xt7z8w381r5r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z8w381r5r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19421016  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 16, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 16, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7z8w381r5r section xt7z8w381r5r Best uopy Avanaoie

The Kentucicy Kernel

ON PAGE TWO
Come To The Dance
To Kick The Jap

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY,

Z246

US GOVERNMENT

Frosh Story No.

TO MAKE LOANS

Patience

FRIDAY, OCTOBER

For Expenses
"The Student War loan Is ready
to go into operation," T. T. Jones.
dean of men. announced today.
Both men and women who are
taking either engineering or chemistry and are within eight quarters
of graduation are eligible. Loans
will be made for tuition, supplies,
and maintenance up to $25 per
month. The loans are made by the
treasury of the United States government through the Student Loan
committee of the University.
Any eligible student who Is now
devoting a large portion of his time
to work rather than to his college
work should apply, Dean Jones

Motfitt And Caboose 'Boys

Signed. For Firs I Formal
induce ouicuuicu

Seniors Must File
For All Degrees

For Homecoming
On October 24

who expect to comrequirements for graduation
at the close of the fall, winter,
spring, or summer quarter, should
make application for degrees on
Monday or Tuesday of next week
AU

Deke Moffitt and his "Music for
Your Moods" orchestra, featuring
"Sweet Georgia Brown" and Bill
DeMayo. vocalists, and the Little
Red Caboose Boys, will play for the
first formal of the year, the Homecoming dance. Saturday, October

seniors

Lan-dru-

WOOTEN CHOSEN

plete

buildin room 16, Administration
ing, Leo M. Chamberlain, dean of
the University, has announced.
Graduate students who expect to
complete requirements for graduate degrees should also report. As
the commencement lists are made
from these applications.
Dean
Chamberlain stressed the importance of filing applications at this
time.

24.

Moffitt is the composer of the
popular
number
"The Indians
Threw Rocks at Columbus," which
was recorded by Abe Lyman and his
orchestra. He - also wrote "Little
Red Caboose" while he was playing
at the Glen Rendezvous, Cincin-

--

nati.
Versatility
's
Versatility is the feature of
band: his idea, simply put. is
to compound all the elements of
entertainment into one balanced orMof-fitt-

Students Needed
For Nursing Class

ganisation.
The University Home Nursing
Each man in the company is a
finger as well as an instrumental- class enrollment has not yet been
ist, and the band features many completed and class work cannot
novelty numbers as well as swing begin until more women have signtunes, waltzes, rumbas, congas, and ed up, Mrs. Sarah B. Holmes, dean
of women, said yesterday.
She
e mi --classical selections.
Moffitt and his orchestra are stressed the fact that this Red
known throughout the East, South, Cross course is important war
having played in work, and asked women interested
and
in enrolling to come to her office
iKHels and night clubs such as Beverly Hills. Newport, and Glen Ren- immediately for information.
dezvous, Cincinnati.
Mortar Board, senior women's
Advance sale of tickets will open honorary, has furnished a room in
at the Union information desk to- the Home Economics building
Mid-We-

day. Admission will be 85 cents,
couple or stag, advance, or one dollar at the door.

where meetings will be held on
Tuesday and Thursday evenings
from 7 to 9 o'clock.

JEWELL HEAD
Council Given

More Power
Wootton, graduate student
from Hazard, has been elected president of Jewell hall.
Other officers of the dormitory
are Bea Conley,
Martha Booher, secretary; and
Harriet Hord, social chairman.
who
representatives,
Corridor
form the governing council of the
hall, were also chosen. They are
Carolyn Gable, Bernice Salutsky,
Bette Robinson, Helen Wilson. Betty Ann Poindexter, Norma Dury,
Virginia Skidmore, Margaret Graham, and Mary Cary.
More power is being vested In the
council this year than at previous
periods. The making and enforcing of regulations for the residents
will be the sole responsibility of this
group. In former years the night
supervisors and the head resident
of the hall have shared this responsibility, but this year It rests
entirely upon the students.
Elections in Patterson and Boyd
halls will be conducted later after
the girls, many of whom are new
students, have had ample opportunity to become acquainted with
the capabilities of the various residents.
Alice

y,

secretary-t-

I)

