Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers

Abstract

The Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers (dated 1811-1985, undated; 12.4 cubic feet; 30 boxes) comprise correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, and ephemera, which document the families' daily life, economic influence, and personal opinions primarily during the 19th century.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers
Extent
12.6 Cubic Feet
Subjects
Decedents' estates -- Kentucky.
Families -- Kentucky -- History -- 19th century
Families -- Kentucky -- History -- 20th century
Letters.
Plantations -- Kentucky.
Plantation life -- Louisiana.
Plantation owners.
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
Slavery -- Kentucky.
Slavery -- United States.
Arrangement
Collection is arranged into four series by subject and format: Duncan family; Foster family; Gibson family; Assorted manuscripts, photographs, and printed materials.
Finding Aid Author
Sarah Mackenzie Wade and Ida Lucille Sell
Preferred Citation
2017ms056 : [identification of item], Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers, 1811-1985, undated, University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
The Duncan and Gibson families were prominent families of Kentucky and Louisiana during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Foster family had roots in Kentucky, yet gained prominence through the timber industry of Minnesota and Washington during the late nineteenth century.
Daughter of Lexington lawyer and hemp manufacturer, Henry Timberlake Duncan (1800-1880), Mary Duncan (1838-1910) married Col. Nathaniel Hart Gibson (1835-1904). Her husband, Nathaniel Hart Gibson, commonly referred to as Hart, served for the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. Hart's father, Tobias Gibson, Sr. (1800-1872), was one of the leading cotton and sugar planters of the Mississippi Valley but made Lexington, Ky. his principal residence. Hart's brother, Randall Lee Gibson (1832-1892) served as a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator for Louisiana after his time as Confederate Brigadier General during the United States Civil War. Both the Duncan and Gibson families owned slaves in Kentucky and Louisiana leading up to the Civil War. Mary Duncan and Col. Nathaniel Hart Gibson's daughter, Elizabeth Dunster Gibson (d. 1926) married Harrison Gardner Foster (d. 1940). Harrison's father, Addison Gardner Foster (1837-1917), was a successful business owner of timber and coal companies in Minnesota and Washington. He served in the United States Senate for Washington State from 1899-1905.
Scope and Content
The Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers (dated 1811-1985, undated; 12.4 cubic feet; 30 boxes) comprise correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, and ephemera, which document the families' daily life, economic influence, and personal opinions primarily during the 19th century. A large part of the collection consists of correspondence to Colonel Nathaniel Hart Gibson, Mary Duncan Gibson, Henry Timberlake Duncan, Tobias Gibson, Sr., and their relatives during the mid to late nineteenth century when they primarily resided in Lexington, Kentucky. Letters in the collection discuss significant issues of the time, such as slavery, the Civil War, and reconstruction. Letters by Tobias Gibson, Sr., a successful sugar plantation owner in Louisiana, discuss moving slaves from Kentucky to Louisiana right before the Civil War as well as contempt for President Abraham Lincoln. Correspondence between brothers, Nathaniel Hart Gibson, known as Hart, and Senator Randall Lee Gibson, include negative reactions to the role of African-Americans after the Civil War. Letters to and from Mary Duncan Gibson primarily discuss family matters, especially among the Foster side of the family, who resided in Minnesota and Washington state near the turn of the twentieth century. Notable items include the plans and deed records for Ingleside manor, the large Lexington estate purchased by Nathaniel Hart and Mary Duncan Gibson in 1879 and given to their descendants upon Mary's death in 1910 and the handwritten account of John Hunt Morgan's Raid into Kentucky.

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Conditions Governing Access Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
The physical rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.

Contents of the Collection

Duncan family, 1828-1902, undated

The Duncan family series comprises the personal papers of Henry T. Duncan as well as his relatives and ancestors. These relations include Elizabeth Pyke, Stephen Duncan, Henry T. Duncan Jr., Lily Duncan, and Mary Duncan. The majority of the series is correspondence and business papers. A significant portion of the correspondence consists of letters between Henry T. Duncan and his second cousin, Stephen Duncan. Henry and Stephen primarily discuss business in their letters. For instance, in 1840 Stephen Duncan wrote Henry Duncan about an order for Henry Clay cordage damaged during a tornado in Natchez on May 7th. Henry and Stephen also discussed politics; tariffs on foreign fiber, cordage, and cotton bagging; and slavery. Stephen Duncan (1787-1867), second cousin of Henry T. Duncan, was the wealthiest cotton planter in the South prior to the US Civil War and the second largest slave owner in the country. He owned plantations throughout Louisiana and Mississippi. Henry and Stephen were partners in the sale and transportation of cordage and bagging manufactured in Kentucky and sold in support of cotton plantations. Stephen Duncan opposed the Confederacy and relocated to New York City in 1863.

