xt7zkh0dwd0p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7zkh0dwd0p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420317  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 17, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 17, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7zkh0dwd0p section xt7zkh0dwd0p With

Ihe Greatest Opportunity In 25

The students of the University
have failed to do their part.
We hate to write something like
true and you know it.
With the greatest npiMti tunity for
past 25 veais. the students of the
Kt hi tit k have (ailed to rescind.

already contributed as much as $5,000 to the war
elfort; a majority are already on a war-timfooting
of volunteer training and sharing profits from
social functions with national defense agencies.
While at the University of Kentucky: practically

of Kentucky

service in the
University of

nothing.
T

In the matter of training, for instance, UK has
been doing a commendable job as a service agency
for the slate. The engineering college has been
technical
working overtime giving much-needenaming; the agriculture college is directing a statewide campaign to increase and coordinate food
production. Rut these are all for the people on the
outside. As far as the students are concerned, there
almost nothing.
has
For the state of affairs e do not blame wholly
on the whole, it is
the University staff,
on a fairly full schedule of outside work. We do
believe it is mainly due to the failure of the student lody to show any demand for or interest in
such classes. UK students just haven't stirred.

It's time we slopped looking the other W3y Irving to dodge i he fads. It's time we stopjH'd fooling
ourselves, talking big and doing little. It's time
that we looked at the plain, inescapable fad: today,
three months after the United States declared war
against a third of the woild, the part played by
students at the 1'niversiiv of Kentucky has been
almost alsolute zero.
1 he lew feeble efforts at something worthwhile
in connection with the present war effort have resulted in a miserable dribble, scarcely large enough
to he called a drop in the bucket.
Whereas other colleges and universities, on the
whole, have rallied strongly for national defense
assistance, defense fund drives, or voluntary training. UK has lagged back on the edge of the circle,
thinking much and saving much, but acting hardly
at all. At the University of Iowa, for instance, stu"social
dents have vohiniarlv set up a jost-wa- r
security" scheme, in which each student pays 10
tents a week to a fund to be used to aid students
returning to school after the war; at Louisiana State
physUniversity thev have organized a school-widical education program; many universities have

e

And the same thing is true of any attempt toward a ,substantial material contribution to the
defense effort.
If I'K students could read of the really important contributions being made by schools and
universities all over the nation, they would be
ashamed to admit that their part had been so
small. They would blush if they had to fill out, as
we do. quest ionaires from other schools and say:

THE

Proposing:

The UK
Student War Fund

VOLUME XXXII

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, MARCH

Dr. Ralph Woods director of vocational education for Kentucky,
and professor of agricultural education on leave of absence from
the University, will speak on "Choosing an Occupation" at a general con-- "'
vocation at 10 a.m. today in Memorial Hall.
The convocation will be part of the
2nd section of men's vocational conferences scheduled today, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. All regularly scheduled classes for the third
hour today will be dismissed, it was
announced by Dr. Henry H. HiU,
dean of the University.
Doctor Woods, former president of
the American Vocational 'Association, is responsible for the defense
program as carried on by the public
schools in the state of Kentucky.
He is also in charge of agriculture,
home economics, trade, and industrial and distributive education in
Kentucky, besides being supervisor
of teacher education in these fields.
Dean W. S. Taylor, head of the education college, described Wood as
one of the three most prominent
men in his field in the coMntry.
Bill Penick, president of the Student Union board, will preside at
this meeting, the first of the confer-entc- e
series. The sessions of this
week's vocational confemces will be
discussions of general vocations for
men, as a conclusion o? men's conference which began last week dealing with opportunities in the military services.
The series is sponsored by the Student Government Association. Topics
were chosen from preferences listed
by students who took vocational aptitude tests previous to the conference.
Following the convocation, topic
discussions will be held in the Union
building this afternoon.
The program follows:
Selling," Estill B. Hall,
Tuesday
2 p.m.. Room 204. "General Office
Work," J. P. Gasgow, 3 p.m.. Room
J04. "Advertising," RE. Scofield, 4
p m, Room 204.
Wednesday "Retail Merchandizing," C. L. Logan, 2 p.m.. Room 205.
"Chemical Engineering," Dr. R. C.
Ernst, 2 p.m., Room 205. "Farming,"
Dr. E. N. Fergus, 2 p.m.. Room 205.
Tobacco Industry." 3 p.m., Room
204. "Horticulture," Louis Hillen-nieye- r,
4 p.m.. Room 205. "Mecliani-cu- n
Engineering," L. K. Frankel, 4
p. m.. Room 204.
Work,"
Thursday "Recreational
Douglas Rainey, 2 p.m., Room 205.
"The Field of Communication" W.
Gayle Stames, 3 pin. Room 204.
"Police Work," F. X. Jahn, 4 p.m..
Room 204.
Dr. S. I. Kornhauser, head of the
department of anatomy and histology at the University of Louisville
School of Medicine, will present a
talk on medicine as a vocation at a
banquet at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, in
the Union building. Persons wishing
to attend the banquet must register their names with Dr R S Allen
"before &cc, icaiT-

