xt7z8w383h8p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7z8w383h8p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19621004  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  4, 1962 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  4, 1962 1962 2015 true xt7z8w383h8p section xt7z8w383h8p It

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ft 3

Students Reveal Sympathy For Meredith

Seven UK students interviewed tin's week expressed unanimous condemnation of the actions of
llic state of Mississippi.
Mark Armstrong, a sophomore premcd student from
Lexington, condemned the methods of Oovernor Harnett in barring Meredith ;"rom the university.
' "I think that if they had wanted to keep Meredith

out, they should have been more subtle about it and not
tried to challenge the federal government. That issue
was settled in 18G5. We didn't win then and we can't
win now."
Armstrong also added that he felt the Ole Miss
Mudents were wrong in allowing outsiders to influence
them in their thinking.
"Integration is inevitable," added Carol Held, soph- -

omore psychology major from llarrorishurg. "If it hadn't
been Meredith, it would have been someone rlsr."
"I think it's time the South forgot the glory of the
Civil War," was the opinion of Jerry Anderson, a first-yelaw student from Lexington. "It's time such states
as Mississippi and Alabama joined the Union. We thought
we solved this problem in 1832 but apparently we
haven't. We are first Americans and only secondarily
Mississippians or Kentuckians."
Providing a northern point of view on the problem,
Dee Clarkson, freshman library science major from Ashtabula, Ohio, expressed the opinion that Meredith should
remain in the university. "At home we're used to having
Negroes and whites in school together."
Tim Cone, a sophomore prelaw major from Iexins-toagreed Meredith should remain in school and added

he felt Oovernor Harnett should be lemoved from ofiVr?.
Cone said also that" he felt former At my Ma J. (tin. ErUin
A. Walker should be committed.
Linda Perkins, a freshman from Hopkinsville. an!
Eric Hlaesing, a Junior advertising major from South
Fort Mitchell, joined in expressinti disapproval of th?
rioting and demonstrations which greeted Mciedith's attempts
"lie should be admitted," Hlaesing said. "It's a shame
he had to go through what he did. I don't think he particularly wants the education himself," he continued,
"He is a pioneer for his race."
"I don't feel Meredith's presence would make that
much actual difference at Ole Miss." added Miss Perkins.
"People should accept the tact of integration. This all
giw.s a bad propaganda im.mc."

ar

n,

Ole Miss Student
Describes Riots

IT

A University of Mississippi student, Bay Shimrak of Me- Itichen. N.J., save the Kernel ;.ui insight into the Mississippi
crisis yesterday.
state in general, he said, "The
Shimrak said the first signs of
are firmly convinced that Vol.
trouble appeared Sunday after- people
LIV, No. 0
the federal government has overnoon and evening. "The students
its boundaries."
were heckling the federal mar- stepped are convinced
also, that
They
shals, but it was just on a small the U.S.
Supreme Court didn't inscale. Most of the people were
terpret this law, but rather made it.
just out for some fun."
Shimrak said that the people of
He said the mob really began to
Mississippi definitely are more anpet out of control after a news gry over federal Intervention than
photographer said something to the the integration matter itself, diveffect of, "Why don't you people do ing his own viewpoint, Shimrak
some demonstrating, so I can get a admitted that total integration

1

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LEXINGTON, KV., THURSDAY. OCT.

M orton Aims

picture."
They took him at his word and
wrecked his automobile.
Federal troops then fired tear
gas into the crowd from a distance of about 20 feet. "It was then
that the people completely lost all
control. Shimrak said. "I saw one
man fire six shots from a pistol in
the general direction of the administration building."
Attempting to explain the feeling
of the people of Oxford and the

is inevitable.

He agreed, however,
with the opinion of the Mississippians that "The federal government has overstepped its boundaries in this case."
He said that it is rather widely
accepted that the Klu Klux Klan
is responsible for the majority of
vicious rioting.
"They brought a pitch of hatred
that wasn't there before, and were
instrumental in bringing on this
small scale war."