Former Students

the

sea-so- n

(

open-

er. V. P. I. followers like to recall
the "32 fracas, when the Gobblers,
figured as just another step in the
path of Kentucky's unbeaten loop- leaders, upset the 'Cats.
BIG BLl'E PRACTIC ES
That the Big Blue isn't taking
Tech's challenge lightly this year
lias been very evident in practice
sessions this week. Lengthy drills
on Gobbler plays, blocking and
pass defense have been a daily proAb
gram
Kirwan's
for Coach
charges.
Reports from V. P. I. starts so
far indicate a tricky attack in store
for the visitors The Gobblers' lat- 0
est outing was a successful
meeting with Davidson. Kentucky
by a Vanderbilt
was nosed.
team that looms as the Southeastern winner. The Kentuckians employ straight power foothpll for the
0.

16--

6,

most part, but frequently take to
the aerial lanes for advances.
KENTLCKY FAVORED
Kentucky will enter the game as
the favorite, but this edge might be
shortened if two injured starters
are unable to play. Charlie Eblen.
nH
fiillhH'.k.
anri Roh Herhert
tjQth were put on tne casuaUy list
in last week's tilt with the Commodores. Eblen suffered a chipped
right ankle.' and Herbert received
an injury to his left shoulder. Both
are considered as doubtful starters.
tackle,
Clyde Johnson.
sustained a sprained ankle, but will
be ready to go tomorrow. Two other 'Cats are still out of action with
injuries received earlier.
Gene
Meeks. flashy scatback. is recovering fioin a kidney contusion, and
Randall Hammer, halfback, has a
broken shoulder.
CATS PASS
Kentucky's passing attack is expected to pick up yards aplenty
against the boys from the Old Dominion. Last Saturday's fray saw
Phil Cutchin and lanky Carl Alt- haus form a combination that carried the Big Blue to the shadows
of the Vandy goal before a penalty
erased hopes of overcoming the
Commodore margin. Cutchin's versatility was shown when he switched from the role of passer to catch- ier. Jesse Tunstill. soph back, is al
so regarded as a competent heaver,
and Charlie Kuhn, junior half, can
toss 'em.
The Kentucky gridders will work
out on the Gobbler gridiron this
fiftc! noon in Roptioke. They left

J

Kampus
Kernels
BAPTIST STl'DKNT I'NION .

students are Invited and

was appointed

women have joined
University
the ranks of other American women
now serving on many battlefronts,
at home and "over there."
In the Women's Army Auxiliary
Corps, which trains women to take
over strategic positions so that
more men may go to the front
lines, are several former students.
Helen Horlacher, class of '41. has
been graduated from officer's canFreshmen representatives to the
didate school and has received her legislature of the Student Governcommission In the United States ment association will be elected
Army.
between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. today
Marcia Randall, also of the class in Memorial hall. All freshmen
of '41 and a member of Delta Delta students should be present and
Delta sorority, has recently been should vote.
accepted in the WAAC and will
receiving
official
Candidates
leave soon for officer's school.
backing of the campus political
Lucy Berry, former house- parties have been announced. Bet- Mrs.
mother of McDowell house, left ty Lee Birk and Jerome F. Eastham
September 7 for Fort Des Moines, are being advocated by the IndeIowa, headquarters of the group
pendents.
Mary Brewster Phelps
Lee and Jean Overstreet, Lexingand Bill J.. Johnstone are the Conton, University graduates and mem- stitutionalist candidates.
bers of Kappa Delta sorority, also
All ballots cast in this election
left this fall for officer's school.
will be kept until the end of the
Virginia Eversole, London, Ky.. current school year, the election
member of the class of '40 and of board has revealed.
Delta Delta Delta sorority, was ac- Student members nf the pWlinn
cepted as a member of the WAAC vommiUee win serve as counters,
in September and Is now In FortjTne full
6 will meet at
Des Moines for training.
8 30 Saturday morning and will ex- amine the count and announce the
a
candidates elected.
trrt