'Cats Beaten By Great Lakes
Set Sail For ISew Orleans
Navy Boys Lash
Kentucky 7

STUDENTS

58-4-

For Worst Defeat
Wildcats,
smarting
Kentucky's
from their worst defeat of the. year
game with the
in a
Great Lakes Naval Station team at
Louisville Saturday night, will entrain for New Orleans tomorrow
at 6 p. m. to meet Illinois in the
National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament.
Illinois, champions of the Big- Ten, and Kentucky champions of the
Southeastern conference, are slated
to tangle in the second game of the
eastern division tournament Frir
day night at 9:30. Penn State will
meet Dartmouth in the first contest, starting a 8 p. m.
The winners of Friday nights
games will clash a 8 p .m. Saturday to determine which team will
represent the East in a final championship game, with the western
division champion in Kansas City
Thus it
the following week-enis possible that Kentucky may win
the N. C. A.A. crown by playing only
three games.
ILLINOIS SCOUTED GAME
Illinois scouts were on hand at
the Jefferson county armory Saturday night when the Cats dropped
7
a
decision to the Great Lakes
team. Coach Adolph Rupp of Kentucky stated yesterday that he had
n
ever, he does know that the
no information on the Illini.
are ranked as the second
best team in the nation, while his
Wildcats are ranked twenty-fourtWften asked what chants his
Big Blue cagers had against Illinois, Coach Rupp said that he expected to win every game which the
Wildcats play, and when Kentucky
loses, it comes as a surprise.
In their last outing the Cats fell
to a team of former college
After building up a
advantage, the
13 point first-hal- f
Great Lakes quintet staved off a
spirited last period rally by the
Wildcats to thrill a capacity crowd
macwith their smooth-workinhine-like
precision.
CATS WIN SECOND HALF
The Cats outscored the Navy team
30 to 28 in the second half but the
Big Blue warriors found their first
period deficiency too large to balance books with the Sailors.
Coach Rupp's charges scored first
on a free toss by Jim King and
went ahead 0 as Ermal Allen
followed with a duplicate shot.
The Kentucky lead was short,
however, as Great Lakes ran up a
margin before the Ruppmen
tallied a field goal. Milt Ticco and
Mel Brewer entered the melee to
start the Cat oeffnsive working
and by intermission the Great Lakes
advantage had been cut to
Milt Ticco, Ken England, and Mel
Brewer hung up 10 points each to
lead the Wildcats in the scoring
column. Marvin Akers notched three
fielders to follow with six marks on
the ledger.
post-seas-

d.

58-4-

Big-Te-

How-cham-

h.

g,

21--

4

30-1-

SIGN

DEFENSE POSTER
Sale Of Stamps
To Be Increased
There's character in a signature.
And when the signature is on the
giant poster being planned for the
new drive to increase defense stamp
sales, it is doubly important.
The poster, illustrated by Charles
Boggs, art student, features a huge
"V" rushing out of space into a
white background. It will be dis
played in the Union beginnng
Thursday. All students purchasing
defense stamps will sign this pos
ter. The names of 1000 persons will
completely fill the sheet.
As soon as the poster is covered
with names, a full page reproduc
tion of it will be run in the Ker
nel. The space will be donated by
the newspaper.
It is estimated that a minimum
of $250 will be raised before the
poster is completed.
Stamps are on sale in the booth
opposite the Student Union information desk from 10 until 2 Monday through Friday, and from 10
until 12 on Saturday.

