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  I
S FALL 1983 Vol.53 No.2
— `ll.
  .__..;   g
 »L..VL  
  ii
it  Your UK Beat / 2
  News about campus events and personnel
  Ch ll f S M / 4
  __;— 2 ~ Z Cngc O tory usgravc
  Alumnus Story Musgrave was looking for an existential experience in space.
  Like Jonathon Livingston Seagull, he relishes pushing against physical and mental limits iust to "know."
  Excellence / 9
  Excellence . . . What is it? Who should have it?
  Alumni professor of English Dr. Guy Davenport considers the topic in this essay.
  V1tal1ty/11
  Stress and depression are widespread maladies today, but here’s a how-to article
  to show you how to control those feelings and reclaim your vitality.
  20th Anmversaryl 1
  The Century Club, a group of alumni who rallied in the late 1950s to provide funds
"**"’ » E . . .
  for the construction of the King Alumni House, return to campus to mark
  3 the 20th anniversary of the fruition of their protect.
  Tobacco & Mechamzauonl 18
  Mechanizatton in the tobacco field, finding better ways for the tobacco farmer to grow and harvest
  this important Kentucky cash crop, is an on—going, intensive proiect in the College of Agriculture.
  Y
c  I · I Class Notes! 21
  An update on classmates . . . Development Office becomes a neighbor
 
I
  The Kentucky Alumnus (ISSN 0732—6297) is published quarterly by the University of I9B3 OFFICERS: PRESIDENT Paul Fenwick '53, Louisville;PRESIDENT-ELECTWilliam G.
  Kentucky Alumni Association, 400 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-Oi I9, for its dues- Francis ’68, Prestonsburg; TREASURER Mrs. Joe F. Morris ’38, Lexington; SECRETARY
  paying members. Individualdues are $l5.00 annually with $3.00 of that amount used Joy Brumfield ’48, Lexington. ASSOCIATION STAFF: DIRECTOR Joy Brumfield '48;
  in the publication ofthe magazine. Opinions expressed in The Kentucky Alumnus are ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR Bob C. Whitaker '58; EDITOR Liz Howard Demoran ’68; MEMBER-
  not necessarily those of the University of Kentucky or of the UK Alumni Association. SHIP COORDINATOR Ada D. Refbord '39; Brenda Bain, Julia Brothers, Linda Brumfield,
  POSTMAS7'ER: Third class postage paid at Indianapolis IN. Address correction requested. Margie Corby, Ruth Elliott, Amelia Gano, Carolyn Griffin, Ruby Hardin, Ennis Johnson,
  Send to The Kentucky Alumnus, UK Alumni Association, Lexington KY 40506-OII9. Betty White Nelson. ART DIRECTOR Elaine Golob Weber
 
  ..‘i   

     A I
UK 1983-84 Buclgei 7th UK Alumni Professor A
The University of Kentucky Board of deferred as a result of previous cuts will An English professor who is a renowned Y
l Trustees has approved a 1983-84 have to be used to cover it," Singletary writer, critic, teacher and illustrator has _ ai
l operating budget totalling $363.9million said. been named a UK Alumni Professor. Fr
  — an increase of 7.7 percent over the Major sources of revenue for the $26 The selection of Dr. Guy Davenport to
Y 1982-83 budget of $337.9 million. million increase in UK`s 1983-84 budget become the seventh UK Alumni Profes- tl
l UK President Otis A. Singletary told include increases of $17.5 million in state sor was announced by UK President Otis st
l board members that the new budget appropriations, $4.3 million in student A. Singletary during UK's annual ct
reflects the continuation of past efforts tuition and fees, and $2.2 million in commencement in May. Davenport was
  to: (a) improve and protect employee anticipated hospital revenues. recommended for the honor by an ad hoc T
l salaries, and (b) fully implement the cuts The increase in student tuition and fee faculty committee that reported to rc
l in state appropriations that were exper- revenue reflects a 15 percent increase Singletary. tt
  ienced in the 198(>81and 1981-82 fiscal directed by the Kentucky Council on A UK faculty member since 1963, p
l years. Higher Education. Davenport is one of the nation`s out- ol
  included in the budget is a cost of standing critics and writers. He has V
living/merit pool providing average reviewed books for such major publica- i
salary increases of 6percent for UK facul- . tions as the New York Times Book Sec-
ty and staff members. -l-he   PlllCh¤lld el-GOES tion, National Review and Life and has l
S l ` h ' f h l d h l P ` d .