Speaking without notes holme 150 persons, Iupuhlieau
Sen. Morton attacked the attempt to concentrate power in
ainl the live
Washington.
spending ideas ol the present
achniiiistraiion in Ins speech .it
the Stud'. i;f I'nion Ballroom
Tuesday evening.

of men. .said, "There will
grace period of two weekends to
allow the students to take their
automobiles home. Those students
now have unregistered cars at
the University are urged to either
take thtm home or to register
them.
Dave Graham, chairman of the
Student Congress Judiciary Hoard,
said, "Repeated violations of stu
dent motor vehicle regulations can
result in suspension from the Uni
versity.
UK retaliations state that all
students registered as freshmen or
sophomores, regardless of how
many years they have attended the
University, are forbidden to pus- -

Dames Club
Will Meet
Dames, the Universi ys wives
club, will have its first meeting
Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the Student Union Building Music lhiuin.
Mary Ellen Solomon, publicity
chairman, urged all interested persons to attend the meeting.
During the year, the Dames
work with handicapped children
ancl
participate in swimming,
bridge, arts and crafts, and current events groups.
When her husband graduates
from the University, the wife receives a Pht (Put your husband
through) degree, conferred by Mrs.
Frank Dickey.

Young Democrats

The Young Democrats Club
will meet at 7 o'clock tonight in
Koom 128 of the Student Union
Huilding. Mr. Dee 1 utiles ton.
stale youth campaign cluvrman
for Wilson Wyatt. wW speak.
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The University Police, in an elfort to control student operation ol motor vehicles on the campus, will Infill a systematic,
car check in the ncihhorhoods siirrowndiim the campus. The
police w ill start their check on Monday, Oct. 15.
Dr. Kenneth Harper, acting dean
be a soss

Attack
Hy C.Mtl. MOHI CKI
Kernel Associate Editor

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Light Pages

)W1

At Free Spendin,

Crackdown Due
Ojh -

I,

andor

operate motor vehicles
at tl10 University,
Students registered as juniors
ancl
niors who are not on
o
demic or social probation, and
with aiw academic
sophomoies
standing of .1.0 or better may possess and operate automobiles at
the Cuiver-itproviding they
register their vehicles.
Exceptions to these regulations
be granted only with special
permission oi the dean of men and
the Student Congress Judiciary
Ij'Mld- Tl
exceptions are based
on a Physical handicap, necessary
ccmnuitin- - to classes, use of car
for hernial work, and other
needs.
l)rt)V
The registration of student auto
mobiles is now required by a state
law patterned after the previous
University ri filiations.

'

Sen. Thniston IJ. Morton is sliown lure at the Dvlta I'.ai I) Ita
fraternity '1 uesday ai'tcrneori. He fore speaking at the Sludmt
I'nion Huilding Tuesday evening sen. Morton also isited Sisina
Alpha Epsilon and Sigma Chi fraternities.

AN NO UNCUS

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.. Oct.
(it) nics.s.eje.
Schirra pirdled the globe six time today the lo:ire-- t U.S. space jaunt
speniline.
to a happy lanc'.ing in the Pacific.
yet mid spla.-hoOne of the b.i
lieedoins of
The jaunty spaceman, who had quipped his way around the earth, America!!-- , the
i:u ta;.b !,t s. nator
was plucked from the sea by the aheralt carrier Kear ae and was
to iio v. h.a ou want with
The said, "i
pronounced in excellent condition, physically and
Vour lite alai tiliu! ."
landing was about '213 miles northeast of Midway Island.
N'ot once l triiuu to Wyatt by
,;.
Nam
name,
ihjuih nted. "I
don't ja-- to cut many r.'jl.'on-- . but
A
DEN TEE. Viet Nam. Oct. 3 AP
military foice
I do i;;i!i'i".' to ..t
jv. :ci in of
by a Eoman Catholic priest was ambushed by a Communist the tmai- - tor in
ral lut.'i
12 miles from Sai'jon yesterday and suffered heavy casualband only
tate and ') )
p! o lam in l!a
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The Catholic unit was trapped while traveling aloiu.' a lonely road
.
to its new
Ten men were killed and 14 wounded alter the
convoy was halted by a land mine that blew up the lead truck.
A U.S. military adviser said: "'I jmt can't understand how 'JiH)
Communists can set up such an ambush so near Saigon without some
villager telling us about it."

DEADLINE
Oil Muller, editor of the Stylus,
campus
has
literary magazine,
announced that manuscripts now
are being considered for publication in the Fall issue.
Suitable material for publication includes short stories, poetry
and criticisms. Nov. 10 is the
deadline for submission of materials in the English Department
office, McVey Hall.
Art majors will be notified later
as to the date for submission of
their materials.
There is a possibility Mullet-said- ,
that issues will be sent to
critics for evaluation.
Dr. John L. Cutler, English faculty advisor for the Stus. said.
"Although there is no ranking of
small ma'jai'ines such as the Stylus,"In termsif content, we stand
very high indeed."

