Lexington, Kentucky photograph albums

Abstract

With The Lexington, Kentucky photograph albums (dated 1866-1940; 0.28 cubic feet; 2 boxes) consist of photographs depicting Lexington, Kentucky in the late 19th century through the mid twentietch century.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Lexington, Kentucky photograph albums
Creator
Foley, E. B.
Extent
0.28 Cubic Feet
Subjects
Lexington (Ky.) -- Pictorial works.
Architecture -- Kentucky
Finding Aid Author
Sarah Coblentz
Preferred Citation
2015av015: [identification of item], Lexington, Kentucky photographs, 1866-1940, University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
E. B. Foley (1880-1952) was a United States Postal Service worker and grocery store owner in Lexington, Kentucky.
Scope and Content
With The Lexington, Kentucky photograph albums (dated 1866-1940; 0.28 cubic feet; 2 boxes) consist of photographs depicting Lexington, Kentucky in the late 19th century through the mid twentietch century. These photographs were produced from negatives originally owned by E. B. Foley (1880-1952) a United States Postal Service worker and grocery store owner in Lexington, Kentucky. Many of the photographs document historical architecture and street life of Lexington and are original. Also included are reproductions of original images, including tintypes.

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Conditions Governing Access Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
The physical rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.

Contents of the Collection

First Lexington post office- southwest corner of Short and Mill streets, undated

  • Box 1, item 1
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Kentucky State University; now Transylvania University, undated

  • Box 1, item 2
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Eight soldiers armed with rifles standing in front of house, undated

  • Box 1, item 3
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Lake, power lines, and trees in front of houses, undated

  • Box 1, item 4
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Springhouse Bar at Main and Spring Streets, undated

  • Box 1, item 5
The Peabody Shirt factory was on the ground floor of the large building. The second floor was occupied by Scott's Roller Rink about 1940.
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The Water Street entrance to the Phoenix Hotel dining room-- Limestone and Water Streets, undated

  • Box 1, item 6
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The Foley family in front of their early home in the South Elkhorn neighborhood on Higbee Mill road, undated

  • Box 1, item 7
Left to Right: Margaret Cravens Foley, Sanford Foley, Fannie Foley, Bettie Cravens Foley, Bettie Cravens Foley, Jacob S. Foley, and Mattie Foley.
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Northwest corner of Broadway and Short Street, circa 1870

  • Box 1, item 8
Site of one of the first post offices in Lexington. Later, it was the site of the Vogt & Foley grocery, and later a Piggly-Wiggly and a Kroger store.
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E.B Foley's store at South Elkhorn, circa 1900

  • Box 1, item 9
E.B Foley is in the center of the picture with the light jacket on. His father, Alex Foley, is to his left in the blnack hat.
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An old schoolhouse in the vicinity of South Elkhorn, undated

  • Box 1, item 10
E.B Foley is on the back row, third from the right. His cousin, Fannie Foley is on the first row, fifth from left.
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Young men gathered on steps, undated

  • Box 1, item 11
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H. M. Milton's tailor shop located on Main Street, undated

  • Box 1, item 12
H. M. Milton is seated at table.
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Young man posing on railroad tracks, undated

  • Box 1, item 13
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General W. H. Polk, circa 1866

  • Box 1, item 14
Polk was a newspaper man, confederate soldier, and chief of the Lexington fire department.
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Eastern Kentucky Asylum for the Insane, located on Fourth Street, circa 1920

  • Box 1, item 15
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Site of Boone's Fort at Boonesboro in Clark County, undated

  • Box 1, item 16
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Elmore C. Fain and Elise Lee Mulligan (Mrs. E.B. Foley, Jr.) in Swift & Co's. float in the Sesqui-Centennial Parade parade in Lexington, 1925

  • Box 1, item 17
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Andrew Jackson Fain and daughter, Bess (Mrs. Liberty Green) in front his real estate office, undated

  • Box 1, item 18
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Kentucky Association Track, circa 1900