Book Review
The Book department of the Woman's Club of the University of
Kentucky will hear Mrs. Locke
White of Richmond review Pearl
Buck's "Dragon Seed" at a meeting
Tuesday.
Mrs. White and Pearl Buck were
classmates at Randolph-Maco- n
and
were together frequently during the
five and a half years Mrs. White and
her husband spent in China

NOW UNDER WAY
Hours Are 8 To 12;
Advance Prices
To Be $1.25 Couple

or

two-ho-

ur

Swin-born-

"speedy" girls to a very rough joint.
However, his natural goodnaiurd-nes- s
and timidness save him from
going too far, but he does go home
drunk and shocks his family.
They do not know exactly how to
deal with him, but his mother's
tenderness, his father's understanding and the fact that he finds
out that Muriel still loves him bring
him out of his wilderness into a happier, more settled state of mind.
RAND ACTS WELL
Ray Rand CRichard Miller) portrays the
old adolescent,
who has a bad case of puppy love,
very well. He takes himself and all
life so seriously that the audience
has hysterics at his making such a
fool of himself. His best scene is
in the beer joint with Belle (Betty
Wells Roberts! when he tries to act
very sophisticated and worldly-wisHe definitely shows the comedy of
youth.
Dorothy Dyer Rodes as Mrs. Miller is a very convincing as the
doting mother and wife.
Perhaps her experience is an advan
ar

e.

tender--

hearted

c

ON PAGE FOUR
The Grapefruit Leaguers
Will Play On Stoli Firid

r.

'

-

'

Advance tickets to the spring formal are $1.25, couple or stag. Admission at the door is $1.50.
Students on the committee selling
the advance tickets are Harold Lind- say, chairman. Speed Gray, John
S. McLellan, Paul Combs, Gerald (
Schaffer, Marshall Smith, Russell
Gresham, Joe Bohnak, Jim Johnson,
Walter Schick, Jim Caldwell, Hilda
McClaran, Elbert Cheek, Jack Baker,
Bud Wilson, Harrison Dicksen, Windy Ellis, Allen Carstrom, Vaheh
Edith Weisenberger, and Virginia Wesley.
Hours of the Dunham dance are
from 8 to 12. This represents the
MORE TKOITERS
addition of an hour to the usual
dancing time, it was anounced yesair Doug Montiindti. horizontal, and Bill Tinker, vertical, in
terday.
thr gag ait icliiih tliey will present at Friday's Trouper show
Sonny Dunham is one of the few
sponsored h t)lK.
leaders of swing bands who plays
both trumpet and trombone in solo
I

As-be- d,

-

By JESSICA GAY
Guignol's current play, "Ah Wilderness," is a comedy about the Millers, a Victorian, Connecticut family,
and especially about young Richard
Miller who discovers love and literature tcgethr. Although it is called
a comedy, it is realy an intimate
picture of a wholesome, normal
family. Seeing the play is like going
over for a visit wth your next-doneighbors.
This is one of O'Niell's few mediocre plays and Guignol put on a fair
production.
The curtain will rise every night
this week at 8:30 p.m. and at 2
p.m. at the matinee Saturday for
performance.
the
LIFE IS WILDERNESS
e,
Richard has been reading
Wilde, Ibsen and such literature and, consequently, his life is
all wilderness and he Is in revolt
against it, except, of course, where
it concerns his girl, Muriel. Muriel's
father finds some letters that Don
Juan has writtn to her in which
"indecent" passages from Swin-borare quoted He demands that

And so in this, our first and we hope, our only
editorial, we are tailing on eveiv student. The time will come when von will te approached to do vour part; you musi not refuse.
When March conies around next vear. v.e hope
ihe editor of The Kikvu will not have to look
over the record for 1012 and write, as we must
todav. "the students of the Univeisitv ot Ken-tukv have failed."
trout-pag-

1

9.

arrangements.

