutionalist
party, yesterday resigned as chairman of the newly established Student Government Association Judiciary committee.

The second campus appearance of
Troupers. University student enterbe held Friday.
tainers group,
March. 20, in Alumni gymnasium,
yesterday.
it was annour-ce- d
Net proceeds of the show will go
to the field house fund being raised
by Omicron Delta Kappa, men's
leadership honorary, sponsor of the
Trouper's show.
The Troupers group is an all tudent
company of acrobats, dancers
clowns, and
gymnasts,
singers,
singers. Approximately 60 students
mill take part in next week's performance.
Twenty-tw- o
acts will be featured
in the program which lasts for almost two hours.
During its two years of existence,
the Troupers company has appeared before audiences totalling oven
10.000 persons.
This year, shows
have been presented at Union college, twice at Fort Knox, at the
state high school press association
convention, the meeting of the State
engineers society, the southeastern
athletic conference meet, and at
other smaller meetings.
Next week's show is the only campus appearance of Troupers open
to students, faculty, and the public.

Henry Bramblet. appointed temporary chairman of the committee,
conducted the meeting cf the group
yesterday afternoon in the law
building at which time the committee set up rules of procedure for
cases.
A chairman of the Judiciary committee will have to be appointed by
the student legislature.
Cases heard by the Judiciary committee, which was provided for in
the recently passed SGA constitutional amendment, must follow a
venue similar to that of the state
court of appeals.
Petitions must be in writing and
must be filed seven days before a
meeting of the committee. Meetings will be on the first and third
Thursdays of each month.
One copy of the petition must be
given to the defendant in the particular case.

LK Concert Band Presents
Mnsicale Sunday Afternoon

By WILT AH GRAVES
"Bolero" Maurice Ravel, with its
modern direction, was the outstanding number of the musicale presented Sunday afternoon by the
University Concert band, under the
direction of Mr. C. V. Magurean.
Other piltces which illustrated
many styles of rhythm and melodic
expression were played and attacks
and releases were shown together
with excellent taste.
The brass section was very good
with special mention given to the
cornets for their skill in Jericho"
and "There's Something About a
Soldier." A pleasing blend of instruments were maintained throughout
the program. Perfect timing was illustrated by the percussion section.
Our national anthem was played
by the band before the program was
presented. The first group included
"Pantomime," from "II Cid" by
with fine tone quality displayed
by the French horn, and "Spanish
Comedy," by Bela with its changing
tempos.
In the second group of the "Core-natio- n
Scene" from the opera, "Boris
Godounow" by Moussorgsky was the
first selection. The chimes begin the
weird, oriental picture and the coronation march appears in the middle. "Bolero" concluded this group.
"Jericho" by Gould, with its modern harmony and syncopation,
"Spiritual Rivers" by Gualt, with
strains of familiar negro spirituals,
and "There's Something About a
Soldier" by Gay. with counter
A survey to determine student
sweater themes on bugle calls concluded the
interest in the
sessions of the Student Union Board Program.
r an encore e Dana played the
will be conducted from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. today in the book store ana tne soothing "Angels of Mercy" by Irving
Berlin.
Union building.
The House committee of the Stu- Pantomim. from
"II Cid"
Antonio Sacchini
dent Union board, which arranges
March
the informal afternoon dances,
Aria
postponed the sweater session schedFinal
Kellnr Bela
uled for this afternoon to await re- Spanish Comedy Overture
II
sults of the survey.
Coronation Scene, from
"Boris Godoumow"
- Moussorksky
"We are attempting both to find
Bolero
Maurice Ravel
the extt-n- of interest in the sweater
in
.
sessions and hear suggestions for Jericho
Martin Gould
Prologue
improvement
of the programs,"
Roll Call
Margaret Blackerby, chairman of
The Chant
Dance
the house committee, said yesterday.
March and Battle
Forms on which five questions are
Joshua's Trumpets
Walls Came Tumbling Down
at desks in
asked will be distributed
Hallelujah
the entrance of the Great hall in the Spiritual Rivers Overture
George Gault
Union building and aLso in the book rtiere's Something About
A Soldier
Noel Gay
store.
One of the questions will deter- mine whether student prefer campus
orchestra music or music from re- cordings broadcast through the ball
room public address system which
was tried for the first time at the
last sweater session.
Ah, navy life.
Unless approximately 500 students
participate in the survey, the sweaJames R. Taylor, voted the
ter sessions may be discontinued,
best dressed man on the camMargaret Blackerby added.
pus last year, says that life at
The next sweater session will be
the Great Lakes Naval TrainTuesday and the dance will be
held
ing station isn't all milk and
planned after requsts of students
honey. Says he, "The other day
from the survey.
a superior officer came around
and asked each of us if we liked
the food. Everyone said 'yes',
Dr. E S. Maxwell will present a
but when he asked me I told
him that the food was awful
lecture on clinical pathology before
Society at its
and that I hadn't had a decent
the Pryor
meal since I had been there.
meeting at 7:30 pm., Thursday, in
He asked my name, and the
room 313 of the Biological Science
next day I got a notice that I
building.
was assigned to duty in the mess
This talk will be supplemented by
hall for the weekend "
specimens. All
and
Life is like that
other Biological students are urged
to be present
Sac-chi-