  • Box 1, item 19
Establish in 1826. It was sold to Kentucky Jockey Club in 1918. This track was located near Row and Sixth Streets. The area is now a housing project.
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Otto Gruner, Jr., helping out one of his customers to drink a glass of beer while standing on his head at the Main Spring Bar on West Main Street at Spring Street, undated

  • Box 1, item 20
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Otto Pop Gruner, owner of the Main Spring Bar having a beer with one of his customers, undated

  • Box 1, item 21
His son, Otto, Jr. is in the background.
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Nick Ryan Saloon, undated

  • Box 1, item 22
At one time the Weitzel Resturaunt, now the New Way shoe shop, located on the east side of Mill Street between Short and Main Streets. It later burned.
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County Clerk's Office, 1940

  • Box 1, item 23
Left to right: Steve Banahan, Pete Foushee, Lucille Moore, S. Higgins Lewis, John Guy, Margaret Kane, Doc Henry, Mattie Smiley, Porter Land, Sam Downing, Jimmie B. Lyons, Mrs. Prather, Miss Lewis, Bob Ledford, Carter Haley, and John Mooney.
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Northeast corner of Short and Market Streets, undated

  • Box 1, item 24
Later the Lexington Leader Building. The building to the left was later the University Book Store owned by Frank Battaille.
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Northwest corner of Upper Street at Church Street, building an addition onto the rear of Christ Episcopal Church, circa 1885-1890

  • Box 1, item 25
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Phoenix Hotel located at Main and Limestone Streets, circa 1890

  • Box 1, item 26
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Phoenix Hotel lobby, circa 1900

  • Box 1, item 27
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Joseph Harting House, undated

  • Box 1, item 28-29
Later owned by the Black family and bought after that by Broadway Christian Church. It was demolished in 1970. At one time it was used for a medical school.
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Lexington Officials, 1940s

  • Box 1, item 30
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House owned by the Widow Parker, grandmother of Mary Todd Lincoln, the wife of Abraham Lincoln, undated

  • Box 1, item 31
Mary Todd Lincoln was born in the house next door which is now the rectory for Saint Paul's Church.
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House in Lexington with bystanders, undated

  • Box 1, item 32
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View of State College of Kentucky, undated

  • Box 1, item 33-34
Picture taken from Winslow Street (later Euclid Ave, now the Avenue of Champions) corner of South Limestone Street, showing the Administration Building.
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300 block of North Broadway, Lexington, undated

  • Box 1, item 35
Once were residences of D.F> Frazee and J.M. Scott, building on left now occupied (at time of photograph taken) by Mr. and Mrs. Tony Zappone.
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Residence of Wilbur R. Smith, Limestone and Maxwell streets, undated

  • Box 1, item 36
Later used as Baker Funeral Home about 1920, now used for a parking lot for visitors to Good Samaritan Hospital.
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Loudon on Bryan Station Road, undated

  • Box 1, item 37
A Tudor-Gothic style home erected in 1850 by Francis K. Hunt on 56 acres for $30,303. It was one of the finest houses in Kentucky. Sold to Colonel William C. Goodloe in 1880. Sold to the city and later became community center for Castlewood City Park.
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Sayre Female Institute, undated

  • Box 1, item 38
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Hamilton Female College - North Broadway, undated

  • Box 1, item 39
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Ingleside, home of Hart Gibson, undated

  • Box 1, item 40
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Residence of Dr. William Rhodes on corner of High Street and Rodes Ave, undated

  • Box 1, item 41-42
Presently the site of the Calvary Baptist Church.
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500 West Second Street, Northwest Corner, undated

  • Box 1, item 43
Later the John Milward Funeral Home. After that, St. Joseph Hospital Nurses' Home. Now Second Street YMCA.
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Glendover , 1898

  • Box 1, item 44
Built about 1820, was the home of many families including the Widkliffes and Prestons.
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Unidentified men in front of building with construction, undated

  • Box 1, item 45
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Spanish-American War soldiers at the Lexington Trotting Track and Fairgrounds, 1898

  • Box 1, item 46
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Picnic grounds at the Trotting Track, undated