Richard be punished and never allowed to see her again and h forces
Muriel to write a letter rnouncing
her lover. As a result of his crushed
love, Richard goes out with one of
his brother's Yale friends and two

part.

FACULTY FAILS
TO APPROVE
Changes Require .
Faculty Approval,
Hill Declares

Advance ticket sale for the Union
building's annual Spring formal, to
be played March 27 by Sonny Dunham, is now in progress under the
direction of Harold Lindsay, member
of the Union dance committee.
Dunham's band, which recently
clcsed a recordbreaking month's engagement at the Meadowbrook country cluh in New Jersey, scheduled a
three week engagement at Holly
wood's Palladium ballroom for April

Convincing
But Play Is Only Fair, Reviewer Says
Normal Family
In Everyday Life

-

Recent SGA Revision
Is Invalid, Donovan Says

TICKET SALE IS

Censorship is not a new problem according to Miss Azile Wofford, assistant professor of library science. Miss Wofford will
rpeak on "Banned Books' in her
lecture at the fifth hour today,
in room 314, University library.
Discussing her plans for the
open class, Miss Wofford said
that since the., fourth .century
B. C. books have been banned
and expurgated for various rea- sons.
The problem of censorship and
related topics will be fully developed in her lecture, she added.
The next "vagabond" class is
scheduled for Tuesday, March
24, when Prof. Vincent Nelson
of the geology department will
lecture on "Water Under Our
Feet: How It Has Produced
Mammouth Cave and Other Effects. '

el.

On page two of today's kiRsn we are promising a "something" which we believe can help fill
thebill. It is a plan which we believe "will be
valuable tomorrow as well as todav. It is a plan
in whiih every student in the University can take

NUMEER 4'

SPRING FORMAL

Open Class Topic
By Wofford Is
'Banned Books'

i

17, 1942

?Ah Wilderness' Acting Is
Comedy Depicts

m

RNEL

1L

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Dr. Ralph Woods Will Speak At
Third Hour Convocation Today
For Vocation Talk

"

You. peeking at the paper during physics lecture, what have the students done? A group of
girls under the direction of the dean of women's
office have been conducting a sale of defense stamps
in the Union. But the sales have been disgustingly
small for a school the sie of the University.
Yon, stirring your Coca Cola with a straw, what
have they done? A serious attempt to raise funds
for students in war camps was conducted last week,

NTUO

Z2

All Regular Classes
To Be Dismissed

T

no time to talk alioiil irh this is so. It
mav be just a local manifestation of a nation wide
citizens who secretly believe
spitit ol
that somehow things will blow over without af
fee ting them; it mav be the fault ol TltK Kkrnh
for evading the subject because we knew that the
majoiity of the students would not be interested.
Rut it is more likelv the same
attitude which was so obvious the few months
before Pearl Hat hoi reiuined in a new guise.
It is the attitude which causes an engineering
student to Mint to Tut Rf knit's editorial urging
support for the recent World Student Service
Fund and ask why we were filling up our paer
with that trijx'; it is the attitude which leads
Union loafers to laugh at the girls at the Information desk Irving to sell defense stamps: it is the
attitude of refusing to realize that "total war" calls
lor all out elfort bv every person in the nation; it
is the disuirb-me-no- t
spirit which we are told preceded the fall of Fiance.
It is the pseudo intellectual attitude of scoffing

plained.

tage which makes her hand in the
outstanding performance
of the
play.
Wally Briggs as the drunken Uncle Sid gets more laughs than anyone else. Ii the scene in which he
comes in drunk, he couldn't have
been more convincing.
YATES HAS DIFFICULT PART
(Nat
English
professor
Yates
Miller, the father! undoubtedly has
the most difficult part to portray,
but, even so, he could polish up his
peifcrmunce. This part is not
to be secondary to that of
Richard Miller, but in the Guignol
production, this figure fades somewhat into the background and fails
to be as dynamic as it should be.
The main set, which was designed
by Cluv Lancaster, and the furnishings by Alfred Andrews are unusually good. Down to the finest detail,
the stage looks genuinely Victorian.
All in all, the play is not one of
Guignol's best, but it is definitely
worth seeing. Perhaps the fact that
the four scenes can only be handled
with difficulty prevent its being "one
of the best". Then too, it drags a
little in spots, but the light mood
and optimistic outlook of the play
old
and the phenomena of a
fti&ke the play rather delightful
sup-pos- ej

ar

In Editorial
--

111 is is

Do you think we're just talking air?
Do you think we're crving Wolf Wolf; seeing
something thai isn't there?
Well all right, then, you, silting on the post office bench tell us what the students have done?
There was a dance iu the Union where everyone
had to purchase a 23 tent defense stamp. But the
crowd was none too big and some of them com-