QUESTIONS ON

SWEATER SWING

TO BE ASKED
Poll To Be Taken
On Student Opinion
At Regular Session

j

i

t

Best Dressed Man
Finds Life Hard
At Great Lakes

Maxwell To Speak

al

Wildcats Oil Up
Wcm Gcl Machine

NUMBER

1012

Rockwell To Talk;
Hill Says Clasess
Will Not Dismiss

Uni-versi- ly

y

i Ouk

UNIVERSITY OP KENTUCKY
Limited Number Of
Tickets Sent Here FOR MEN CALLED
For Naval Game
THIS AFTERNOON
A limited number of general

I

ON PAG ti

ni

LAW JOURNAL

FEATURES NOTE
BY HAMMOND
Alary B. Jackson
Is Second Woman
Ever To Be Editor
By NORMA VVEATHERSPOON
Edited by Mary Barton Jackson
and featuring a leading note by
Robert S. Hammond, the March
issue of the Kentucky Law Journal
also contains eight other notes and
comments by University students.
This is the firt issue for which Mrs.
Jackson, second woman ever to be
chosen editor of the Journal, has
served as editor in chief.
Hammond, a second year law
student, wrote his first article, "Price
v. Neal and Double Forgeries," for
this issue of the Journal. It was
given the coveted position of leading
note, a place usually reserved for
the articles of senior students.
Other student written notes and
comments are: "Payment of Social
Security Tax as Evidence of Master-ServaRelationship", by Charles
V. Shipley;
Physcial
"Individual
Characteristics as Affecting the
Standard Care in Criminal Negligence Cases," by R. M. Spragens;
"The Scope of
by John A. Fulton; "Objective Factors as Part of the Circumstances
in Cases Involving Civil Negligence,"
by Helen Stephenson; "Bailments
the Parking Lot Cases," by John
Howe; "Unsatisfied
Judgment
against
the Servant as a Bar
to Suit against the Master," by R.
Pollard White; and "Mislaid Property Money in Traveling Bag," by
Henry Howe Bramblet.
Harry W. Roberts, Jr., graduate of
the law school in 1941, is the author
of one of the three leading articles
in the Journal. He wrote "The Law
on Abridgement cf Copyrighted Literary Material." Roberts, who re
ceived his A. B. and M. A. from
Texas Christian University before
taking his LL.B. at the University,
is a practicing attorney in Clinton,
Kentucky.
nt