  • Box 1, item 47
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Tents in Woodland Park, circa late 1800s

  • Box 1, item 48
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Auditorium at Woodland Park, 1897

  • Box 1, item 49
Was at the edge of town when picture was taken, the auditorium was used as a concert, convention, and religious hall among other things.
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Sam Lee [center, foreground] in front of first swimming pool at Woodland Park, 1890

  • Box 1, item 50
Lake was later drained due to a drowning. It is now used for a ball field for children playing in the park.
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Morrison Chapel at Kentucky University (now Transylvania University), undated

  • Box 1, item 51-52
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View of Kentucky University (now Transylvania University), undated

  • Box 1, item 53
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Morrison Chapel at Kentucky University (now Transylvania University), undated

  • Box 1, item 54
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The old Johnson School at Fourth and Limestone Street, undated

  • Box 1, item 55
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Hamilton Female College, undated

  • Box 1, item 56
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Old Gibson Mansion, undated

  • Box 1, item 57
Built in 1800, transformed in 1849 by Thomas Lewinski and John McMurty into a 24-room mansion. It was at one time the residence of Joe Clark, and is located at 437 West Second Street. Was referred to, at one time, as the January House.
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Lyndhurst, the Kinkead home, undated

  • Box 1, item 58
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Residence of W.S. Barnes, undated

  • Box 1, item 59
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View of Third Street, looking west from North Broadway, undated

  • Box 1, item 60
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Unidentified man on horseback, undated

  • Box 2, item 121
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Unidentified man on sidewalk in front of shops, undated

  • Box 2, item 122
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View of unknown house, undated

  • Box 2, item 123
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View of unknown, rundown house, undated

  • Box 2, item 124
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View of unknown house from across the street, undated

  • Box 2, item 125
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Top image: Unknown house; bottom image: Busy street view from above, undated

  • Box 2, item 126
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Top image: Unknown house; Bottom image: Unknown house obscured by trees, undated

  • Box 2, item 127
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Unknown house, undated

  • Box 2, item 128
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Unknown house with line of cars in driveway, undated

  • Box 2, item 129
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Unknown house from across a yard, undated

  • Box 2, item 130
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E.S. Delong residence, undated

  • Box 2, item 131
At one time was Lexington Senior High School.
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St. John's Academy, a parochial school for boys, undated

  • Box 2, item 132
Established in 1854 at the back of St. Peter's Catholic Church on North Limestone. In 1902, it was merged with St. Paul's School. This old two story building faced Walnut Street and was torn down in 1909.
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Original home of Judge J.R. Morton, undated

  • Box 2, item 133
Later became a parking lot opposite the Esplanade. Then the Greyhound Bus Company used it for a terminal. The property was then purchased by the City of Lexington to erect a jail.
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Ashland, home of Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 2, item 134
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Unknown house, undated

  • Box 2, item 135
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Home of Dr. John W. Peck, undated

  • Box 2, item 136
The Kaiser family formerly lived at this site for many years, after Kaiser's death it was occupied by the Christian Church.
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Residence of J. Hull Davis, undated

  • Box 2, item 137
On East Third Street opposite Transylvania. Davis was the manager of the Phoenix Hotel and Mayor of Lexington.
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The Hayman House at South Spring at Vine, undated

  • Box 2, item 138
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Originally an antique shop, now is the Bank of the Bluegrass, undated

  • Box 2, item 139
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Joel and Alice Higgin's home at 600 East High Street, undated

  • Box 2, item 140
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Charlie McCarthy [curbside in wagon] with family in background in front of family home, undated

  • Box 2, item 141
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Home originally owned by R. Leslie Combs, undated

  • Box 2, item 142
Later converted into the Gem Hotel and demolished for the Lafayette Hotel, is presently the site of the Kentucky Central Life Insurance Building.
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Home of Robert S. Todd, father of Mary Todd Lincoln, undated

  • Box 2, item 143
Abraham Lincoln stayed here three days enroute to serve his term in Congress. This building has caused much controversy concerning making it a State Shrine. it is located at 574 West Main.
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Slave house next to Wendover Stables on west side of Limestone Street, undated

