xt7zkh0dz546 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7zkh0dz546/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691006  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  6, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  6, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7zkh0dz546 section xt7zkh0dz546 Tee ICmtucecy Kmneil
fonday Evening, October 6, 1969

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LXI, No. 20

Lexington Air: Moving Toward A Crisis

EDITOR'S NOTE: In this first of a three-par- t
scries
on Lexington air pollution, the focus is on both private
and city contribution to the problem.

the eyesores which they produce, but in the harmful effects they have on health. Health ills caused by pollution range from minor coughs toailmentsofa far more
serious nature, especially asthma and other respiratory

Health Hazard
The correlation between air pollution and disease
is recognized by many area physicians, according to a
recent survey by the state Department of Health. Of the
Lexington physicians sampled, 21 percent agreed that increasing pollution was at least partially responsible
for an increase in deaths and illnesses in Lexington,
and 80 percent voiced support of new pollution legislation.
Sources of air pollution in this area are many and
varied, and UK, described by a number of graduate
engineering students as "a major source of pollution,"
must assume its share of the blame. The problem is
especially apparent on South Limestone Street, where

By DAHLIA HAYS

black smoke billows out of the Physical Plant Department, and in the GOO block of South Broadway, where
pollutants from the R.J. Reynolds building settle on
windshields of parked cars several blocks away.
City Offenders
Also mentioned by the Department of Health as ofg
fensive sources are the
heating plants at thr
city housing project on Bluegrass Drive, and the Lexington Dump on Old Frankfort Pike, where a large incinerator and a rocket-shape- d
"teepee burner" add their
part to the pollution process.

diseases.

And
CHARLES FLORO
Kernel Staff Writers
What is the "problem?" The Average person thinks
of it as "smoke," while the Kentucky Air Pollution
Control Commission refers to it as "suspended particua very fine material composed of dirt, soot,
lates
metal fumes, and mist that remain suspended for a long

...

time."
According to the commission, air pollution in Lexington usually takes the form of fly ash, gases, soot and
odors. These pollutants may express themselves in visible formsas ugly smoke or grime collected on windows,
windshielfs and laundry.
The chief objection to pollution lies, however, not in

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By DOTTIE BEAN
Associate Editor
Dr. Z. Covindarajulu, UK professor of statistics, holds the distinction of being the only man

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The Fayette County Dump, also located on Old
Frankfort Pike, no longer burns rubbish but uses it as
landfill. This practice was begun after July 4 this year,
when a fire got out of control and caused extensive
damage to the dump's teepee burner.

in the United States to attend
the first international seminar
in mathematics to be held in a
Communist country.
The seminar, entitled the International Symposium of Mathematical Theory, was held Sept.
in Budapest, Hungary.
"Things have improved considerably in Budapest since I was
there last," Dr. Covindarajulu
said. "I was really impressed
with how freely the scientists
from Eastern Europe were allowed to mingle and discuss their
projects. And the atmosphere in
Budapest was a lot more relaxed."
"The air of informality was
very different," he said. "Most
of the scientists could speak several languages Hungarian, Russian, English and German-a- nd
if one of us had trouble finding the correct word another scientist would immediately supply
it for him. They struck me as
very friendly people."
16-1- 7

These typical UK students are shown a! the favorite UK
Rumor has it that restless
in g diligently for
students like these are out to set a new record this semester for
college
Kernel Photo by Paul Mansfield
something.
pass-time-stu-

Studying'

mid-term-

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s.

Operation Intercept: Nixon's Narcs
College Press Service
From the
WASHINGTON
people who brought you nerve
gas, the moon flight and ABM,
we now have Operation Inter-

-

cept.
Operation Intercept is the Nixn
on Administration's James
title for an
air, land
and sea assault it is mounting
to reduce the traffic or marijuana and other drugs between
Mexico and the U.S. Its weapons are hardly less impressive
than those wielded by the fictitious Coldfinger or Dr. No of
Bon-dia-

all-o-

ut

007 fame.

The operation's arsenal Includes German Shepherd dogs
trained to react to the scent
of marUuana, Navy patrol boats
in the Gulf of Mexico, Air Force
pursuit planes, a web of radar
screens installed by the Federal
Aviation Administration to detect
illegal border crossings, and aircraft equipped with electronic
sensing devices capable of sniffing poppy fields from the sky.
Massive numbers of customs
exact number is
inspectors-t- he
a government secret -- are posted
at 27 U.S. airports in the Southwest, authorized to receive inter

national flights, and at 31 places
along the 2,500 mile Mexican
border, where all motor vehicles
and pedestrians are now stopped
around the clock to undergo
searches for contraband.

two-minu- te

Presidential Report
The cause for this increased
surveillance
comprising the
most intensive drug crackdown
rein U.S. history-- is a
port released with President Nixon's blessings by the Special
Presidential Task Force Relating
to Narcotics, Marijuana and Dan55-pa-

gerous Drugs.