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STYLUS EDITOR

tlUt', i !' h
V,':.Ki "t..'

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S('ti(titr Ponders Quvslitm

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Lt'opoldvillf
LEOPOLD VI LLE, the Congo. Oct. 3 AP -- Albert Kalonji. the
Baluba emperor of South Ka.sai, was reported returned to prison today,
revolt in his wealthy diamond
following the quashing of a short-live- d
mining state.
tribal leader was reDiplomatic sources said the
turned to Lu.iunu Prison south of here from which he e.caped last
month. Official government spokesmen declined comment.
1IONG KONO, Oct. 3 AP
Typhoon Dinah hit the China coiet
with 115 mile an hour center winds tonight just south of the Chinese
Communist port of Swatow and about 130 link's northeast of Hong
Kong.
There was no immediate report of damage or casualties from the
Chinese Communists. This Hritish colony battened down tor sule.-wip-e
blows exiH'Cted to hit at 85 m ph.
Fringe gusts sent junks and sampans currying across the rain
lashed luubor and into typhoon shelters. Ocean lmtrs ami several
American and Hritish warships steamed out tQ .sea.
Ilony Kong still has not recovered from the ravages of Typhoon
Wanda wii.Vjh grounded more than a dozen slaps and Ictt 175 persons
dead or missing and iJj(J0 lioieles.i la t mouth.
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In tununv, to tb.e probK
mi
the iutei national si en.". Morten
said bem. ". a en a'i l r "m.u't than
being a reptt entatr.e ot pro.i cts
and pro ram tor tlic slate oi
"Ana ru a hiei .s a real and
serious linea! Im:i C .mi.iuniun,
where cp rier.ee i impoitaiit," lie
added.
ricri.it' election to the Senate ni
Av-950", Morton
.nit Secre
tary ot Slide for co;irew nal affairs.
In calling lor a lirm policy
against Communion. Morton cited
the aborted invasion of Cuba m
which "President Kt nnedv com- nutted the Hag ot the U.S.. but
didn't see it through. So Castro
Ulth seven jets rnowd m tanks
atul cut to nbhon.s ruo-- t ot the
traaud. supported, and
transported troop."
Morton sut-tc- d
that the US
shii)i at American
u,V loatini
Pl"talter thev h.ae brouglit
aunaiiunts to Cuba. He called for
to convene the chiefs of
the
ti.c lamaispht-rand liavj
Continued on I'aje 8
Ken-tuek-

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knKMX, Tluirsd.in On.

KENTUCKY

Tlir.

Chicago Doctor
Speaks Urn;

Dr. Churlrs Iluauins. rtirrctor of
Ben
tin Ui.i rrsity of Chic;c-:o'May I,;ib'r;itory fur Cancer
will deliver the second in
:
series of distinguished lectures
fd by the UK Medical Cenhprii'-i'ter.
Dr. Himcins' subject will be ' Ex-- y
Cancer."
lisiirntal
Mamillary
Kentiuky r.hysicians are invited to
the lecture to be at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 4, in the University
Hospital.
Dr. Huuuin.s was born in Halifax.
Canada, in 1901. He earned the M.
D. deLiee at Harvard University
in 10124; the master of science at
Yale University in H)47 and the
doctor of science at Washington
University, St. Louis, Mo., in 19r0.
He joined the University of Chicago staff in 1927 and has been
professor of surgery there since
lO.'HJ. He has been director of the
Ben May Laboratory since 1931.
s

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Olc jMiss Paper
Honors Newsman
OXFORD. Miss.. Oct. 2 (AP
of
The University
Mississippi's
daily newspaper, The Mississip-piahas established a scholarship in honor of French newsman Paul Guihard, killed in campus rioting Sunday night.
The scholarship will be known
as the Paul Guihard Memorial
Scholarship, with all money goinn;
into the fund to be collected from
Ole Miss students.
Up to $1,000 will be granted to
each journalism student selected
to receive money from the scholarship fund.

n.