If there

is

a constitutional

ques-

tion involved in the case, pertinent
sections of the constitution must
be quoted as is the custom in such
proceedings, Bramblet said.
In most cases, there must be an
actual controversy involved, Bram
blet said, adding that, at the discretion of the committee, advisory
opinions might be handed down.
There are no cases pending for
consideration
of the committee,
Bramblet added, explaining that the
committee would establish its judicial precedents in the first cases.
A complete list of the rules will be
available to students in the SGA
offices of the Union building soon.
In his letter of resignation to the
student legislature yesterday. Col
lier said,
"Because of my close connection
in originating the amendment which
created the Judiciary committee,
and being instrumental in its pas
sage, I think it is best for Student
Government that I decline this
coveted position."
Collier was on the committee
which drew up the amendment recently made part of the SGA con-

stitution.

A general convocation for all men
.students will be held at 3 p. m. today in Memorial hall when Col.
Robert L. Rockwell, head of the air
corps board at the University, discusses "Military Opportunities" in
the opening session of the Men's
Vocational
conference
Guidance
spoasnred by the Student Government Association.
Men will not be dismissed from
class for this convocation by the
University administrators but individual professors may give students
permission to attend. Dean Hill announced yesterday.
Colonel Rockwell will discuss
such topics as the kind of training
ar.d the opportunities for advance
ment in military occupations. This
will be a general introduction for
the group discussions which will follow on Wednesday.
"Problems Facing the Selectee"
will be discussed by Ed Gough, secretary of the local draft board, at
3 p. m. Wednesday in the Y Lounge
of the Union building. Ivan Potts.
Scabbard and Blade president, is
the student chairman for this meeting.
Colonel Rockwell will conduct a
discussion on "Opportunities and
Requirements of the Air Corps" at
4 p , m. Wednesday, in room 204 of
the Union building. This conference
is in charge of Douglas Montondo.
Major Lysle W. Croft will discuss
"Infantry, Artillery, and the Medical Corps" at 4 p. m. Wednesday
in room 206 of the Union. Lloyd
Ramsey, cadet colonel, is the student director.
"The Marines"
is the subject
chosen by Lt. J. R. Peters, commanding officer in charge, Louisville, for his lecture in room 205 at
4 p. m. Wednesday.
Pete Spare,
captain of Pershing Rifles, is in
charge of this meeting.
"The Navy" by Harold T. Turner,
ensign, tT. S. Navy, at 4 p. m. Wednesday in the Y Lounge will complete the discussions.
Jim Collier is the general administrator for these conferences!.
Robert E. Humphreys, Roy H. Hunt,
and Rcbert M. Spragens form the
Jay Wilson
executive committee.
and Charles Boggs are in charge of
publicity, Wir.frtd Ellis has charge
of arrangements, and James Crowley is personnel manager.
A general vocational conference
for men will be sponsored by the
SGA March
it was announced yesterday. This session will be the
final conference in the Student Government association's program of vocational guidance information.

Style Show To Feature
Student Service Drive
On University Campus

Members of the Lexington Folk
Dance Center will hold a business
meeting at 4 p. m. Saturday at the
Women's gym. Miss Lovain Lewis,
instructors of physical education,
announced.
Subjects to be discussed will include the work of the Country
Dance society and its affiliated cen- ters in the United States, the Moun- tain Folk festival to be held April
at Berea, the future plans of
the Lexington center, and training
in the east and south avail- for
leaders.

Donovan Approves
Fund Drive For

War Prisoners
Fashions from the days of
bicycle costumes, the
rage, the jazz age. and
Charleston
the jitterbug craze will be shown In
a free style show, to be held at 4 p.m.
Thursday in the card room, in connection with the World Student
Service Fund drive which is being
conducted on the campus this week.