The report, authored by 22
government personnel under the
direction of Deputy Attorney
Ceneral Richard Kleindienst,
makes the following conclusions
about the use of marijuana:

It is psychologically addicting, tending to lead to the use

-

mental health problem . . . since
persistent use of an agent which
serves to ward off reality during
this critical period of development is likely to affect adversely
the ability of the individual to
cope with the demands of a
complex society."

Continued on

rare

5, Col.

1

UK Prof Describes
Czechs, Hungarians

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of association between crime and
the use of marijuana."
Finding that pot smoking was
originally confined to "certain

jazz musicians, artists and ghetto dwellers," the report says current evidence suggests that over
five million people in the U.S.
have tried grass at least once,
Though medical evidence and perhaps 60 percent of the
"neither proves- nor disproves students at some
colleges and
that marijuana is a cause of universities.
crime, "criminal records estabContinued on Page 6, CoL 1
lish clearly an accelerating rate
-

Not only did the symposium
supply a time for discussing"
mathematical theories, but it also
gave the scientists a chance to
be informal with each other and
learn a little more about other
countries, he said.
"Everybody knew a little bit
of English and half the time
things were very informal," he
said. "We got together and discussed everything but politics.
No one ever mentioned that. We
even got around to discussing
the salaries of each of us. In
America one never asks another's
salary, but there no one was affronted since they are on fixed
salaries."
By contrast with the U.S.,
Dr. Covindarajulu said, the Communist scientists' research grants
come entirely from the government rather than from industrial
and foundation sources. "The
scientists from these countries
are very much interested in theory. They are behind us in its
appUcation to industry."
One thing which surprised
him, he said, was the atmosphere between the scientists from
East and West Cermany. "They
were not on odd terms but instead were very friendly and many
times would get together and sing
German folk songs."
In Czechoslovakia
Dr. Covindarajulu compared
the atmosphere in Hungary to
that of Czechoslovakia, where
he also went after the seminar.
"In Czechoslovakia I was very
sad," he said. "I stayed there
for three days and I noted that
the young people were very unhappy, frustrated and insecure.
There were a great many Russians there in plain clothes and
"

Continued on Pase 8, Col.

3

Religious Liberals Back Oct. 15

By TOM BOWDEN
Kernel Staff Writer
"All of our presidents lie to
us. But they will respond to public pressure."

And the Vietnam War Morabecause once torium Day will give people a
of hard narcotics,
chance to bring public pressure
the user has adopted the drug on
the federal government to end
with life
as a "crutch to cope
the war, according to the Camstress," he is "substantially more
Religious Liberals, (CRLs),
susceptible to the acquisition of pus met
who
Sunday night inthe Stua larger crutch through the medent Center.
dium of a stronger drug."
Mason Taylor, graduate stuIts widespread use by the
young constitutes a "significant dent in sociology, said the pur

pose of the moratorium day is
to help people "learn about the
Vietnam war, its history, and t lie
history of American involvement."
To be held Oct. 15, the
'Teach-In- "
is
to include
speeches, poetry readings and informal folk concerts relating to
the Vietnam war.
Dr. Wayne Davis of the Zoology Department objected to any
cancellation of classes on the
moratorium day on the grounds
that students who liave paid for
their classes will be unfalily de

prived of their right to attend.
Although Taylor expects that
the majority of activities will be
anti-wa"pro-wa- r
people are
welcome to come and speak."
r,

For this reason, Taylor dismissed Dr. Davis' objection as
"a false issue."
Taylor urged those present to
ask their professors to cancel
their classes on Oct. 15, and he
added that facilities are available for CRLs to print antiwar
literature for distribution during
moratorium activities.

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Oct. 6,

19G9

'Dirty Pictures' Combines
Best Of Salinger, Heller

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By DAN COSSETT
Arts Editor

"Dirty Pictures From The Prom."
Dy Earl M. Ilauch, Doublcday,
$2.93.