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IFC BRA WS LINE
ON RUSH PARTIES
Ti:KKV TIIOVATO
Kernel Staff Writer

Hy

"If you luvr a class with a
u lotli want to
ruslicc. and
study together for a test, that,
is OK. However, let's not
50 rnsliees over at tlie house
studying Saturday ninlit."

lue

This was one of the ways
Council
Cooper, Interfraternity

II ill

Special English
For Foreigners
Few
know of UK's

piTsirUnt. explained this year's
rush rules mncrrnini freshmen
mm. 7 lie fust IFC nicotinic was
hrld last Tuesday night.
Hip council set up the following
rules which concern nil cliiiible
freshmen who arc out for ru.-h-:
1. Uush will work strictly on on
honor .system. IFC will not use
"noon squads" which consists of
four different fraternity men who
check individual fraternity houses,
during social functions to insure
nsainst illepal rushing functions.
Goon squads were last imploycd in
1959.

2. Fraternities may po into the
dorms to rush n boy at any time.
Engpeople
3. Freshmen rushers are strictly
lish class for foreign .students.
attending any social
Mrs. Sue prohibited
The class, taught by
function given by any indivilual
Richards, is intended for those foreign students who have trouble
expressing themselves adequately
in English.
Although there is a requirement
in most countries that a studen4
must he proficient in the languas
How did they ever
of the country he wishes to stud,
make a movie of
in; all too often his country's ide;
of proficiency does not agree witl
that of the University, said Dr
Maurice A. Hatch of the UK eng-lisdepartment.
There are 11 enrolled in the
class this year, including
FOR
students from Norway. Latin . f jiHf?
- PERSONS
America. Turkey, Okinawa, Japan
i OVER 18
and Greece.
YEARS
The aims of the class are more
W OF AGE
than just teaching English grammar. Its major task is teaching the
Wrf pmtnt
m nacuton irttti SVf
PTOOUCTONJ
English thought forms and idiond
$.
matic American expressions. This
is especially difficult Dr. Hatch
LOLITA
said due to the wide range of
languages in the class, each with ..JMS MASON SHELLEY WINTERS
its own language habits; from the
rTER SELLERS
LYON
,r-,S0E
Romantic, to the Germanic, to the
vro
.
PRODUCTION COOE ADMINISTRATION
Oriental thought patterns.
The student is graduated from
PLUS
Stewart Granger
this five day a week class into
"SECRET PARTNER"
regular freshman English when his
instructor, advisor, and foreign advisor agree that he is ready.
STARTS 7:30
ADM. 75c

Casual TiV

COLUMBUS. Ohio (.V, In tlir?
battles and skirmishes of the
War of 1812 fouzht 150 years nil,
G5 American
officers and nearly
2.000 enlisted men weie killt-- In
action.
72

fraternity until November 2G.
Social functions include;
a) Taking ruliees lo dancpi or

parties at Danrrland. Joland.
any other place where such

Switow't

NEW

Kentucky

or
a

THEATRE

function would le hold.
I) All campus jam sessions Riven l).v individual fraternitie at
their houses, or at other locations.
c) The seating of rushees In an
individual
fraternity's "section"
during football games.
ill Having rushees over at the
house after football games.
Cooper said "ho hoped that
these rules would be followed by
all of the fraternities, but if one
fraternity sees another one violating one of these rules, they should
be turned in for the violation.
This is the only way in which the
honor system will work effectively.

LAST TIMES TODAY

"THE FACTS OF LIFE"
And

"HAPPY ANNIVERSARY'
Starts TOMORROW
MY LOVE"

"FOREVER

Technicolor
STARRING
Karl Bochm
Romy Schneider
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STARRING
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MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
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ARTS

Kuril Tin- WrII Waler
-

WEST MILTON, Ohio t.V
On
the Glenn Doll farm, they .sometimes burn the well water.
The water comes from a
well drilled in 1948. Flames
dance above it when a lighted
match is held near it.
One suggestion is that natural
yas from an underground pocket
may somehow be mixing with the
water. The Doll family has been
using the water for nearly 15
years with no apparent ill effects.
116-fo-

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RJ6RICK

BY TH

(bB))

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
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Steve Iieshear was elected as
president; Lynn Wagner, vice
president; Linda Mills, secretary;
Coleman Molloy, treasurer, and
Al Merrill, chaplain. Advisers are
Connie .lo Embry and Larue
Simpson.

1

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made
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After Auburn game

Starts TODAY
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(At 9:26)
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Orders of $5.00 or More Delivered

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Shows Continuous from 1:00

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Try Something Dcliciously Different
For Your Meals and Snacks

SHRIMP BOAT

EARLY STUDENT SHOWING
Starts 7:15
Out at 9 p.m.