1

Ju

folk-dan-

V

--

--

TWO FORMER

Blackout Throws
Men's Dormitories
Into Darkness

UK STUDENTS
DIE IN CRASH
Bullock, Evans
Are Killed When

Transport Falls
The deaths of Lieutenants Harry
Jr., and John R. Evans
Jr. have brought the known list of
former University students losing
their lives in the war to three. The
two aviators crash&l" in an army
transport into the St. Lucie river in
E. Bullock

Florida-Thursda-

blackout
An unintentional
threw the men's dormitories into
darkness for a period of almost
two hours last night. The trouble
which began about 7:45 pjn.,
was believed due to a short circuit in a high tension wire.
Conflicting reports from residents at the dormitories indicated that the men. unable to do
any work, went to sleep; and
that others engaged in shooting
s.
off
One authoritative source in- -'
sisted that bonfires were set in
the halls. An outdoor bonfire,
with accompanying frivolity, was
also reported.

TAYLOR TO HEAD

nt

0,

UK SLATED FOR
SECONDARY CPT

Hanauer Joins

Newspaper Staff

y.

TEACHING GROUP
Classroom Teachers
Assemble March 28
Dr. W. S. Taylor, dean of the education, is local chairman of arrangements for the meeting of classroom
teachers to be held here March 28.
Representatives are expected to
attend from Kentucky, Alabama.
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North
Carolina, South Carolina. Tennes-se- e,
Virginia, West Virginia, Peur'-Rico, and the Virgin Islands.
Besides the University, local spon-st'are the Central Kentucky Eduassociation,
cation
the Fayette
County Teachers association, the
Lexington Teachers club, and the
University chapters of Kappa Pi
and Phi Delta Kappa.
rs

Lincicone To Begin
Work On Parasites
Dr. R. S. Lincicone, the new University professor of parasitology,
soon will begin a survey of parasites
in men and animals of Kentucky. In
his laboratory in the Health building, he will conduct a research of
such parasites as the tapeworm,
roundworm, hookworm, artnropod
and proteozoan.
The survey is a part of his research program in Kentucky, where,
to date, he has found nine types of

parasites
This is Dr. Lincicone's first year
here at the University. In 1937, he
received his B. S. and M. S. degrees
from the University of Illinois, after
which he accepted a position at
Tulane university, where for four
years, he taught clinical parasitology to medical students. Also at Tusals are scheduled every night this lane he received his Ph. D. and
week.
studied under Prof. Ernest Carrol
Students in the cast include Joe Faust, authority on human parasitFamularo as Arthur Miller. Claude ology.
Trapp as David McComber, Grant

Guignol Speeds To Stage fAh Wilderness'
Production Opens

February

16

In Little Theatre
By ANGELA PREIS
Guignol's production of "Ah Wilderness", which opens March 16,
is a tribute to the theatre's techni
cal staff, as a three-scostume
in four weeks is something of
a minor miracle.
Technical Director Clarence Geiger
and Stage Manager Frazier Robards
have built the set of the Miller
parlor using the full stage. The set
designed by Clay Lancaster called
et

for wall paper circa 1900 and the
set got it, but with a vengeance!
The paper is a floral design of pink
and lavender roses on a black background and the hall at the back of
the set is done in blue and white
scroll design.
The other two scenes, the bar and
tne beach, will be enacted on
forms built on either side of the
stage. The actors in these scenes
wiU make their entrances from the
orchestra pit and the acting area
on the platforms will be spotlighted
during the dialogue,
The problem of providing 16 peo
all-ov- er

plat-sho-

w

ple with 28 separate costumes is
being ably managed by Mrs. Anna
on
Freeman.
Guignol costumier
"Ladies in Retirement" and "Old
Acquaintance." "Those 28 costumes."
says Mrs. Freeman," have to in- elude hats, parasols, dusters, petti- coats, slippers, and handbags for
women, and the hats, vests, and
shoes for the men." All costumes
are in the 1900 period.
The cast and Director Frank Fow- ler have been working at an accel- rate too. Before "Old Ac- quathtance" closed "Ah Wilderness"
was already in rehearsal. Rehear- -