Lexington early Thursday morning,
arrived in Roanoke late Thursday
night. The entourage, whieh in- eludes 33 footballers, will leave
immediately
Roanoke
after the
game, arriving in Lexington early
Sunday morning.

will hold a general meeting
SUB at 7:30 tonight. All

Thompson

chairman from the . Independents
' for the All Campus Sing which will
Notices of UK men serving in the be held before the Christmas holiarmed forces must now vie for in- days. Bob Lewis, Bardstown, arts
terest with press releases concernand sciences sophomore, was aping women students in the services. pointed to assist him.

..

at the
Baptist
refresh-

ments will be served.
STl'DENT I'NION BOARD . . .
will meet at 5:30 Monday In room
23 of the Union building.
NYA WOMEN . . .

at 3 p.m. Friday in
. . will meet
Room 111. McVey hall, Mrs. Sarah
B. Holmes, dean of women, has announced. This is a very Important
meeting.

.

ELECTION HELD
FOR FRESHMEN
Political Parties
Back Candidates

i

--

rii

iryouis

freshmen
coming members
Pershing Rifles,
Buell armory at
October 19.
All

interested in

lune.

artin

Sign With WAAC's

By BAXTER MELTON
7--

fioide

ARMED FORCES

KeuUicky 'Cats In Old Virginny
To Talk Turkey With Gobblers
Kernel Sports Writer
Tmice victim of 6 defeats by the
rountry's top elevens, and wiiuier of
two other starts, the Wildcats will
make a second try for their third
victory Saturday in Roanoke, Va,
against Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Billed as tle Gobblers' tough- est foe of the year, the Cats will
take part in the first major game
ever played in Tech's new $300,000
prid edifice.
Saturday's clash will be the fifth
between the two schools. Kentucky
has won two. last one, and tied one
in the series which started in 1926.
Probably most fans are familiar
with last year's contest, when the
Kentuckians ran over the

Delts Donate
1,450 Pounds
To Lead Race

Approximately three hundred Independents attended the first regular meeting of the Independent
party held in Memorial hall Tuesday evening.
Albert Cross, Morning View, agriculture senior, was elected president of the party. The other officers elected were Jim Hurt, Hard-burlarts and sciences sophomore, vice president; Jack Swift.
Lexington, commerce senior,
reasurer;
and Harry Caudill,
Whitesburg, agriculture sophomore,
political chairman.
The Independents Will support
Jerry Eastham, Hazard, and Betty
Lee Birk. New Albany, Ind:, for
representatives to the
freshmen
JHIIIIJiiiJJWJ.1.11.
j. ...i. ,
Student Government
association
legislature.
THEY'LL PLAY FOR SCRAP DANCE . . .
"It was the best turnout of the
the music tomorrow
Dee .4kers and his " k's" will
party in a long time," said Jim
party night for the lnterirnteinit-sfinsmeiHurt, vice president, "and the
l
Sera ft
as a whole seems very enthusiastic-M-

UK WOMEN JOIN

be-

of Company C-will report to the
5 o'clock. Monday,
3,

Scrap Number

1256

L. P. WITT

Captain

Scrap Bulletins
The University scrap heap is
growing.
And so is the heap of stories about
the drive which have piled up
around the Kernel office.
Therefore we hereby open this
editorial scrap pile and heave into
it latest communiques
from the
pickup front.

was decided that they would be of
more value as scrap metal than ar
Junk moved from corner to corner
of the Union.