It has often been said that by
reading what an artist has
written, you can determine what
he (the artist) has read. If that is
an accurate indicator, Earl M.
Rauch is quite a
artist.
In his first novel, "Dirty Pictures
From the Prom," Rauch has managed not only to reflect, but
also to synthesize the work of
Salinger, Heller and several
others.
well-rea- d

That would be a tremendous
accomplishment for any author,
particularly in a first novel, but
for a
college student
from Abilene, Tex., who was a
member of Future Farmers of
America, it is phenomenal.
Rauch is now a sophomore
'at Dartmouth, having won a
Merit Scholarsliip.

At age eight Creynaldo dies
of leukemia and goes to heaven.
In fact, all of the characters that
die go directly to heaven or hell.
All of them also have the remarkable ability to communicate with
Bamaby and advise him on his

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life.

screwed-u- p

It is in the relationship of
Bamaby and Creynaldo that

Rauch takes on some of the tendencies of J.D. Salinger. The Class
family of "Raise High the Roof
Beams, Carpenter" and "Franny
and Zooey" bears a remarkable
resemblance to the Saltzers. Even
more, the concept of the older
brother being even wiser than the
genius second son is verysimiliar
to the relationship of Seymour
and Buddy in "Franny."
Heller's influence shows in
two areas. First, the wildly
stylized characters that hall
marked "Catch-22- "
have definite
counterparts in "Dirty Pictures."
There is a homosexual midget
wrestler, an
guerilla chief
named Captain Bluebird and
Creynaldo in the afterlife, where
he tries to depose Cod.
Related to the characters are
the wildly outrageous adventures
that Barnaby gets into. Unlike
those in "Catch-22,- "
Bamaby's
exploits are tainted with misfortune and a touch of melancho- -

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Striptease

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Guignol Theatre actors perform a scene from J.M. Synge's Irish
classic comedy, "Playboy of the Western World." Directed by
Charles Dickens, "Playboy" will run Oct
at 8:30 p.m. with
the Sunday performance at 7:30 p.m.
Kernel Photo by Dick Ware
8--

77 rKEIUTUCICY
c
NOW SHOWING!
Pdrsmount Pictures presents

1
Phone
1225 North Broadway
Northland Shopping Center
OPEN 9:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
255-876-

Monday thru Saturday
Aileen;

ex-Na- zi

Dirty Pictures" is told in the
first person by Darnaby Saltzer
who is passed off as the author
of the book. The format has the
editor of the book reviewing the
final manuscript before it goes to
press, and after each chapter
there is a dialogue between Barn-ab- y
and the editor on the conly.
tent of the chapter and the phrasing. These conversations must be
read carefully, because it is there
pirc 220 EAST MAlNflTT
that they decide what is to be
be left in.
deleted and what is to
NOW! FIRST RUN!
The effect here is tremendous.
at
If in the conversation, they decide
long las-tto delete a paragraph or a drawthe long
ing, the section in question is
awaited
on the page and
reproduced
Lawrence
marked through with a heavy
- Durrell's
editing pencil.
Also interspersed throughout
the book are drawings and quocomes to
tations from "Dialogue with an
the screen
Unknown
Madame
on the Coach Ride to Tours,"
liw 1
written by Bamaby's older broI
ther Creynaldo. The language in
these quotations are outrageously
profane and the drawings are rep0
resentations of various anatomic
parts of the aforementioned
2nd BIGWEEK!
"Madame."
A man went lookine for America
n
i
The plot of the book revolves
And couldn't final it anywhere...
around Barnaby and his relation:
.
II
ship with his brother Creynaldo.
Creynaldo was a
CANNES FILM
who had philosophers, theoFESTIVAL
logians and scientists clamoring
WINNER!
"J
around him at age four to advise
"Best
i
on the world's problems. BarnDirector"
aby is just a minor wizard, but
mux
C0M(HT
still is not jealous of his brother.
pnM
he looks to Creynaldo '
Instead,
for guidance and wisdom.

.

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Call it a weskit, . . . call it a
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paired with a soft turtleneck
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slacks, the dash of a buckle
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Order Cards located in college bookstore.
Send no money. Mail your card today.