Lewis as Wint Selby. Betty Wells
Robets as Belle. Frances Roland as
Nora. James Snyder as the Bar-th- e
tender, and Granville de Roode as
Mr. Jones from New Haven,
Dr. Lawrence Yates of the English
Department, Ray Rand. Catherine
Taylor, Hettie Knight, Jack
ton, Dorothy Pyer Rodes, Wallace
Briggs, and Jean Abel Adams are
also included in the cast.
Bur-trat-

McCord Is Elected
Inter-Fra-

t

President

David McCord, president of Kap- pa Alpha fraternity, was elected
of the
council recentiy.
other officers
chosen were: vice president. Bill
Schick, Triangle; secretary, Harold
Rogers, Lambda Chi Alpha; and
treasurer, Leland Day, D'.lta CM
Inter-fratern-

iy

Sponsored by the YWCA-YMCsocial committee, the show will in- -'
elude a display of Chinese costumes
of men and women students, and
the uniform worn by war prisoners.
Skits of other fashion periods will
be shown and appropriate music
will be played. Toni Stabile has
written the skits, and Wanda Austin
is directing them.
MODELS FOR SHOW
Women to model for the show
are Tansy Barnhill. Miriam Cutler,
and Marion Johnson. Boyd Hall;
Alpha Gamma
Virginia Walker
Delta; Patsy Horkan, Alpha Delta
Pi; Julia Jonnson. Delta Delta Delta;
Mary Beale Mylor. Chi Omega; Harriet Hord. Alice Wooton, and Mary
Frank Wiley. Jewell hall; Wynette
White. Jean Phipps, and Mary C.
Morehead. Patterson hall; Geneva
House, Alpha Xi Delta: Lillian Mitchell, Kappa Delta; Mildred Coleman, Zeta Tau Alpha; and Helen
Culton and Evelyn Cox. Shelby
house.
Continuing the activities of the
"We've Got
WSSF
Committee.
Shoes." a skit written and directed
by students, will be the joint
proirram at 7 o'clock tonight
in the ballroom, to wtveh a'l students have been invited.
The skit will consist of dramatized
news flashes frcm the war torn
countries, from a prison camp, from
Chinese students, and from a battle
scene. Amos Sturgeon, director, said
yesterday.
Students who will have parts in
the play are Glenn Clark. Martha
Snapp, Anne Kirtley. Betty Aldrich,
Eugene Fox. Dorothy Jack Ecklar.
Ann Irvine, Margaret Hatcher. Beth
Caddy, Robert Bookbinder. Annie
Laurie Riley, and Robert Clark.
DONOVAN APPROVES DRIVE
President H. L. Donovan voiced
his approval of the drive in a statement issued to The Kernel yester
day. His statment follows:
"I am in thorough sympathy with
the movement to raise funds for
the relief of war prisoners. It is a
good cause to which we all should
make some contribution."
War prisoners ar.d Chinese students will benefit from the funds
raised by students and faculty
opened
members. The campaign
yesterday and by noon $115 had been
raised. Miss Lida Belle Howe, executive chairman, announced yesterday.
The campaign is being conducted
in the different campus living groups.
A quota of one-ha- lf
the membership
of each organization has been set
up. McDowell house, having 22 residents, had already reached its quota
of $11 yesterday noon. Margie Smith,
house captain, reported. The sophomore women of Boyd hall, the captain of which is Helen Hooe. already
have contributed $40.
The drive for $1200. the goal set
for this campus in connection with
a nation-wid- e
drive for funds, will
continue through Saturday. Miss
Howe said.
A

ca

HARRY BILLOCK
they died in the wreckage of an arjny transport plane. Roth
formerly attended the University.
JOHN EVANS