  198;-zgieiisiegi lyeeenmriliileciilelpgifigii ji; Audio tapes documenting the iirelena Qgielfeijeiilleesll lees ls llll°€“"l lll l -
g which figures are available) were abour career of Kentucky statesmen/politician Alumni Pieieeeeie feeeive an annual l F
$467 lower than the median of UK's Edwllld le Pllellald_ll· wlll be added lllls stipend. Alumni Professorships are held e
"bench-mark" institutions, Singletary Yelll l0 _llle exeellelve edlleelldll dl dldl by Dr. jacqueline A. Noonan, pediatrics; F
told board members. This is a consider- lllsldlll lll llle_ Uflllielslly of Kelllllekys Dr. Charles P. Roland, history; Dr, rl
able improvement, he noted,over similar Mdrgdlel lj Klllg l‘ll°ldlY‘ William L. Matthews, law; Dr. joseph 1
comparisons for the 1979-80 fiscal year The lllllverslly 0l_lF<;tbl€¤E· ?" t
obli ation to see and to make what lsee · V U it $3* I at [ 6 €€luiPm€m
; visiléle to others." ICG On AIVCVGH used previously to determine puff
i   volume, puff duration, interval between
i Research by two UK professors of ti ni i. t utf ·
l mechanical engineering promises to yield Eggs sein mintgftasetip Wftiiicrnclgiifgti
  -— ' B°“""i Gi SE       rzrsatt;..¥*.:t;;;st;t::;;g;2s:.t:;;;£·s;**
  For the Nth successive Yeait UK'S South` DL Riciiiiid Biikebiik iiiid DL Shiva N· servicesgdeveloped quantitatesgsmoking
I east Community College, Cumberland, Singh are co-principal investigators of a behaviot oi voiunteets
will conduct an Upward Bound program three-year, $165,300 research grant from This intottnstion may be computed to
tht high tthwi Stttththtt hhtht tt gttht the U-S Ah Fvttt tht<>¤gh tht Uhhtt- smiiss studies m examine changes m
ham the Us Depaiimcm Qi Education SiiY iii Keiiiucky Riiseaicii _F°iiiidiiii°ii‘ smoking behavior as it relates to changes
The new $ll5,6llgrant is the largest Birkebak and Singh will model ice in eigtitettes These dats then mov be
ever, said Harold L Patterson, who has build-up on the leading edge ofaircraft in extended to the smoke exbosute
i directed Upward Bound programs at a UK wincl tunnel and study heat transfer etiuinnient to stutiv bioiogit tittivitv tis it
i Southeast since their inception there in between ice and surface. Experimental betttiins to ehtinge in smoking battetns
1966. t t results twill then be used with available This enuintnentt sttvs Dt Lttvten Davis,
Upward Bound motivates high school theoretical models to predict the growth tiitettot of -i—HRi_ is supppismgiy gnpx-
students toward college and other post- of ice formation on aircraft structures. bensive snti vviii be oi viue to the tottti
secondary education by means ofcounsel- "ln recent years," Birkebak said, "the institute btogttimt He snvs the entite
ing, classwork, and cultural enrichment. problem of ice formation on airplanes system costs oniv si ievv thoustinti tioiitits
"Our records show that more than 75 and helicopters has received considerable eombtiteti to tens ot thousands tot othett
percent of our Upward Bound students attention because of its importance to iess tiexibie etiuibtnent
have gone on to more education," military warfare." Dtt Gtiititht who has vents of
Patterson said. "Many are now doctors, Ice formed on aircraft structures can exbetiente in mtininuiution oi tigtitette
dentists and engineers as well as teachers increase their drag, decrease their lift and smoke ttiso unnouneeti the deveiobtnent
s and business men and women." add dangerously to their weight. Ice can oi ti new smoke exnosute svstetn which
The year-long program enrolls 60 also lead to control problems, or slough Wiii enhtinee institute tesenteh eithet bv
selected students from six area high off and damage other structures on the exposing tmimnis ot eeii euitutes to itesh
schools — Bell County and Lone jack in craft, including jet engines. eigtitette smoke.
Bth Chhhtr thd Htthtt Evite Ctwhhti     th t<»¥httt2?t·~>h pmbi€m’ hut to approximating human conditions. lt also
~ Others as Weil' allows researchers to study and
i manipulate individual smoking behavior
i parameters.
The original exposure equipment was
built by Griffith in his home workshop
and the model refined in collaboration
with Ray Hancock, THRI shop engineer.
3

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A E BY LIZ D EMORAN  
OF STORY MUSGR V /  
  ’  
When Story Musgrave '66 was ten     `
. years old, he didn't launch rockets and ‘_ . .