Ever See A Climbing Lish?
Read About It, Save $10,000
By CLAIDINE MlLLINAl'X
A climbing fish, a $10,000 bet, and
a visit to Lexington by Carveth

Wells account for an unusual signature recently discovered in the
old guest book of the University
Faculty club.
The signature, consisting of a
name accompanied by an elaborate
picture of a palm tree with a fish
clinging to the trunk, was placed
there by Carveth Wells, authority
on international affairs, when he
was the luncheon guest of Prof. L.
L. Dantzler, head of the English
department, about eight years ago.
It was brought to light 'during
Wells' visit to Lexington Thursday
under the auspices of the Executives' club.
Dantzler explained the name and
its accompanying illustration by relating the following story;...
The Story, At Last
Some years ago. Wells wrote a
book entitled "Six Years in the
Malay Jungle." Therein he told of
seeing a jungle fish swim to shore,
hobble across the sand, and climb
a palm tree. "Big Bill" Thompson,
who was mayor of Chicago, refused
to believe that such a thing was
possible. He was so certain of his
xmvictions that he offered to give
Wells $10,000 if the story could be
verified.
Malay Bound
The only way to determine the
ruth of the tale was to go to the
Malay jungle and see if this versatile fish could be located. "Big
Bill" chartered a ship and sailed
for the Malay country. Thompson
and his companions did see the accomplished fish, so Thompson was
considerably poorer because of the
doubting streak in his nature.
This tale was related to Dantzler
by Wells on that day eight years
ago when they lunched together at
the Faculty club. When he was
asked to sign the guest book, he
placed after his name a drawing of
the fish that had brought him such
good fortune.

SCRAP DANCE . . .
room
. . . will be held in Bluegrass
of Student Union from 9 to 12
Saturday night. Bring 5 pounds of
junk for you and your date for
rl mission.

AH students interested in becoming members of the business
staff of the 1943 Kentuckian.
should meet at 3 o'clock this afternoon in room 53. McVey hall,
it was announced by Joe Boh-nabusiness manager.

k.

This is the last day on which
individual photographs can be
made for the yearbook, Bohnak
stressed. All students who have
not as yet reported to Memorial hall for pictures should
do so today.

Red Cross Calls
Bandage Makers
University women students interested n making surgical dressings
for the local Red Cross chapter are
requested to report to the dean of
women's office to state the time at
which they wish to work.
Mrs. A. B. Kirwan will conduct a
training class before the next consignment of materials arrives so
that the women may be prepared
to help fill the quota set by the
Red Cross, it was announced. The
dressings are to be made at the local YWCA. on Mondays through
Fridays, from 9 to 1 p.m.. and from
1
to 4 p.m. All women enrolling
are asked to serve at least three
hours at a time.

Block And Bridle
Gives Ag Dance

Donovans To Give
Homecoming Tea

;

im

?

gal-Ion-

(,',;''

-

fr

ten-pou-

The Scrap Dance, highlight of
drive, will he
to 12 Satarday
held from
night In the Bluegrass room of
the I'nion buRding. wider the
saspiers of the Inlerfraternity
Council.
will
Dec Akers and his "K'
provide the magic for the dance
and decorations will be carried
out in a patriotic theme.
Admission to the dance will
be live poands of scrap for stag
or couple. The scrap Is I be
exchanged for dance bid at
the door of the I'nion building.
Arrangements for the affair
are being made by the varieas
fraternities, ander the direction
of Jack MeNeaL president.

Business Staff

j

linYliinl

.