night.
The bodies of the two fliers have
bean recovered, according to an official announcement from Wright
Field, Dayton, Ohio.
Lieutenant Bullock was a graduate
of the University college of Engineering, and before his enlistment
was
of the Kentucky
Jewell Coal Company, of which his
father is president. He was married
three months ago to Dorothy Ann
Young of Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
Bullock served as executive officer of the ROTC regiment, and
fcas second in command of Pershing Rifle championship drill unit
while he was at the University. He
graduated in June, 1937.
Lieutenant Evans attended the
University for three years and was
Major John Brannan University a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. His siuvlvors include his wife,
CPT
announced yesterday that he had received infor- the former Dorothy Hillenmeye of
mation from the CPT regional in- - Lexington, a University graduate in
old
spector at Columbus, Ohio, that the 1940, and their
University has been recommended daughter, Ann Gordon.
Ted Meyer, who was killed in the
for the secondary CPT course.
crash of the destroyer Pollux, was
A survey is now being conducted
of University equipment and in- listed as the first Univerity war
structors to determine if the neces- death.
sary facilities here meet CPT requirements for the course.
Applications are not being received at this time. Students will be
informed by Major Brannon, if the
A defense course for training
plan is accepted.
junior inspectors of ordnance materials began yesterday in the engineering college, with staff members as instructors.
The 35 enrollees will have 12
Pat Hanauer, Fort Thomas, who weeks of instruction with classes
was managing editor of the Kernel every week-dalast semester, has been appointed
A second course will start MonGeorgetown news correspondent for day. April 20. Prof. D. V. Terell,
The Lexington Herald-Leade- r,
University
in defense
While at the University, Miss Han-9-1- 1 engineering training, reported. Men
auer was a member of the Un'.on between the ages of 18 and 55 who
board and of Theta Sigma Phi,
wish to take part in the course are
men's national journalism friter-abl- e requested to get further details
nity.
from their postmasters.
es

TO RAISE $1200

1

.

Course Begins For
Defense Inspectors

Folk Dance Center
To Meet Saturday

11

j

ALLISON CALLED
TO CAMP POLK
Lieut. Leslie Allison, instructor of
sophomore military clasf.es, has been
notified that he is to be transferred
to troop duty at Camp Polk. Louisiana, on April 1. Allison will be replaced by First Lieut. Berwyn L. Miller whose orders w ill be issued soon
by the War Department.
Allion was recently commissioned
a second lieutenant in the regular
with a temporary first lieu- tenant's commission. He is a
uate of the University and a mem- ""
Announcement
of the transfer
came only three days after Allison's
marriage to Miss
Jane Sqle
grad-preside- nt

r

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFICIAL

rumjpnvu

inn wrmr

UV1PT HOUDATS OR

NEWSPAPER

OF THE UNIVERSITY

xhtriho thb school

nn. Auurw,

tiab

PERIODS

EXAMINATION

Bnwre .t th. Post OITK .t Leilncum. Kentucky
Moud dw m.lltr under the Act ol March I, U7.
yinnHUR
Kentucky Interco. let late PrM AnoclMtra
Lexinfftoa Board of Comnero

"

w

Jim

FAitn
t.UlllT

WooLDRIDGE

BOB ADAIR

society Editor

DAN SHINDLEBOWER.

m

Advertising Manager
Assistant Managing Editor

PAT SNIDER

a slow,

is

burning canter

xvlikli

BETTY PUOH

square ileal when the war
need great numbers ol young
lieve in freedom and decent
nations the kind of Chinese
improvised relugee colleges