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407 South Limestone
Phone

255-752- 3

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Oct.

r"

-

l9-- 3

Jennifer Also Due At Coliseum

:;

Mason Williams Booked By SCB

The Texas "Renaissance ten six other books and is cur single "Classical Cas," an inBuckaroo," Mason Williams, is rently working on three more, in- tricate guitar piece, and his alcoming to Memorial Coliseum cluding a cookbook which fea- bums "The Mason Williams
at 8 p.m. Friday. Tickets are tures such delicacies as "Boston Phonograph," "The Mason Wil$2.00 and $2.50 in advance; sales Baked Ball Bearings," "Alumiliams Ear Show," and "Music."
begin Wednesday in the Student num Potatoes," and "Parked He has performed with various
Steak" that is "held up by a symphony orchestras across the
Center. .
bicycle kick stand You cook it nation, including an appearance
Appearing with Williams will
parked, then kick the stand down with the Boston Pops at a
be Jennifer Warren, star of the
and eat it."
sponsored by Sen. Ted
t
cast of
original
Also a television writer, WilKennedy.
and past featured singer
"Hair,"
with the popular rock band, The liams has written scripts for such
Since appearing on the set of
programs as "The Smothers
First Edition.
Brothers Show," "The Roger Mil"Hair," Jennifer Warren, a proMason Williams is a poet, best ler Show," and for The H. Antege of Ken Kragen and Ken
known for his book "The Mason drew Williams Kalaidescope
Fritz, has joined company with
Williams Reading Matter," a vol- Company.
Tom and Dick Smothers, Pat
ume of poetry, lyrics, conundrums
Williams is well known as a Paulsen, The First Edition, Clen
and photos, but he also has writ musician. His hits include the Campbell and Mason Williams.

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TODAY and TOMORROW

ii.

The deadline for announcement

Memorial

Today

Coliseum - Oct.

10

Tickets on Sale Starting Sept 24
Student Center
$2.00 and $2.50

S.W.I.T.C.H. will have a meeting at
7 p.m., Oct. 6 at 405 Woodlawn Ave.
Everyone is invited and all senior
social work majors are encouraged

to attend.
There will be a sophomore
d
meeting at 7 p.m. on
Oct. 6 in the Commerce Monday.
Building
Auditorium in Room 108. Dr.
d
urges all sophomore
students to attend.

.

Pre-Me-

pre-me-

Tomorrow

In

7:30 p.m. twe days prior to the first
publication of Items In thli column..

pre-la-

Roteract, a service organization, will
hold a meeting at 7 p.m., Oct. 7 in
Room 109 of the Student Center. All
interested persons are invited to attend.
The Homecoming Committee will
meet at 6:30 p.m., Oct. 7 In Room
109 of the Student Center. Anyone
interested is invited.
The Russian Club presents "Films
of the Soviet Union" taken and narrated by Dr. Fayer who lived in the
Soviet Union and visited there twice.
All are Invited to Room 245 of the
Student Center on Tuesday, Oct. 7 at
7:30 p.m. There will be refreshments
following the program.

Coming Up
Opening on Oct. 8 and running
through Oct. 12, the Department of
Theatre Arts will present at its Guig-nTheatre, J. M. Synge's "Playboy
of the Western World." This will be
tne first in a series of three highly
exciting and provocative dramas. The
second production will be an
production of Thornton Wild-er- 's
"The Skin of Our Teeth," to be
Oct. 23 through the 26, followed
given
by "Billy Budd" which will be shown
December
The Weekly Student Government
meeting will
be held at 4 p.m. on Oct. 9 in Room
243 of the Student Center. All interested students are invited to attend and ask questions of the Student
Government President.
"Societas Pro Legibus," the leadership and scholastic honorary for
ol

7.

Executive-Student-Pre-

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer

session.

Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4986.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

""TV

30

ir

KERNEL

$9.45
$.10

TELEPHONES

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation

Dlavtex
self-adjusti-

RATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files

absorbent

students, is now accepting
applications for membership. Applications may be obtained at the East
Information Desk in the Student Center or at 103 Bradley Hall. Deadline
is Friday, Oct. 10.