the Vniversily

'Any unusual articles among the
dance, sponsor-- j
An
75 pounds from Neville hall?" que
ed by Block and Bridle, animal
ried the Kernel scrap reporter.
husbandry honorary, will be held
'Well, we turned in a baby car
at 7:30 o'clock Friday night in the
riage. Prof. Edward Newbury, of
Stock Judging pavilion. All agricul- -,
Oddest assortment of articles the psychology department replied.
ture freshmen are especially invit- -,
picked up on University Scrap day
"A baby carriage?" the journalist
President and Mrs. Herman L. ed. Music will be provided "by a
came from the women's residence gasped. "How did that ever get in
Donovan will entertain Saturday nickelodeon. Admission will be 25
halls.
Neville hall?"
afternoon. October 24. after the cents.
Two coffee urns, which were used
"You'll have to ask Dr. White Kentucky-Alabam- a
game, with a
All agriculture
students in the
in feeding soldiers camped on Stoll about
that." came the answer.
tea at Maxwell place.
animal husbandry field who have
field during the last war, were
This annual Homecoming lea af- completed four quarters of college
again put into service in the war
Mrs. Margaret Crutcher tried fords an opportunity for reunion of work and desire to become Block
effort.
enough to take all the scrap former students as well as alumni, and Bridle members, should get
Included in the 2,000 pounds do- hard
faculty, the teams, and their their applications immediately in
nated by the halls were pots and out of the men's dorms. "I canvassedI coaches.
the office of Dean L. J. Horlacher.
pans from a heavy duty mixer for all the rooms," she stated, "but
posts or parking
mashing potatoes and other foods, found no hitching
a large waffle iron, lipstick tubes signs or other articles which usually
boys' rooms."
and compacts, window guards from clutter' up the was not entirely unHer search
Patterson hall which have been re- productive, however; she collected
placed by newer types, candy boxes,
pounds
screens,
window
napkin rings, approximately 100 including of non
some
things
flower pot racks, one old bed used essential
broken irons and coffee pots.
!
Iii
in the old infirmary in Patterson
hall, a chopping machine for grindObsolete sterilizers were pitched
ing hamburger
meat and salad
heap piled out
vegetables, an apple corer. coat into the
hangers, aluminum stew pans, one side the Biological Sciences building.
s,
of which had a capacity of 20
Miscellaneous scrap, with no dismetal picture frames, curtain
rods, window shades, metal lamp tinguishing features, was collected
bases, a gas hotplate, and a mass of from other buildings: 75 pounds
from the Armory. 250 from Frazee
costume jewelry.
Would it be out of place to won hall. 600 from Miller, 400 from
der if there is anything left in the Pence.
Reports from other buildings had
dorms?
not been received at press time.
Old athletic cups were included
!0CO
And so people continue scrapping
in the 200 pounds taken from the
AND THEN CAME THE BLOWTORCHES
Union building. "Pop" Theil stated everything from hair, pins to bar
that these cups had been "knocked rails, from brass buttons to dilapi
mrmliers of Kn"! kajiui t'.iiinmti sit on their feme
around from post to pillar" and dated tractors, from earrings to lot the last
tune
dorw'rutt
wiokuien
were of no value. Two were not even iron fences. We wouldn't be a bit the
si raft drive. I'n lined me t.lrjihelh Crimes ('.hafnium. Site
inscribed, he said. One had been surprised to see one of the Kernel
awarded the University track team office's two typewriters atop the t.wing. I onise Milwnnl. hntlm I n, is, Man- K. S,ott. Sue tun
at a meet in Ohio in 1932 or "33, ac- junk pile at Saturday night's dance C.ooding, l:lizal,eth Lewis. Curohn Mnrsteller. Llhel Roger. .Ilgte
someone was in the office today Ihikson. i.jto- - Hughes, fancl llndes. Ii,ts Hoss. I'.il (ildU.'im.
cording to Theil. They were never
ticket.
a
on display in the building arid It looking

lnne

Total poundage netted during the
first week of the University scrap
drive was 8.510 pounds.
This figure was compounded from
receipts turned in to the Kernel
office by organizations contributing
scrap to the campus campaign.
Several donations, for which receipts have not yet been Hied, are
not included in this total.
Delta, Tau Delta at present leads
the organization competition with
a total of 1.450 pounds of scrap.
Alpha XI Delta Is second with 1.385
Independent donations
pounds.
amount to 3.875 pounds, and the
Kernel has accumulated 1.800
pounds.
Calls have been received from
other independent groups and from
Kappa Delta, Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
and Alpha Xi Delta for further donations.
The American Red Cross has received the largest number of votes,
with a total of 491. Student War
Fund is a close second with 359.
The organization which receives
the highest number of votes will be
given the entire proceeds of the
drive. Each campus group contributing scrap is entitled to one
vote for every ten pounds donated.