7v

at anyone who shows enthusiasm or pint.
College .students have been told to t ic k to their
classes and keep calm, and that is good advice.
Rut is is only partial ailvice. It does not follow
Iroiu it that students should onlx si ii k ! their
c lasses.
Keeping calm does not mean separating
voursell from the big things going on all around.
We are not trying to be an alarmist. We don't
e pee I everyone to jump up and te ar around the
campus in a burst of futile: encrgv. We don't want
n t le ss
tin hoin pat i ioi ism.
anv
But we do want UK students to wake up hum
their "Oh. don't bother me" attitude. It is fir
past time for the students at ihe Univeisiiv to do
something to help the war elfort and to begin
to lav a good foundation for the peaee effort atter-wa- i

near-sighte-

lie-e-

e

ON PAGE TWO

I

d

tailed

but it fell sickeningly short of its goal. Solicitors
came back wth stories of being laughed at.
You, wating for the second hour class to start,
name one movement to increase UK's pan in the
war effort that originated with the students; name
one group Irving to do a little bit who have
not been laccil with (lie scolling or apathv of the
general student bodv.
"I hen's no dodging it
The re cord is there.

Dances as usual
No coordinated student defense program
No major campaign for defense funds
No plan for students returning alter ihe war.
No systematic service lor former students now
in the armed forces
Very few soiial classes 10 give training useful
to m ui i;i soldiers, outside the regular ROTC
And practically no student attempt to do anything about ii.
Talk about rmn plai ency, the University of Kentucky student hmly is it

e

thai, but it's

l7ears UK Students Rave

MaLovshy Is Outstanding In
Snnda). Afternoon Mnsicale
By WILYAH GRAVES
The interpretation of "Symphonie
Espagnole" by Lalo was one of the
most interesting numbers presented
by Paul Makovsky, violinist, at the
concert Sunday afternoon.
Throughout the program Mr. Makovsky showed good coordination of
bow and finger movements. His tone
was very rich and mellow with a
beautiful singing quality. The harmonic was clear and true. An excelwas
lent piano accompaniment
played by Walter Robert.
"Prucludium and Allegro ", a theme
by Kreisler
and
with variations
"Sonata in E Major" by Handel
were played in the first group. Ttie
violinist brought out the solid style
of Hatulfl in his presentation of the
Sonata.
In the third group "La Fontaine
d'Aretruse" by Szymanowski, was
outstanding with its queer, modern
harmonies
and extremely
accompaniment. The melodic line was sweet and smooth in
'Adagio and Valse" by Glazounoff.
bcherzo oy iscnaikowsky was ex- credingly last and brilliant and gave
the artist an opportunity for tech- nical display.
Two gypsy selections ware played
in the last group which were "La
Ghana " bv Kreisler and "La Camp-anellby Pastanmi.
Fur an encore Mr. Makovsky
played played a ineiody By Tschai- fast-movi-

SERVICE FUND
IS NEAR $700
Funds amounting to $680 had been
contributed to w ar prisoners' aid and
Chinese student relief during the
World Student Service Fund drive,
which ended Saturday, it was announced by Lida Belle Howe, executive chairman, yesterday.
Final reports have not been made
by several of the captains of solici- tatiens and the executive committee
expects the total figure to reach at
iea?t $7u0. Although the goal of $1200
Wi)S
not reached. Anne Morrow,
member of the executive committee
and resident secretary of the YWCA.
said the committee was plased with
the first direct solicitation campaign
to be conducted for the WSSF on
this campus.
The women's dormitories turned
in the largest amount of money with
Patterson hall women donating $106
Jewell hall. $81.80 and Boyd hall.
SC6.50. The two women's cooperative houses each were 100' ; or $1 per
person, wih McDowell house donating $11 and Shelby house $16.
Highest for the men's living
groups was Breekinridne hall with
$28.50 and Phi Delta Thetu fraternity w ith $17 5o and Alpha Gamma
Rho. $lu a'j