` _ * g _ c•uu.r..u¤¤n•
i dream about being an astronaut. Even   . ., 2  .. ‘
when he went off to college, there was if X> f   _,,,.   _’,r 1 ,,,r z ‘ ‘ * gl:  W _,_,,,_   1  
no occupation designated astronaut, ’_* *   .   at
- · .   .1·‘    ’°l,:     i,»       *2 . #gt:—   "  .-
yet in 1967 when the National    1%,.11           V    l ,.  
, , _ ,     ’   a     , li; g <* T;£;g,y;.,, ; ·
Aeronautics and Space Administration * **   ~t,,·/ 1 ,   ,   ,,2.    ....6  _ ,_x
· ·                       fr •
(NASA) selected its first corps of _     X ,11 .· ,1   »,—~         _ 4,,
· · · ·    C2, .f   1.“ Qi     . ‘  
astronauts outside the military pilot                 y  11   V      
·' r   r = ,Z“%>;.ZT.¢`a;? .   .       e
mission STS-6, the first crew to take *   ,   , _ ...·        >.,     it ,_,,,        
·   ./.¥ it · W. .     A         1   1   =»1¤  
the space shuttle orbiter Challenger         y .           t      
into outer space. It was also his  t1 A ,   E,      Q .,»,,  T,      ,         
l b h h · · ,~  /   Mr"'   ' `  / 2 ;, /             . 35  
p €2lSUI'€ IO C I C 28[ AITICYICBD (O  _· .   W it 1  ,     ,2-:   ,  _;:_..\», -l`  
. . .·  ; ·· Fi         .... 1       »...v ; 1   1’ gi;   ,, 
venture outside a craft into open space. J  ,  * ty , ’ »? .;  Y  ·r»   . ,   ·*=·        
_ y»  g ' .     1,*  1 rt 7;//iy  P, •/  y, 2._ r -‘·ja·;,    V      `¤ ¤· ·'
Tied to a 50—foot tether, he and  i (   ,g~·*<:», 1        ~ gr     .  1    xw   .,,, Q    ,   ,,.. 1  
— 1 Q ‘ Lrg. I i aw E    M K ~   ' ·»·1, ‘ f` -         l   is
fellow crew member Don Peterson V ,g  .   g     , f\{(}$Q,,_,, _ -1, ····¤   ,:   .,,,,..    V         K,1.  
. . w :     . ¤. r     /      ·1   . . 12; .».’       s. ‘
took the first U.S. space walk in nearly v_ 1         fg ‘1_;;V .. . y     yy _‘.   # ,.,.=_ ;{y §  W   <  
it decade, perfecting ways for future       ,   fw, N      ‘-·1 1   .[   t, · _  A ig 1  
shuttle crews to fix ailing satellites.     .’   W f   ff   { i    Wi ,_·1_     “’ , .   2 l   t_‘1 gs
.   —-, . , , V', ·.’” 1”     .,»..   my  I     '_ `,1»  ** 1.  .· ./ , ,._.. ( ,, 2,E. 'icfjjv m "~§‘§\ *” " tA;
Musgrave spoke at the National     , .1       . ·=·1 t       R L               g  
· · · · · a     " `1 *.1} ,·     t '       T      .'. .*f’          3 .  
Alumni Association s annual reunion   A           ,        8      
and Homecoming banquet in F*  _ .   ‘       ”‘“   `i’ii' ' Q l    
September describing the experience to { l   A  
ORC of (l`l€ l2lI`gCS( crowds €V€I` [O Astronauts on STS-6 mission in April were; seated from left, Paul J. Heitz, commander, and K¤r0l J. Bcbko,   .   _  
attend the Cvcl-IL pilot; standing from left, Donald H. Peterson and UK alumnus Story Musgrave, both mission specialists. They     3.%
.. · - .. are pictured with a model of the Shuttle in launch configuration. Photo at right, Musgrave during space w¤lk. p ‘· at
lf you limit me to one word, says  
Musgrave when asked to describe the O I · ' g ~ 
experience, "I'd say 'fantastic,' but that sensations. You know, I did my first know I was going to get up and go. I   _
word is inadequate. airplane solo about 50 years ago, so just wanted it to be that simple. But,   “’
"For 16 years, I`ve waited for this I've been in the business of challeng- we had to go to sleep, not knowing.  
experience. This is why I got into this ing physical frontiers for a long time, "Launch day we woke up with a ·_(_ t _;,· 
business — to be on the intellectual whether it’s scuba diving or definite go and got on with it. Sitting QT 
‘ and physical frontier. This is why I parachuting or skateboarding or in the van this time I knew this really  
took the job, what I am supposed to walking in space. I wanted something meant business, that what we were ‘ ~
be. to remind me that I was no longer doing was not another rehearsal and
"l can`t say that I expected it, but I practicing in the water tank." that something real was going to
wanted a transcendental experience, an Musgrave is still realizing the rami- happen. ,
existential reaction to the environ- fications and complete effect of his "I had absolutely no butterflies about
ment. l`m not talking about an illusion, five-day experience in space which this mission. I knew what was going to
of seeing something that wasn`t there. began precisely at 1:50 and 1/800th happen and it happened. I knew every .