Kentuckian Calls

Iilanajr

LAMP AND CROSS . . .
at 5 p.m. today in
. . . will meet
Room 204 of the Union building.

7

Scrap Pile Reaches Four Tons
As Campus Drive Continues

For Legislature

stated.
Each student applying for a loan
will be required to- fill out a questionnaire which will give information about his financial condition.
Students interested in applying
should report to the office of the
dean of men. After discussing the
loans with Dean Jones, the students
DEKE MOFFITT . . .
are to meet the loan committee at
3 p. m. Monday in Jones' office.
. . . if suxofihone, and his orchestra, featuring "Sweet Ceorgta
The Student War loan is a new
lirown," Hill UeMayo. anil the Little Red Caboose Boys, will type loan designed by the federal
fday for the Homecoming formal.
government to help students taking
courses that are valuable to the war
effort to graduate as speedily as
possible.
The Student Loan committee is
composed of Dr. T. T. Jones, dean
of men, chairman; Mrs. Sarah B.
Holmes, dean of women; Frank D.
Peterson, comptroller of the University; Prances Jinkins, Robert
and Albert Cross, students.

NUMBER

AS PRESIDENT
Eastham, Birk
To Be Supported

ar

Up To $25 Monthly

IJ2

ELECT CROSS

persistence, as
ability, seem
this year's crop of
and

to mark
frosh.
Friday an English professor
to his first-yeannounced
group that because of Mon- day's holiday the class would
not meet again until the following Wednesday.
A meek voice in the back of
the room inquired, "Why aren't
we goir.g to have class Tuesday?"
The surprised prof explained
that the class only met on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and
Friday.
Now. you'll never believe us,
but the freshman had actually
been going to class each Tuesday since school started, sitting
patiently in the McVey hall
room, and wondering why no
one, not even the professor, ever came on Tuesdays.

Treasury To Lend

Hi.

6

well as blundering

TO UK STUDENTS

in

Pistol. Rifle Team .Meet;
Aj? Students Get Scholarships

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

VOLUME XXXIV.

37-1- 4.

ON PAGE FOUR

The- - campus, drive will continue
through October 27. and it is hoped
that all organizations will contribute in an effort to give the University the largest poundage per
capita enrollment of any school or
college in the state. Should this
goal be reached, a prize of $250.
being offered by the state, would be
added to the proceeds of the drive
to be donated to charity.
A trophy will be awarded by the
Kernel to the campus organization
having the largest poundage per
j capita enrollment.
Individual prizes
of $100 each are also being offered
by the state to the Kentucky girls'
and boys' organization having the
largest poundage per capita enrollment, and to the Kentucky Individual having the largest poundage.
Organizations wishing to contribute scrap should call the Kernel office to report.
Maintenance ami
operations trucks will pick up the
scrap, weigh it. and deliver It to
the downtown depot, where each
group will be credited Individually
for all donations.
j

US's UKs
LIEl'T. W. H- - MAXEDON, '42, now
on leave from Camp Wheeler. Ga .
is visiting on the campus.
After
being graduated from the University. Maxedon took special courses
at the Ft. Benning infantry school,
and was appointed an instructor at
Camp Wheeler. While in school, he
was lieutenant - colonel in the
ROTC. commander of the Confederate Squad, an officer of Pershing
Rifles, and a member of Scabbard
and Blade.
SECOND Lit IT. LESTER M.
GROSS, Frankfort, class of '40. was
graduated
from the Victorville
Army flying school as a bombardier
last Saturday. v
TOM KELLY FARRIS. '41. has bent
sworn into the Navy's Class
for Naval aviation cadets in New
Orleans. La. Farris is now head
Medical Technician at the Charity
hospital in New Orleans, and will
continue working there until he is
railed into training.
WILLIAM BALDEN. Harrodsburg.
VOL.
GARDNER. Somerset, ami
J.AMES
J. BICKLEY. Maysville.
are at the Naval Air Station.
Fla.. for flight trainins
Balden studied at the University
for two years. Buckley three, and
Gardner, who was a regular on the
varsity basketball team, received
his B. S. degree. These three will
be commissioned as ensigns in the
Naval reserve or second lieutenants
in the Marine Corps reserve.
IN ANSWER TO numerous requests we are today publishing the
address of
Lt. Harold Winn
Company B. 5th Battalion
Ca!?p WtjeW'V. G"g?a
V-- S

Peiw-sacol-

.