The amendments to the Student
Government
Association constitu
tion, approved by 20 percent of the
student body and parsed two weeks
ago by the student legislature, are
invalid. President Herman L. Donovan has announced.
In a letter to Russell Patferson,
president of the SGA. Dr Donovan
said the University would net recognize the amendments because
they had not bt?n approved by the
University faculty
President Donovan was out of
tewn yesterday and could not be
reached for a statement on the
question.
NEEDS FACULTY APPROVAL
Dr. Henry H. Hill. Ctun uf the
University, said ytsterday afternoon that, although the original
SGA constitution did not require
faculty approval of amendments, a
recent ruling of the faculty requires such approval.
I
"It seems that if the SGA were
allowed to function under its original constitution, amendments should
be made according to that constitution and any later faculty ruling
would be "ex post facto." Russell
atterson. SGA president, said,
dent government
From the faculty's point of view.
Dean Hill said th? original constitution was approved with the understanding that no radical change
would be made in ttie .student organization.
"We don't want to seem arbitrarily unreasonable about the.e things
Powers granted to a group don't
imply methods of far reaching
changes without anpruval of the
body granting the power." the dean
stated.
THE AMENDMENTS
j
were a
The amendments
judiciary amendment, setting up a
committee to try leal cases within
student government jurisdiction and
an amenrient recrganuing the SGA
pa-se-

administrative oiaiuzaiioii. establishing cemmitte-- s who e chairmen
arc appointed by th-.- SGA president.
These constitutional changes were
approved by petitions from 20 percent of the student Iwdy and passed
by tht legislature
PresiI:i his letter to PaPer-on- .
dent Donovan acknowledged notice
of the legislature's
of the
amendments and quoted the following rule passed at a uieetiing
of University faculty lat month.
The excerp fellows:
"Adoption of general policies and
covering the control
regulations
and arrangement of student social
life is the function of the Faculty
of the Univer.sitv. Subject to the
regulations of the Beard of Trustees and the rules of the Faculty of
the University, the Student Government Association
authorized to
function under us constitution as
adopted, a copy ut which is spread
on the minutes oi the Faculty of
the Urmers;itv
-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
OFFICIAL

NEWSPAPER

Bob Ammons

rCrT

Jim Wooi.nRiTr.E
Bon Hii.i.f.nmeyf

MEMBER

Kentucky tntres-llritl- t
Prna Amoclfttloo
Lrxlnirton Board of Connerc

Sports Editor
Society Editor
RG AT? FT CANTR-H.DAN SHINIil.F.ROWF.R. DANA R, OLIVER, ... Cartoons
Advertising Manager
JAY WILSON
Assistant Managing Editor
I.KWIS SAWIN
HOB AHATR

National Advertising Service, Inc.

'AAr

mltrte
at.

MA

Utrewemtatire

VMK. N.

Nl

4?fS MftmaoM Ave.

ftotJim . C.CM AtlCf RATES
"URSCniPTJOW
l on on? Srmefttr
$6.00 Op
.

V

rori,
Tear

Assim an r News

Jilt eHprf nrHrlrt irnrf rnfvmil r fn be (vmtMerejf f
mf (fi ant fterrtfliril
ffie trMferit fhmjwln,
nfrififnfi

PAT

rftr KrmeJ.

reflect the npimon

Editor
Mtivnpno Edilm
News Editor
Business Manager

IIvkoip Winn

t th Port Office t LritntrUHv, Kentucky. a
flaw me i It r under thi Act of March I. 17.