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880 East High Street

Members of the Freshman
YMCA held a meeting to elect
officers Tuesday night, in the

CLASSIFIED

STANLEY

9

t'

$1.10
1.60
1.20
1.25
1.20
1.80
1.15
1.35
45
55
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20
20
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29

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Air Force Sponsors
Announce Nomination

t

Thr

in
y
younw wnmni
pi
uniloiins hit the social
for the Air Force UOTC.
Their duties are drilling, paract-inand rntei taininu vi.sitiiiR dignitaries. TJie Sponsor Corps also
visits Air Force bases and forms
the honor nuard for the governor
at the Kentucky Derby.
Nominations for the corps can
be made by the ROTC men in
their classes. The nominations will
be accepted today and tomorrow.
So come on Rals. pet your Air
Force boy friends to nominate you.
The nominees will be screened
on the basis of their pictures and
activities. The finalists
will be
announced at a jam session to be
held from 0 p.m. Oct. Uj at the

r. iiKlirl.it s will ue;w Air
Koicf li.its on ampus so th.it tli' y
will be easily idcntilicd.

f

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Ur.ion LJallroom.
to the lm:il election, the

fcjtudent

I'rior
DNrusMn
plans for the nominations for Air Force
Sponsor Corps are seated, Maj. John Thistlewood;
It i t to right: Sunny Karnes, Judy
ecunda, Mari- -

l.vn Ornie, Linda Tohin, Julie Mauser, Joan Jamc
son, and Jo Tern.

V.,

nl;jp

rrsity will tench economics to
first finders this full.
Uiii

The course, to be oITered by
radio over stations in 15 Hoosier
cities, will be at the penny and
nickel level, however, rather than
in the realm of hinh finance.
Two semester courses, one va li
dealing with woik inside and nu'-sithe home, have been prep.iird
alter a program aheady in u in
Kikhart public schools.
de

No man can be happy wi!h':! ,i
a
ml nor l;e sure ol hiI luit
tiil he
unhappy 'I h n
-

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i

i

Jim Shcscley Service Station

939 SOUTH

LIME

PHONE

Year Complete Service Center

Social Activities,

SUMMER JOBS in EUROPE

Blue Marlins
Blue Marlins, synchronized swim
club, will huld its second practice
fession at 6:20 p.m. today in the
Cclheum Pool.
Attendance is required at one
cf the three practice sessions in
ciclcr to be eligible to try out for
membership in the organization.
The third practice session is
Cct. y. Tryouts will be Oct. 11 and

3C00 OPENINGS
RESORT, FARM, OFFICE, FACTORY, HOSPITAL
CONSTRUCTION, CHILD CARE, CAMP COUNSELING, AND MOPE
THROUGHOUT EUROPE. WAGES FROM ROOM AND BOARD 10
SI 75 A MONTH. COMPLETE PACKAGES WITH TOURS F ROM
6 TO 24 DAYS
COSTING FROM S 50 (rvt inclucim-- j
transportation) to S799 (including round trip jet flight).
TRAVEL GRANTS AWARDtD
FIRST 1000 APPLICANTS
Sec your Placement Officer or Student Union Director or send 20
cents fcr complete 20 page Ptcsptctu- and Job Apv'irai icn t
DEPT. N, AMERICAN STUDENT INFORMATION SERVICk',
22 Avcr-udo la Libcitcs,
uxl mbour j City,
Frand Duchy of Luxcmh uc

1C.

llvmiomivs ). (I.
Ind.

LAFAYKTI

Trans-Atlanti-

Featuring
ASHLAND OIL PRODUCTS
WORK

BRAKE
TUNE-U-

c

TIRES

OIL CHANGE
LUBRICATION

P

BATTERIES

&

ROAD

SERVICE

-

L

j

SI KY
EUKY will have a try out meeting at 7 p.m. today at the east
lear door ct Menio.i.il
Coli.-cum-

UK

Has Best DreszcJ CcoJs

The University of Kentucky is believed to have the
best dressed coed on any
campus.
The SPORTSWEAR MART,
cn the Northern Eelt Line, is
helping the University coeds
maintain this reputation cf
style and fashion.
It offers ncme brands at
phenomenal reductions. This
seme merchandise is avail-- !
able at other fine stores in
but only the
Lexinaton,
SPORTSWEAR MART offers;
at re- desigr.er feshiens
duced prices.
The SPORTSWEAR MART!
caters to the coed who can
afford the finest, but who is
wise enough to take advantage cf discount prices.
The tremendous selection
in spcrtswecr lines promises
the wise shepper beauty and
bargains. Any every item in
the store is guaranteed first
quality.