;

with steady progress across the mind,
leaving in iis H ail disillusionment, cynicism,
is trcefing ujjoii thousands
and impotence.
of tullrge students in war and refugee lamps in
Europe.
Hunger, told, and insecurity ranUIing in the
back of i lie bead and sapping the attention,
devil alit amoiic xvlio is trying to gel an education. Thex air ufjettitig thousands of (ollege
students in beleagured China today.
For anvone who lias concern for the future of
the world alter World War II and who wants
somehow to prevent the appearance of World
Wars III or IV. there is plenty to be apprehensive- about.
11 v
this time, collegt students escciall
should be await- - that a gieat deal ol the reconstruction of Ktirope and Asia, much of the building up ol a salt status for the future, will depend on the men and women now in colleges
and universities. It is from this trained group
that the leaders of lu")0 and GO and '70 will
come, and in it lies the hope ol making the
"L'niletl Nations"
and
a reality. Europe will be needing not the German youth
in Nai principles, or
with a
graduates of Mussolini's "Sons ol the Woll."
Europe will need the young Cechs and Poles
and Frenchmen now cooped up in relugee
camp: Euhkj will ne'evd the German college
prolcssors and their students now penned up in
war prisons, tiding to keep alive a spark ol dec

tiet

long-hcralde-

long-awaite-

admittatu

over they will
Chinese who bedealings between
now gathered in
iu the heart of
is

China.
Fhe picture of these students mentally rotting
aw ax in Euiojk- - or faced with almost insurmountable problems in China should be enough
to make thinking Americans sit up and take
notice. Someone is going to have to see that they
get assistance, and there could be no belter
"someone" than American college students.
In addition to the aid they will get from the
books, supplies, recreational
facilities, food,
students
clothing and shelter, these
will gel the atlded consolation of knowing that
Ameiiian students are behind them and that
thev can count on their contemporaries now,
and later.
Fhe x)int ol which is that the seivices pro- ided by the World Student Service Fund, working exilusivelv with students and professors in
war prisons, relugee camps, and in Chinese shoe-bouniversities, are clearly among the' most
v aluable
both for now and for the future
w hich American students are called upon to sup-rt- .

thought.
China, alreatlv xor and becoming poorer,
her industrial areas under Japanese domination and her IihkI supplies cut drastically, will
military
need more than apanese-liaineto straighten her out.
If the Allied nations ever intend to "ivc- China
p'-cl-

s

L'uiversilv of Kentucky students, who have
not been approached for individual contributions to anv campaign this year aiid who to
dale have taken praiiitallv no part at all in any
major diive connetted with the war. should see
the wide implications in the WSSF drive on the
campus this week.
'I "here's an imjortant job to be done; theie's
an organisation alreadv V l up to do it. All it
needs now is the money, which can best come
Irom students in American universities. Thk.
kiK.Ntt. strongly urges every University of Ken-tu- t
kv student to contribute.

Never A Shortage Of Fatheads
I

luce pledges ol Phi kappa Nu,

a strcial

l

The Jillei
hat to do. what to do. what to do now
Get in the aniix and ii so, just bow-Ge- l
in ihe iiaw 01 lly in the air
Swim 01 the Coast Guard ami how will von
l.ue
bat to do. what to tlo. what to tlo r
Franklv Fin woiiied. I'm veiv much vexed.
W

ut-s.t-

but miicIv I'm going stark mad.
and leeling bad.
Anxious and
Should I join 7 01 VK or .
While going to (ollege and having a tiuie.--I
he wa things ale going it's the tlevil to sa
jusi a week Irom
Where lh bell we vcill
Mow lv

lodaN

!

Keiiic iiilx-- Peal I Haiboi. the patiiols roai.
regidoi
Renieinlx i Wake Island, and
Ii ain't verv haul.
I li v to 11 m nilx-that ilie aps should he h allien il and
li s a
led.
lai
W ill die it 101 v .oiive willi llie wave ol .1 wand
,nid buv me a Ixmd- II I siudv s ..1 n v

(i

i

.