m

(yg

OF THE UNIVFKT1TY OF KENTUCKY

nn wirmexY
i"m HnUDAYS OR prmmo TrT urmoot, TA
EXAMINATION
PKRIOrW

fTO

l l lie University
he si u leu t
Kculuikv to make anv inioi lain toiiiiiliii
lion in tin nation s war tli ii can In- - blamed on
nianx things. Inn (lie outstanding one is this:
tlx' abscnic ol anv ii ;.! i a i t i to coordinate
tin xaiious small drives and campaigns.
Ii is something lo lill this abscnic whith we
would like lo il him' todav.
WC would like l
pioimsc the establishment
;it tlx- University .il Kt i.tm k of a Student W at
I iiikI. organized
and administered lv I lie Stuin Association, which could
dent Govci
one liiml all I lie conn ihut ions ol ilic
inio
vaiious gtoiips on H' t ; ii n s.
I lie
ol contributed lo
inoucv collcttcd
this liiml would be plated ill dclellsc bonds and
Ik Id lor tin- duration ol the war. Alter the war
is inn . lie moncv Ikiiii sale ol the bond would
Imused as an assistant e fund lor students wish
in;; to ii mi ii lo ihe University tor studv.

ol

1

I

I'eihaps the

I

T

we liclievc. the moncv

.

tollcilcd

thivc would go lo two good puiosis.
wheicas ii would in go to one at preset) l. It
would not onl contribute lo the war clloti today, bv pulling a large lund ol money in defense bonds, but would mean a great deal to
trip University and iis H ospce iv e students alter
the wai.
Adiuinisiiai ion ol the Student War Fund al
i
pi est in would lie plated in the hands ol a
oininii lee. organized by the Student
of reiestnl-aiiveAsvMiaiioii ami toni)os-ol he major st rxite groups on the eampus.
I his Wai bund tomniiliee would siiK'iise tol
lettious oi i mm ilmi urns whith mi,dii Ih- - made.
It would be optional (o the tonmiitiee whether thev wanted to tonduet an actual drie lot
funds on i heir own at cold or not. Certainly thev
would sttxe as a fin l a I committee for receiving
aouti ibiuioiis lo the bind. Irom luiulions ;ien
bv anv

I

1

I

stu-den-

Gov-fliime-

d

s

I

a

bv

other tanijius srous.
In ihis wax. lor instance,

a

tlub of

oi;ania-li.-

want to t;ixe a tlante "lot national
dclense:" iiMcad ihev woultl nixe il '"lor the Student War fund."' Ihe tlub will j;et all the
credit, and iheii t onit hi lion woultl Ik-- listed bv
the Wai l it ii tonmiittee. And then, when the
xvai is om i. tin aiiual money will Ik- usetl lor a
vme needy student,
itstlul Mitist
perhaps .. 2 a inoiit h prixate wauling to re-- t
I'nixer-sitx- .
nt ii io loinplcte his xvoik. lo enter the
Fund, the money
II ii were not lor the War
fiom the delciisc IhiihIs wiuld probably Ije skiiI
on a p.nix or daiit e for the club members three
oi foui xtais Irom now who most likelx woultl
nol Ik- the same loup xxho raised the inonex.
tlub mi minis lotlax ale not H,",U'A "'
So. il

uiihi

i

LUI S )MA I'AR
long ago I'lesnlt nl F.meliius l iank I ..
Noi
Mt t v ion a di Ii u it ion ol a "uuivt rsiiv"' whii h
was widtlx aiiepietl and piaiscd. Il was inadi-thi heme
ol the l'.tll kenlinkiaii. Ii was. in
bl n I. most t oiMiiientlable.
Nol all siuditiis whole heal letllv accept lliis
tjefinii ion. however. I heie aie a lew tonlound
etl it alic who lind nun h that is amusing in
lilt uiotlein tollegiaie scene. I met one ol litest
ski p! s ii t In i a in pus he ol her tlav. and bt lot e
x etl over
hall
I ioiiI.I lueak
awax he had desl
Ftl al av s t liei ished .iIm.iii lollege.
the illusions
so