V

1

mm

mm
In

are the big buys of October.
parade formation new: coats with

a military swegger cr a dignified
Chesterfield air, smart reefers,
classic oreakoats. Join up wiili
the crowd ct

v. j.itv

.

L

r-- H,

LovventhaS's
MAIN AT WALNUT

SPORTSWEAR MART
Open 9 to 9 daily

The Little Kentucky Derby Presents

The
HVr.

DAVE BRUBECK QUARTET
Featuring
Dave Brubeck
Gene Wright

Piano

Paul Desmond
Joe Morello

Bass

j Km... .s

,,

Tlio sculptured knit:
vory in, vory "Orion Sayollo1

Drums

Hl'':T!':iro:'"

rt.t
ci

t

:.r.-Li-r-

u:u.
it

SAT., OCT. 13

..

Alto Sax

In Concert

U.K. MEMORIAL COLISEUM

.hir,

8:30 p.m.

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ki

ALL SEATS RESERVED

PRICES: $3.50, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00
On Sale
Tickets
Shockletons, Kennedy Book Store, Campus Book Store,
Palmer's Drug, Barney Millers, Graves-Cox- .

STAR CLOTHES
LEXINGTON.

KENTUCKY

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* 9

THE READERS' FORUM

Rush Is Over
can date sorority
I'ratcrnity
i
k s can sleep at
women again.
instead ol in (lasses and get
nilit
down to a routine way ol lilt. They
1,111 be'gin to stud. linsliees no longer
d to walk across campus looking
im
v pm to see it tin y should
c
.it
Smiles cm e lot gnl leu lor a
speak.
tooth and
s( in- s(, r. ( Iioups tiut
n.ni (lining
be
in
n.liy a
jviMi is o i;i;:
And now that this strenuous
(c.ei the ae!iis hae only to
Miiile at their pledges and pledges
h.;e onl to remember the names ol
tht it
.itei iiity l;r. theis and snters.
in n
C

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I

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pio-cs-

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th

N--

I'lldl

it

pun 'I. begins
new

in

idi .lis.

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eull

;

in

Ms

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o, is

and

are the liitnie

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!thoi:v,h (")
ill lie h
ipp

.

The Intei Iraleruity Council rush
liiii was reconsti in ted this year to
include a hid system. 'I his made rush
moie lair loi both the inshee ami the

s

liateruily.
Hush

ith th" uionp

s

they
seem

pit d led. the whole pioeess ni.iv
l and
heaitless to those watihing
It may
Iroin an unattached

cui'

seem that rnshees arc hint nniii'ces-sarildining this time. This, however,
is not the case.
Pahellenic makes every possible
tllort to think of the girl first. Each
rnshee has a rush counselor who will

y

is

like

.ins-

other selection

ru. bees and (".reeks choose

proces:
their it. liege friends by joining a
cioup or by pledging a rushe:.

.

hweer.

:o'.
always sexeral
it one can fit into, and tin ie
gioiips
are pleulv ol spaces lor all the
The lac t that almost ecry
l!isiit(
that plelged a sororit) got her
girl
first choice indicated that rush is
not so cruel and heartless as it may
seem to an outsider. It is, however,
a strenuous and tense time and now
that the pledges are wearing their
bright new pins the important thing
is that HUSH IS OVER.
1

.

A Job Well Done
Some of the most important and
perhaps most rewarding services offered to the students of the University are those which originate from
the Placement Service Office. Located
in the Administration
Building, the
Placement Service offers annually one
of the finest job recruiting programs
on any American campus.
Proof of this statement is found
in the fact that nearly every major
American hiring force schedules an
interview day at UK. This year, nearly 500 businesses, industries, governmental agencies, and social and educational agencies will visit Lexington.
What this means to the student
cannot be measured in terms of
finance and business prestige. What

Silicon; inlciil

it simply offers is the opportunity
to meet and talk with those persons
who offer the finest in job opportunities to graduating seniors.
The Placement Service undertakes
the huge job of setting up all the
interviews, providing space for the
interviewers to work and assembling
the large amounts of forms and paperwork that are so necessary to this
type of work.
The Placement Service has gone
for a long time without its proper
amount of congratulations for a job
well done. We salute the Placement
Service and urge them to carry on
their work with the same dedication
and spirit that they have shown in
the past and also urge all students
to take advantage of these services.