* oesi uopy Avanaoie

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steinfort

N. V.

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upimtum

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iiHffl
tl1 the

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t.OttOYS

tHtnIHi

lifltlRMW

Well, Here

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Dance For Uncle Sam
1 oinorrow nielli is I Ik- Soap Dante, sousoce-l, i lie Inicifraicrniiy council. W't- - hope- - thai, in
-

for ltinging in strap, vou lil not
id n.hc out those III ounds for voitr him!
votii dale's admission to he dance.
I he kernel wants to thank the count il
or
ion in the scrap drive. Iv
Hs splendid toojK-rasijonsoring this dance, seeing ilia) the li(ls were
invited, and the cMehcs-tipliiilcd, the thaK-ionis excellent to know thai a group
aid. It
oil the campus is taking such an interest and
that they are doing such a line
The telephone rang all day Mondav, hut si ill
there were organizations. Iraierniiies, and soior-iiiewhich did not notify us of scrap to Ik: collected by maintenance and operations trucks.
Our heartiest congratulations to the four Ikivs
truck and went out
vim hired a
scrap all on tlicir own. Thcv tame hack
villi alxHit S.47 ounds of metal. That is
lor-ge- i

oiir

I

t

s

a

jl.

s

gath-eiiu-

g

what we consider using a scrap holiday to its
l
advantage, instead of siiciiding the clay
sleeping.
so interesied
One l.cxington cilicn

U-s-

e

-

at all. Charlie liarnaril caiighl sciap gaihcicis
n.iking oil wild his car two limes dining ihe
Monday climax and ihcy wcic not chiving il

in the kernel chive that she asked lhal ihe
scrap Ironi her home Ik- - turned in to the credit
of I he kernel. Il made a tidy pile when il was
all collected.
One of lie surprising things about scrap metal
is lhat il seems to weigh out of all protonion lo
ils sie. Pieces lhal look as though they should
weigh L1I xmiuK will weigh HKI
unds. Willi
the men and women tan renientlxT
thai in v
thai the scrap for it- dance will not he large
enough to cause inconvenience in tarrying.
And don't forget girls, we promised lhat vou
all would help tarry the strap. And if vou want
to go to the dance real badly (and we imagine
you like lo dance) vou might hint to the handsome fe llow who sits next to vou in psychology
trass that you have a piece of scrap iron that
weighs just 1(1 J hi i u Is. Anv one tan lake a hint
like that.
The I'niversity is shooting for some of the
big prizes thai are Iking offered, and for the
2'.(HH)-ounmaik, so every bit of metal counts.
There is no piece too small for the purgtose. So
'
bring it in.

either.

lhal lillle bundle of pulchritude which did

-

1

Out Of This World

TICKLERS

d

t

tlep.n tiiienl of ihe I'liiversity
uiaiiages to gel at le ast tliice loin ills ol a
lime-- .
Wonder what would hapjit u it one
got inlo lime coliises which look lli.it ninth
I imer

Ihe

Knglisli

Adniinistral ive order has curlailed niiiiiU I of
ohii houses for the winter. What are students
cxifclcd lc do now that rubber, gas.
tieii
houses have lieen rationed!-- Such loiesighl we
Mavlie tvervlxMlv will si.oi
have never
weeklv serenades of the 1

is a

Al

l'-

Musical Mutterings
Gardner

-

one-nig- ht

hot-lic- ks

one-nig- ht

set-up- s!