  • Box 2, item 144
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Unknown building, undated

  • Box 2, item 145
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Pullams Slave Jail, 149 North Broadway, undated

  • Box 2, item 146
Demolished in 1901 to make room for The Elks Club, This building was erected by Mathias Shyrock, father of Gideon Shyrock who was architecht of Morrison Chapel and other famous buildings in Central Kentucky. It was used by slavers Pullman, Blackwell, Murphy, and others. Felix Murphy, son-in-law of Blackwell, later moved to Nelson County and became the county judge in 1864. General O.Q. Howard and staff used this building as headquarters for the Freedoms Bureau and afterwards was used by Dr. J.A. Clyle, Dr. Stuky and other physicians. When this building was destroyed, the capstone was found cut on the south side of the building. It was removed by Dick Webb and placed on the building on East Main opposite Rose Street, which is now Mamouth Garage.
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[Right (a)] One of the first homes in Lexington - owned by the Geohagans; [Left (b)] J.H. Hardesty Store - sold various sundries as indicated by the signs, undated

  • Box 2, item 147
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Home last owned by Nettie Arnold, located at 121 Forest Ave, undated

  • Box 2, item 148
Has subsequently been torn down.
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Unknown home, undated

  • Box 2, item 149
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216 North Broadway, undated

  • Box 2, item 150
Formerly used as a Boy's School by Professor Merrick, and later used as the I.O.O.F. Temple, is now being used by the Women's CLub of Central Kentucky.
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The McCulla residence, facing West High Street and the First Methodist Church, undated

  • Box 2, item 151
Was a weatherboarded log cabin, built in 1794. There was a great controversy between the local preservation groups and the Urban renewal which continued for quite some time. It was eventually torn down, due to urban renewal.
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Location of the Slave Jail on the south side of West Short Street at 510, undated

  • Box 2, item 152
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Home of Susan Shelby, daughter of Isaac Shelby - first governor of Kentucky, on South Limestone across from the University of Kentucky, undated

  • Box 2, item 153
Later owned by a U.K. Professor Miller and turned into a fraternity house. It was torn down and the Theological Seminary was built on the property. Interestingly enough, there is a cave under the property, which came out on Rose Street on the property of M.J. Crutch, who was superintendent of the buildings at U.K. Later, the cave was sealed off.
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353 South Mill Street, undated

  • Box 2, item 154
Owned in 1902 by John W. Gunn, who was a civil engineer. The house was also occupied by William and Mary Gunn. In the 1928 directory, Mr. Gunn was listed as the only occupant in the house. He was still living there in 1945. In 1968, the property was owned by Surene Divine. In 1970, Keith Sleter lived there. In 1971 the directory stated that Paul Guthrie lived there.
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Birthplace of Mrs. Leslie Carter, famous stage actress , undated

  • Box 2, item 155
Leslie Carter, born Carolyn Louise Dudley on June 10, 1863.
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Home of Dr. J.S. Wilson, undated

  • Box 2, item 156
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Both homes formerly owned by Dr. Dudley, undated

  • Box 2, item 157
The building on the left was his residence and the one on the right was used as his office. It is said that he kept his cadavers in the basement. His home was purchased by William Temple Withers, who in October of 1881 entertained King Kalakaua of the Sandwich Islands, the first foreign sovereign to visit Lexington. The Embassy Club, which opened the night prohibition on beer was lifted, was the next occupant. When the club closed, it was bought by the Thoroughbred Record, the present owner. The little house now, Rebel's Rest Antique Shop, operated by Mr. and Mrs. Bert Halbert.
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Home of Mrs. Bell on East Main, undated

  • Box 2, item 158-159
East Main is now the Esplanade, the home was later used by Dr. Stockdell, and then was later the inital effort of what later became the Central Christian Church. The building on the left was the O'Day Plumbing Company which was one of Lexington's leading plumbers.
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O'Day Plumbing Company, on Esplanade next door to the Bell home, undated