l`m talking about a magical, emotional p.m. (Eastern time) on April 4. valve, every switch, and every number 1 r
reaction to the environment, to what is "W/hen we got to bed the night on this flight. It was sheer play for me to l
there. This is what I've been after all before the launch, we had less than a be able to so completely interact with
my life, to experience and feel new 50-50 chance of going. I wanted to my environment. The entire experience
4

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4 tremendously turned me on. can take a tool and put it here and it's brain cannot understand vacuum, and it l
j "During the two hour wait on the going to coast along with us. I didn`t responds by commanding nausea and  
l launch pad, my only anxiety was that care where the sun was, where the vomiting. It`s a lot like seasickness. I
l we might not get off. I wasn't thinking earth was — actually I was hanging "For some reason, I immediately  
l about the risk involved; in this kind of upside down 170 miles above the earth. oriented to weightlessness. I was totally .
business you accept the risk. I wanted My reference frame was the structure at home in zero gravity and felt extra-
to light those solids and go wherever of the orbiter, my work stations, the ordinarily comfortable in a no-down
l they took me. After all I had put into handholds. I did not experience any environment. I trained myself not to
the program, this mission and waiting direction as being down. Nor did I expect to see a 'down.` I was prepared _
  through all the slips (delays of lift-off experience any sense of time as you to tell myself that the floor of the
  since December), I wanted to get on know it on earth. I was totally spaceship was down and to keep
l the elevator to space, not the one back separated from it. Going around the myself oriented that way, but I found
E to earth. When the solids lit, and boy earth every hour and a half, you get that I didn't need a down. To me, the ` .  -~~’
l did they light, I felt a tremendous relief about 55 minutes of daytime and about Earth was neither down nor up. It was
W that we were going and we were going $5 minutes of night. The only clock I just there. ( -·-
Y to do this thing. had was mission time which referred "Some people are different and get ·” ;
j "The launch was a push, a lot of to how long we had been into the confused by all the sensory inputs B"
  noise, several vibrations, but much more mission and the scheduled events of telling them that down should be here,
l benign than we had expected. After the the mission. That was the only time I but, wait a minute, it should also be
  solid rocket boosters extinguished and knew; I was totally disassociated from there and the two don't match. I had i
[ fell away, the ride was totally quiet and any other reference. It sure was a done a lot of work on integrating the l
j as smooth as glass. Eight and one-half spectacular sight. I was taking in the vertical and horizontal parts of the
l minutes after launch the main engines sunrises and the sunsets — you can't spaceship, and I had no need to see or l
shut down and five days of sheer tell them apart from up there. Even feel an up or down. Since I had no A
’ pleasure without the constraints of such a simple thing as our flash eva- fixed notion of down, it never bothered W
gravity began. porator was making things of beauty. It me to see things up that should have
r "I had to be commanded to go to would throw out little icicles of water, been down. The usual treatment for
. bed. I was so hyper and there was so and you would see a tremendous SAS is drugs, but based on a subjective
  much to do and see that I seldom went blizzard of sparklets of light of all data point of one — me — we may be
  to bed before 5 a.m. Houston time. sizes, shapes and velocities come able to handle it by never having a
l "Technically, the mission was tumbling at you. notion of down.
j extraordinarily exciting, because we "Every hour and a half, we made a "The only time I missed gravity was
5 accomplished everything we set out to complete orbit of the earth, and it was when I got into my sleeping bag. I tied
l do — launching the TDRS (tracking just like getting a crash course in world it horizontally to a structure inside the .
5 and data relay satellite communica- geography. Seeing entire continents spaceship and I slept horizontally l
i tions station), performing the EVA with the naked eye is something across the shuttle. I slept up front near I
(extravehicular activity, space walk), special. We saw oil slicks off India, oil the commander just to keep him
conducting the medical experiments tankers in the Persian Gulf, the swirls company since Bo (Bobko) and Don g
(electrophoresis to use electrical in the Earth’s crust where Iran, (Peterson) were sleeping at mid-deck.  
charges to separate blood components Pakistan and India collided years ago Now I'm a 'side sleeper,' and I like to  
to a purity 400 times greater than can and the mountains were thrust upward change to different positions through-  
be achieved in the presence of gravity), by the force. We saw the White Nile out the night. But since there is no up {
and