2321
2320
2447
2319
i

UK Placement Service
Register Tuesday for an appointment Thursday with the Aluminum
Company of America Locations: Tennessee, Texas, Arkansas, other. December, May graduates. Schedule I:
Mechanical Chemical E., Electrical E.,
Mechanical E., Metallurgical E. (BS,
AcMS). Schedule II:
counting, Journalism (BS, MS).
for an appointRegister Tuesday
ment Thursday with Louisville Gas
& Electrical Co. Chemical E., Civil
E., Electrical E., Mechanical E. (BS).
Location: Louisville. December, May,
August graduates.
Register Tuesday 'for an appointment with Tennessee Valley AuthorEconomcis,
(BS);
ity Accounting
Chemical E., Civil E., Electrical E.,
Mechanical E., Physics (BS, MS). Locations: Cleveland, Cincinnati, Pittsburg. May graduates.
Register Friday or Monday for an
appointment Tuesday or Wednesday
with Texas Instruments, Inc. December, May, August graduates. Chemical E. (BS, MS); Engineering Mechanics, Electrical E., Chemistry,
Physics (all degrees). Mechanical E.
(all degrees). Computer Science (BS);
. Metallurgical E., (all degrees).
Register Monday for an appointment Wednesday with Celanese Corp.
E.,
Accounting, Math, Chemical E. Me(BS,
chanical E. (BS); Electrical
MS);
Chemistry, Physics (all degrees). Locations: East, Southeast,
.Southwest. December, May. August
graduates. Citizenship of permanent
visa.
Register Monday for an appointment with Federal Aviation AdministrationCivil E.. Electrical E.. Mechanical E. (BS, MS). Location: Washington, D.C. DcvCiibtrr, My, August
graduates.
Register Monday for an appointment Wednesday with General Dynamics Corp. Convair Division
Electrical E.. Mechanical E. (BS, MS);
Engineering Mechanics (MS). Locations: San Diego, Cape Kennedy. December graduates.
Register Monday for an appointment Wednesday with Halliburton
Services Chemistry, Geology, Civil
E Agricultural E., Chemical E., Metallurgical E. (BS). Locations: Midwest, East Central U.S.A. December,
May, August graduates. Will interview
Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors
in Engineering for summer employment.
Register Monday or Tuesday for an
apponitment Wednesday or ThursOil Corp. Chemical
day with Gulf E.
(BS, MS). LocaE.. Mechanical
tions: U.S. December, May graduates.
al

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You get more than two months' supply free.
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OCTOBER 7, 8, end 9
Program 1
STUDENT CENTER THEATER. Arfmit.Jo $l!oo
SHowtim

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* The Academic Year Ahead
suspicion; it makes teaching a dependency of sponsored research.
It is not enough for President
Nixon to assure the students, as
he did on Saturday, that he shares
with them a concern over the same
problems. He must device a cohesive policy both in support of
higher education and in the reordering of national priorities.
Outlines of a nationwide policy
for the support of students and institutions have been ably sketched
by the Carnegie Commission on
Higher Education. Until these

the start of the academic
it is futile to try to predict
year,
what the state of the campus will
be the next few months. Last year's
disruptions proved the unpredictability of the extremists, who often
struck hardest at liberal institutions.
With faith in the intelligence
At

and decent instincts of the majority of students, there is reason to
hope that the romantic appeal of
chaotic guerrilla tactics may wane.
The fact that leading university
administrators spent much of the
summer recess in efforts to dissuade

i

.

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er

The current jargon emphasizes
the "restructuringof university
ernance;" and the reform of procedures, from trusteeship to student participation, is indeed important. But in the final analysis
the strength and integrity of the
academic community will depend
on the readiness of its constituencies to live in the rational spirit
of mutual trust. The key to the
future remains the willingness of
faculties, as the central force, to
focus on shared campus purposes
and to safeguard, not vested interests, but the intellectual and social

ture.
Harvard and Stanford have now
joined the academic procession toward review and reform of campus:
government procedures. Their ac-- i
tion is added evidence that the'
infusion of new and younger blood
into the university trusteeship is
gathering speed.
After last year's bitter experience, university administrations
may be better prepared to use the
courts and the legal process in maintaining peace. But this, though
necessary, deals only with emer-- ;
gencies. The deeper problems of!
American higher education will not;
be solved on the barricades; they
require rational and cooperative
by all segments of the
academic community and a readiness by society to reassess higher
education's financial support.
Internally, the machinery must
be created for continuous review
of academic content, methods and
goals in teaching as well as in
research without slavish adherence to the status quo or fitful
surrenders to fashionable demands.
Although relevancy is of the essence, most learning is rendered
relevant, not by course titles but
by the spirit of teaching and learn-