  • Box 2, item 160
Erected in 1850, by Professor Beverly Hicks for a Boy's School, he then used it for his residence when he retired. It was located on the Northeast side of Main Street between Walnut and Deweese Streets, it was also used for many years as a slave jail by visiting dealers, and is now the sit of business buildings.
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Old house on Tucker Street was at rear of the Main Street Baptist Church which faced the Robert S. Todd home, undated

  • Box 2, item 161
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The Meadows, former home of the Warfields, Ashers, Magoffins, and Stolls; located on East Loudon Ave, undated

  • Box 2, item 163
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View of unknown house from across the lawn, undated

  • Box 2, item 164
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Cheapside looking east on Main - Phoenix Hotel in the background, undated

  • Box 2, item 165
The Fayette National Bank, later the First Security National Bank and Trust Co., and now used for offices, is shown from a view looking east toward Cheapside and Upper Street.
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Tintype taken when the Herald-Leader building on the corner of Short and Market was a furniture store, undated

  • Box 2, item 166
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Hanging of William Barker at the Fayette County Court House, 1858 July 10

  • Box 2, item 167
While being taken to jail, Barker killed the Lexington City Marshall. Quickly an infuriated crowd rushed Barker from the jail to the Fayette County Court House where they hanged him from a second story window.
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Tintype of City National Bank, Berkley and Murphy Offices, Union and Harrison House, and Apostolic Times News and Job Printing Office, 1885

  • Box 2, item 168
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Monument to William T. Berry, on corner of Upper and Main Street in the courthouse yard, undated

  • Box 2, item 169
During the construction of the present courthouse this monument disappeared and was never found.
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Monument and burial site of Isaac Shelby, first governor of Kentucky, undated

  • Box 2, item 170
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Picture of portrait of King Solomon by S.S. Price, undated

  • Box 2, item 171
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Gravesite of William King Solomon, hero of the Cholera epidemic, undated

  • Box 2, item 172
He dug graves for the victims after being sold as a slave. Solomon, who died in 1854 at the age of 79, was buried near the entrance of the Lexington Cemetery. His casket, which was considered the finest in Lexington, was furnished by the community.
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Monument for King Solomon, undated

  • Box 2, item 173
Solomon's monument cost $287.00. It was acquired cheaply because someone who ordered it defaulted on payment. The money for it was partly raised by entertainments in the auditorium in Woodland Park. Group identified from left to right: John G, Cramer, Secretary of the Board of Commerce, James Nicol, Superintendent of the Cemetery, John Skain, Mayor, Kathleen Mulligan, Stanley Milward, a Republican leader, Governor AUgustus E. Wilson, Mrs W.R. Milward, unknown woman, General S.W. Price (totally blind), John Wilson Townsend, Samuel M. Wilson, the little boy is Willoughby Mulligan, Mrs. James H. Mulligan, Woodfor W. Longmore, city clerk of Frankfort (his father was clerk of the Court of Appeals for 24 years and a distinguished confederate soldier), Judge James H. Mulligan.
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Busy street scene, undated

  • Box 2, item 174
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Aerial view of Main Street, undated

  • Box 2, item 175
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Street scene during streetcar strike of 1913, 1913 May

  • Box 2, item 176
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Horse drawn wagons carting tobacco on sticks on South Broadway, just below the railroad tracks, undated

  • Box 2, item 177
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California Fruit Store at the northeast corner of Main and Limestone, 1913 May

  • Box 2, item 178
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Home of Dr. Fred Ridgley, located on Market at Second Street, undated

  • Box 2, item 179
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Original home of D.C. Goodloe, located on Linden Walk, undated

  • Box 2, item 180
This house was later used at the St. Joseph Hospital. At one time it was the KA Fraternity house. It is now the Dagley home, located on Linden Walk.
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If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

For all other questions, contact us at: https://libraries.uky.edu/ContactSCRC.

Researchers are required to have an SCRC Researcher Account in order to request or order digital copies of materials. Research Account set-up and use instructions can be found at: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCRCaccount

If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

For all other questions, contact us at: https://libraries.uky.edu/ContactSCRC.

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