v

i

hit l

I'fn

11

In u

Ycl, when the ollege publication at Marshall
gathered student comments 011 ihe incident, the
1

at Marshall college, were picked up two
weeks ago 011 the stieels ol downtoxvn Huntington, W. Va.. completely naked.
It was a "hell night stunt" they explained. It
was a ei loi maiite to instill them with fraternity
spil it.
In the luior that followed, the pledges and
sexeial actives were thrown in jail and later
susx.-ntletliom sthool. and the resulting bad
publititx si tick a blow 10 the reputation ol the
American college liateiiiity system xvliith will
be a long time mending.
It is tiiiks like that which lead univcrsilv
administrations to outlaw informal inilialoiis
eiitirclx (as happened at Vanderbili this ytai)
or state legislatures to draw up legislation
lunds to any university tolerating sin h
practices ( as hapeiied in California last ye:u ).
It is tiiiks like that which, called to the attention ol (otenlial Iraternity members, cause
them to think more than twice bcfoie putting
on a pledge button.
We don't see bow anyone with enough sense
to pass a college entrance examination could
denv that this was lai beyond the bounds ol
any'"initiation" i mended to "discipline pledges."
"gixe them haicrnilv spirit." or "make them
mole like brothers" the usual rat ionaliat ions
ottered.

11 11

lollowing were among those made:
Burl Anderson, last year's student president,
now W. Va. recruiting othcer lor the U. S. Marines: "I think it was all in the spirit of fun. In
lac 1. I think they'll make good marines they
have the 'cspiriw tie coips'."
Dick Blake. Huntington junior, "It's silly as
Ii
10 make such a luss. They've been doing it
lor xcais."

Catherine MiCuirc. Huntington junior, "I
think it's funny. I tan just see those boys. darling
through alleys cairying the lids of garbage cans."
Jeaimette Moore, Huntington junior, "Fhe
Irovs got a dirty ileal. There shouldn't haxe been
anv publicity."
Alma Uhlig. Pitisheld. Mass.. senior. "It at

'

Navy To Take 80,000 Men

For

V-- I

Officers Training

KEEPING UP WITH THE
Joseph W. Barker of the Navy Department has announced a plan

whereby every accredited institution of higher learning could parti,
pate in navy trair.ing with a non- program
militarized
Barker former dean of the Co
lumbla University Engineering
School, is special assistant to the
assistant secretary of the navy. He
described this plan in an address to
the Institute of Militarv Studies:
The school year 1942-4- 3 will mark
The navy wUl accept voluntary en- - an accelerating shortage m instruc.
listment as apprentice stamen of
ln aU branches of education.
rot more than 80.000 men a year This will no doubt lower the educs- between the ages of 17 to 19 in- - tional standards, the office says.
elusive, who will contii.ue In col.
EYE. TEETH STANDARDS
lege at their own expense, taking
TO BE MORE LAX
raval training on an About 70 percent of all selective
inactive status for two years aca- service registrants classified so far
have been deferred, but that per- demic years.
con- centage
to
Upon the successful completion of idrtprohiv is expected r,t drop
the. ormv's
us a rpsnii
.
.
.
.
.
2n tioo of rhpsp men
thfsf
recent relaxation ol standards ror
will be ordered to flight training
and eyes.
each year to fill the navy's need.
The selective sevice directors have
These men must be able to pass the made it plain that the labor supply
comprehensive
examination 0I worijers, such as farmers, should
and be physically fit for aviation.
ot
depleted by the draft. Th?it
Those who meet these require- - is a threatened shortage in farm
mente are enlisted In the naval re- - labor because so many farm bo-:- , are
I,
serve, Class
as 'seamen second reluctant to seek deferment lest they
class. They are to follow a special be considered unpatriotic, officials
Euggested curricula which stresses report.
physical training, mathematics and
physics.

inimn

YOU CANT ESCAPE THE

Shipley Has Top
Scholastic Rating

In College Of Law
To the Editor of The Kernel:
There appeared in your
of the Week" column and numerous
flowery stories on Roy Vance a gross
inaccuracy as to his standing in the
law school. Mr. Vance is not the
first nor the second ranking senior,
One student. Charles V. Shipley, has
a