when4thcre wasn't trouble.
Times now are no worse than they
ever were. So I don't Vorry too much
about atom and hydrogen bombs. I
think the human family is growing
in inte'Jigence, and I think nature has
a gre at purpose in view for us."
Mn.roN Minoh
a time

To Tflo Editor:
Many of Mr. MalHiiU's arguments
apparently are madelioin sincere intent, and much . ol the material he
piesented probably is well lounded.'
JInwecr, his concept ol the American's interest in peace is wry shallow.
realize the present national situation and are relatively passive about it because we have a
Although
democracy.
polities are
sometimes waiped, we. as American
citiens. still are putting in capable
men, proxy wters, to uphold the
sec urify and healthy development ol
our nation. If we ever let our imagin
faith m our
ation dt e!op and
national leaders, doubt an
( h ios
(o.iJd soon reign, and our nation
con
ceiiid r.'HW ciuinl'e. Ilallhil!
slant "reminder ol peace pseeholog-iealibiings the prevent sanation ol
cold w ar to ever) one's mind: and how
it could develop into a hot one. This
causes a "loss ol laith" among those
who cannot trust their best friends,
and this "loss of faith" is almost always unnecessary.
As far as Half hill's fast is concerned, I think he should go ahead.
It will probably do him good, provided he does not destroy the mind
and body God has given him. If he
finds that his ideas still persist, he
should then use the college, or any
college, to increase his intellectual
ability so that he may later help his
nation and other nations rather than
create doubt and chaos now.
Samuel S. Fels, a businessman, recently said, "Whatever may appear to
the contrary, humanity is on the road
to better things. I have never known
Most AiiKiieans

lo--

par-tieii-

Ih.it

peiee'it ol (lie pe lg,
w

help and advise her to accept a group
she had not originally considered if
the counselor leels she would he
happy in the group. Sororities .ire instructed to drop a girl as soon us they
know they are not interested in Iter
so that the rnshee will hac a chance
to isil .is man' other houses as possible. In matching bids the advantage is alv.avs ghen to the girl rather
than the verori't)

UliMip

tn le.K h and mold its
ih d'j,es

el the oi e,,
w

is

is)

)

Sovicl Citizenship

To The Editor:
I was
vciy inuuh impressed by
Mr. llallhills comments on the U.S.
military policy. Such enthusiasm and
determination should merit at hast
Soviet citizenship and a lift lime
membership in the Communist I'aity.
Nov. could anyone" be so blind to
the past dt eds (Latvia. Estonia, Lithuania. Ibingaiy, Laos. Poland. China,
and Cuba) present acti ilii s o! woiltl
wide subversion and the u cly spoke n
plans for world domination by the
So iet Union.
Docs Mr. Ilallhill honestly believe that an atheistic dialectic materialism set ol "morals," would cause
the Soviets te) have some sent ol compassion on us in event of unilateral
disarmament on our part? I wonder
if Mr. Ilalfhill fasts when refugees are
slaughtered trying to escape the
f

"peace-livin-

g,

freedom-loving- "

con-

fines of Communism.
I would suggest to Mr. Ilallhill
that if he is afraid of the bomb to
just remember that there are people
over there afraid of it too and that
is why its not being used. It is regrettable that things are this way, but
I believe the vast majority of people
in this country prefer this to waving
the white flag of surrender which
is in essence what he suggests.
Charles W. Bonta

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

Entered at the post office at Lexington, Kentucky as second class mailt r undtr the Act of March 3, 1879.
Published four times a week during the regular school v?ar enctpt during holidays and exams.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jack
Richard Wilson', Managing Editor
Ben Fitzpatmck, Sports Editor

Peter Jones, Xeus Editor

R.

Guthrie, Editor

John Pfeiffer, Campus Editor
Dick Wailace, Advertising Manager
THURSDAY NEWS STAFF
Maxine Cates, Associate
Dan Omloh, Sports

Old Soldiers Never Die

A Look Into The Life Of Gen. Walker

My HARRY KELLY
Associated Press Writer
WASmCT()T-Fi- ve
years ago
(It'll. Ialwin A. Walker, a tough
Maj.
spit anil polish soldier, te)lel students
at Little' Hock, Ark