mission of scholarship.
New York Times

Epilogue
Nov

is

that the UK Wildcat
Marching Band has had ample
time to air its views and accept
its criticism as maturely as it has,
a footnote should be added to the
episode. The performance of the
band at the Mississippi game was
definitely the best seen at Kentucky in the past four seasons.
The pep function of the band,
the issue recently in contention,
was significantly improved. Abroad
catalog of tunes was utilized to
good advantage. A strong attitude
ing. Creek tragedy can be more of team support was apparent in
relevant than urban sociology.
the band's conduct. Perhaps more
The just demands of the
than any other external factor the
minorities are at last being Wildcat band was responsible for
heard and honored. Past neglect the win over Mississippi.
must now be turned into a policy
In a maturing group, as in a
of truly equal opportunity, with- mature individual, praise and critout either the condescension of icism must be evaluated with equal
charity or an un- weight. A healthy response to both
principled retreat from the goal of actions indicates a depth of concern that other attributes cannot
speara-tiiintegration' into dead-enapproach. UK's band and its direcUnfortunately, the excitement of tor will acquire this quality of reconfrontations has overshadowed
sponse eventually.
the realities of a shaky fiscal founIn the meantime we look fordation. Rising costs have turned ward to the band's future. There is
Federal subsidy into the unac- only one more suggestion. It would
knowledged, often hidden prop. In seem much more practical if the
the absence of a cohesive policy band wer,e placed in the western
universities have learned to rely on end zone. In this position the stuFederal research money for a major dent body, which constitutes the
part oftheiroperatingbudgets.This
major portion of UK's cheering
not only exposes them to political section, would be able to hear the
controversy at a time when stu- band much better, and we would
dents view governmental goals with all benefit.
non-whi- te

ed

d

nrrr

either.

self-servi-

guilt-motivat-

rfr

questions are
faced, university administrators
will walk a precarious tightrope
between fiscal and academic dilemmas, without giving more than
crisis treatment to
patchwork
bread-and-butt-

vindictive legislators from declaring open season against students
ought to convince the moderate
majority that the radicals' portrayal
of a repressive university Estabcaricalishment was a

self-analys-

r

m.

Black Study

Kemel Forum: the readers write
Justice Prevails
I would like to comment on the recent
articles concerning the UK band that
have appeared in the Kernel. Your views
are different from mine; but nonetheless they are your views and I respect
them as such. I wish to commend the
band on their first "show". As time
passes, I am sure they will produce better "shows" and will perhaps meet your
approval. Their first one far exceeded
my imagination. As a student of UK I
can justifiably say that we have a band
of which to be very proud of. Considering the short time they had in learning
their "new patterns" I was amazed at
the accuracy at which they performed
them.
I have looked at the situation at hanct
from an objective point of view since
I have no connection with the band
other than that of an admirer of the
sound and performance they created both
during the game and at
I am sure your comments have developed an adverse affect on the band.
I am hoping it does not affect their desire to continue to work hard and to do
well. They should know that I (among
many) am one hundred percent appreciative of their hard work that truly was
evident at the UK-Igame.
To the UK band and to Mr. Clarke
I extend my most humble admiration and
loyalty.
half-tim-

e.

were the issues being studied in this case.
The police weren't informed previous to
the "abduction" to enhance the validity
of the experiment.
In concIusiohTT would suggest that the
editor research issues thoroughly before
he elaborates upon them. The fact is that
the "abduction" car was located three
hours later, and explanation was made
to the complete satisfaction of the authorities.
JACQUELYN TROIDL
AficS Junior
JOYCE COCHRAN

Ed. Junior
BARBARA

MYERS

Ed. Soph.
EDITOR'S NOTE: At the time the editorial was written the Lexington Police
Department had not found the automobile
in question, nor had they been notified of
the experiment.

Dear Sir:

The following is a
letter recently sent to President Single-tar-y
with a copy to the Kernel.
A program has been established here
at the University of Kentucky for October 15 in conjunction with the National
War Moratorium. This program, along
with the programs already set up on over
500 college campuses, seeks to make the
RAY E. LAWRENCE
University community more aware of the
Junior problems of our involvement in Vietnam.
The War Moratorium Committee at
the University of Kentucky has arranged
for several members of the University facMisleading?
Sed-leulty, Including Law Professor Robert
In reference to the editorial of Septemthe Morato address those attending
ber 24th concerning the experiment contorium.
ducted by the 536 Deviant Behavior class,
We would like you to beome part
may I say that it is another graphic examof this program by leading the Invocauninformed
ple of the
tion in honor of the war dead.
editorial policy employed by the Kernel?
An appointment has been made for
The article not only presented misleading
October 6 at 4 p.m. at which time we
Information, but ignored the facts in at
will speak to you more fully,
least one instance.
War Moratorium Committee
The main issue taken by the editor
KAREN SCHROEDER
was that the experiment fostered unconAssistant Chairman
cern because it wasn't real. As a matter
of fact, the whole purpose of the venture
EDITOR'S NOTE: All letters to the
was to observe crowd reactions in a real
and not
must be tyed,
situation; and it was staged in a manner