I

i

v

T
lei

I

(

an

i
il Ii

ol them:

soiiii
is

ui

pi

.1

ult ill

ll i

i

'

wliiii vou it. nil lo plav binlge
lanii at iliv okes; make small I. ilk. lis when
ix
uiidmglil sii.uks evtiv uiglil
vou i. in
vou iiiliiv.iii' haiiibuigi is ant! Ii.nn to
whin
lovt inkis. It's when vou Irani lo be bond
old sh.rw 11. l.ni'li .ilxiiil fiend, it. itl Isijiiin
.mil (.otoiiei and sial't voui ovu swing nioid
colli. I' HI
"es." ii' laughs. that's ptobalib iiiliiile.
It's

pi. hi

a

--

i

I

iki
ii ii k
on ii i.i i k
leailt ship "
iiillrgi develops
t i.niiiv
il s pos
l',v si.iiiiug when vou n a lieslunaii
ilile soiin il.iv in In Ii. ill in. in ol the mouse i otu
llllltee ol plesidelll ol the ( llopia Club llllil
loi ot iIh nil. .iiIiviiv gioiip. and mole ol the
like
' I In
Ii ,i. lei s.
a iikei
Ins
i i t k on.
'

Ii

1 '.

'

,n

li

i

si

p!

I

i

I

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i

i

I

v

ill

I

'ill

So
I

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.Isle.
'

ill g

Mil
I.

Il
1" m

il

i

s

IV

III
II

t

tv liiN'ii

i

Villi all. lllS IS III SI
Willi "Col Ii ge II pi OV IS
up
I

iOVS

MUTTERING

MUSICAL

Thus man Goodman is amazing.
Time and time again he has been
beset with hard luck and has emerged with a top notch swing band. His
groups, ever since the immortal
band bearing his name with Krupa,
James, et. al., have been recognized
as the best in swingdom. The current edition is no exception.
There are several reasons for
success as a
Benny's continued
He is a brilliant, inbandleader.
spiring musician.
He has gained
the enviable title of the world's best
clarinet artist, classical or swing.
His thorough schooling in the fundamentals of modern dance band
arrangements have made his music
interesting and listenable.
KNOWS TALENT
Benny has always been able to
recognize true talent and consequently includes first class musicians in his personnel-- If he cant
find a name musician, he develops
one.
Such is the case of 18 year old
pianist Mel Powell and trombonist
comparative un- Lou McGarity.
knowns until Goodman put them in
his band a few months ago. Now
both are rated near the top on
.

their instruments.
Benny's late recordings are exam- pies cf good arrangements plus ex- performance.
Titles are
cellent
Jersey Bounce, A String of Pearki
and My Little Cousin. The first two
feature Benny's clarinet and Pow- ell's piano, while Peggy Lee and a
solid rhythm section lead the band

it

."

"Sili.
oi

v

spii

mi

ol the

it

is

the wannest, happiest

tollege giailuatc,"

I

nielli

lonlelid.

"Yes." he smiles, "uiaxbe." I he spirit ol boxs
who tanv papers lo p.iv I licit tuition, and gills
who wink .ilierniMins lo pax exHiises; clerks,
gas m. in. in .ii lem I.i ni s. waiters, txpisls, salesmen
.ill oe (ail leges without a wol rx
"Oil lege
mi inoi lis will be pleasant lieasuies to them. I
.

sllpM)se."
'

lint vou

sludenls aie

at ieasl agree that
ig io gel an etliic al ion."
II

pleaded.
hose who trowtl the grill
.lining i oi iv oi at ion. in; t lasses lor ientllv t hals,
sleep tin ii Mouilax S o i loi ks- -t lowtl iht ir si heil-Ii
with i lips and hollow ,i hook lo iiatll loi
Im. ds
guess hex wain lo learn something.

KEEPING UP WITH THE
Tonight there will be green capsules to hold the numbers that will
decide the order in which betwen
8.000.000 and 9.000.000 more men will
be subject to call for possible military service, beginning today with
St. Patrick's Day.
The completion of arrangements
for the lottery so quickly after the
registration on Feb. 16 bespoke an
official determination to have the

I

new reservoir of men ready to meet
the war demands with the least
possible delay. But the selective
service officials have hinted that the
new registrants need not expect to
be called for at least two months
after the lottery.
The lottery the first wartime
draft drawing since 1917 will be
continued in much the same manner
I'.ul the bovs ill nil il al v ," I ilespelalilv slip as the two previous service drawped