It's
That's What It

ccruistent?
Oh. sure, the fence was put there
to keep some few boys from passing a football or throwing a baseball across the lawn
those boys
who had been told to get off the
toot ball field as it was to be used
for something else. That, however,
is not the question.
Would not
wooden posts have served equally
as well, or, better yet, some of those
small signs inscribed "Please"?
I'm not trying to ridicule, but
merely am attempting to see which
end is up and why.
Sincerely,
J. S.
"I represent the Mountain Sheep
company." began the snappy
salesman. "Would you be interested in some coarse yarns?"
"Gosh, yes.", breathed tlfi- - gul
"Tell nut a ctMlple."

tM cf

be giA that portable laelio

-

tors of love. gord advice, and encouragement.
We know that life, after all. is
something other than a dance step
or a picnic without a return ticket.
. . . There will be somber days for
you men as for us. But those days,
it is not presumptious to say that
perhays we will be stronger than
you who pride yourselves on being
the stronger sex!'. We will forget
our pains, our sorrows, and our
ennui. We. the little girls of today, we will put our little arnw
around your necks with a kiss ai.d
say to you. "Behind the clouds, the
same sun shines alwavs!"

,

slush-pump-

amc

rc--

iwfT

-

Wool

-

I

n--

-

1

'!

-

hand-holdi-

Mc-V- ey

bayfjj (kmc

Ik

w

non-Creek- s

Monday we were excused from
classes in order to aid in the drive
to gather scrap. Everyone was urged and some even forced to bring
in any loose metal available.
Wednesday, right here on the
campus, on the north side of
hall to be exact, a fence with
iron posts strung with barbed wire
was erected! I ask you
is that

ijon't

I

-

I

That Of Which Girls Dream

er

er

"Yf

.

"...

Harbed Wire 'Is No Aid
To Beauty Of Campus
To the Editor of The Kernel:
Today millions of loyal Americans
are tearing down their lawn fences
they feel that this extra
.scrap will terminate the war sooner.
We at the University dont feel
this way however. It is our opinion
lhat fences with barbed wire, which
could and should be turned in for
are put to better use keeping

oinuiv Mooic
just win in
an iinlavtH able lone. Mr. !owt-iall vou know what don't von get oil lie m i ks
ol lit- WiMi.il
ol the individual mt tnU-rhas plavc-two ol I lit- si longest
ball team?
teams in the counliv lo scores ol 7 to l. m i vou
have the utter gall to veil .ilwuit the- v.n llu
did il. We wanted lo see llieni win. too. I t
vou criticised Althaus for tutting the wtong
when two nun had him blocked oil in lit- duet
lion vou
oniiiit ml( l.
Also, vou have liccn siiidctit in vour nni.nU
.iIh.iii public iiv of high school clavs allt cling llir
plav of one ol the most iiuaHecled sophs in
,
MavU- - thcv all aren't at ilieii
bill theie are reasons for this which vou don't
exacllv know all .ilxml. and alter g.iines like
those il doesn't lit the situation to pan .iiinImmIv.
Shut up. llower. Ulore sou sav too ninth.

I

timely hint lo one Alex llower.
It seems that . a certain little First he dates Virginia steady and soil- - of a Lexington paicr. who thinks his
group of fraternities, who evidently then turns to her twin. Helen, who
is so great lhat he tan only give off in
c
can't stand the gaff of good clean he is now squiring around the ritic isni
wholesome sport, are trying to go campus.
Ye eternal triangle crops up.
feminine. These lodges are in favor of changing the fraternity rush Namely ChiO Mary Beale Mylor,
set-u- p
to the nice gentle "sorority" "Minkie" Clark, and Windy Myers.
system. And- we know why! But Place your bets.
:
Phi Delt Jimmy Sparrow and
that would be telling! If it goes
Rrmitlt Uurd mi plays in all the domains, even In
ih.ililin's
through, next Rush Week would Doris Smither should hold a con- llir rxrliaii&r
( iim.i If t.urnhin.
that of love and marriage. By the
) force of things as they
sound something like this . . (lodge ference or something. First, they
are and
l llir slutlrnli
we do
member to prospective pledge . . were court