Family correspondence, 1837-1902, undated

Ellen Duncan Voorhies letters, 1856-1870, undated

  • Box 4, folder 9
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to her husband, Henry T. Duncan, undated

  • Box 4, folder 10
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to her daughter, Mary Duncan, 1854-1855

  • Box 4, folder 11
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to her daughter, Mary Duncan, 1856-1860, undated

  • Box 4, folder 12
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to Hart Gibson, undated

  • Box 4, folder 13
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan incoming correspondence, 1844-1870, undated

  • Box 4, folder 14
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Elizabeth (Lily) Duncan to Hart Gibson, 1864

  • Box 4, folder 15
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Lily Duncan to her sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1854, 1892, undated

  • Box 5, folder 8
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Lily Duncan incoming correspondence, 1874-1879, undated

  • Box 5, folder 9
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Lily Duncan financial documents, 1883-1902

  • Box 5, folder 10
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Lily Duncan, Coney Island Jockey Club entry forms, 1892-1895

  • Box 5, folder 11
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Lily Duncan, 1857-1858

  • Box 4, folder 16
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1837, 1854

  • Box 4, folder 17
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1855

  • Box 5, folder 1
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1856-1859, undated

  • Box 5, folder 2
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his parents, 1857-1864, undated

  • Box 5, folder 3
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to Hart Gibson, 1848

  • Box 5, folder 4
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. incoming correspondence, 1863, 1871

  • Box 5, folder 5
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. signed check, circa 1870

  • Box 5, folder 6
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[Henry T. Duncan, Jr.?] letter fragment, undated

  • Box 5, folder 7
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Mary Duncan to Mr. Duncan, undated

  • Box 5, folder 12
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Jenkins family correspondence, 1843-1872

  • Box 25, folder 21
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Toulina Johnson to mother (Harriet Johnson), undated

  • Box 25, folder 22
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Henry T. Duncan, 1828-1884, undated

Correspondence, 1836-1884, undated

Incoming, 1840-1881, undated

Duncan family letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1842-1866, undated

  • Box 1, folder 6
This folder contains family letters written to Henry T. Duncan. It includes a letter written to Duncan from his cousin Rebecca Turley (July 5, 1849) talking about various cholera epidemics in Lexington and St. Louis. One letter (July 17, [1862]) from Mary Seargent Duncan, the wife of Henry P. Duncan (1823-1979), describes the destruction of family plantations in Mississippi during the Civil War. A letter from Henry Duncan, Jr. (April 19, 1863) includes a clipping announcing that a violation of General Orders no. 47, prohibiting persons from dealing in Confederate money, will be dealt with in the provisions of that order.
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Timberlake family letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1845-1872

  • Box 1, folder 7
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James Erwin letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1841-1842

  • Box 1, folder 8
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Mary Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, undated

  • Box 25, folder 19
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David Sayre letter to Henry T. Duncan, 1862 March 3

  • Box 25, folder 20
Requests Duncan's assistance in obtaining appointments to military academies. In his post script he states, I hope the President will release Governor Morehead.
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1839-1841

  • Box 1, folder 9
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1842-1843

  • Box 1, folder 10
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1844-1849

  • Box 1, folder 11
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1851-1859

  • Box 1, folder 12
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1860-1862

  • Box 2, folder 1
Folder includes a letter from H.H. Timberlake, a member of Duncan's mother's family, to Henry T. Duncan (December 6, 1861) in which he questions Abraham Lincoln and Secretary Cameron's views on slavery and its impact on Kentuckians who supported the government as their patriotic and holy duty of crushing out rebellion, and restoring the constitution and enforcement of the laws. Furthermore, Timberlake speculates, if a crusade against the institution of slavery is to be the leading policy of the administration will Kentucky submit or spurn such an alliance? Folder also includes a letter from Colonel Charles Anderson about horses in Kentucky during the Civil War. He is seeking a black thoroughbred stallion and notes in the letter If Morgan (John Hunt) has not made off with him, the horse is I think somewhere about you here.
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1863

  • Box 2, folder 2
Folder contains business and personal letters sent to Duncan. It includes a letter from Charles [Burick?] considering speculating on Confederate currency in New Orleans (January 7, 1863).
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1864

  • Box 2, folder 3
Contains a letter written by General Ablin F. Schoepf (1822-1886) the commandant of Fort Delaware where Hart Gibson was incarcerated during the Civil War. Schoepf mentions a visit made by Duncan's daughters and references Hart Gibson saying I am only sorry that I cannot enjoy his company as much as I want if our military creed was the same.
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1865-1870

  • Box 2, folder 4
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1874-1881

  • Box 2, folder 5
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, undated

  • Box 2, folder 6
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Mary Duncan Barr letters to her brother, Henry T. Duncan, 1852-1859

  • Box 5, folder 13
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Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1840

  • Box 5, folder 14
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In May 1840, Dr. Duncan writes: Major Gibson's bagging has not yet arrived at Alexander's Landing and Mr. Clay's cordage was damaged by being exposed to 14 hours of rain. A tornado hit Natchez, Mississippi, on May 7, 1840, killing 369 people. The May 14, 1840, letter contains more descriptions of the tornado.
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Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1841-1842

  • Box 5, folder 15
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In a letter written in September 1842, Duncan, a Whig but not a fan of Henry Clay, discusses Clay's Tariff, which restored or placed new import taxes on foreign fiber, cordage, and cotton bagging. He writes in an August 22, 1842, letter, if Congress adjourns, without passing a revenue bill, the fate of the Whig Party is especially sealed. -as it would well be. I am persuaded that the more moderate and reflecting will secede. While the more immediately interested in the protection policy, will be open to and opponents. I think nothing can justify- or even excuse the Whigs.
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Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1843-1844

  • Box 5, folder 16
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In an April 21, 1843, letter Duncan writes, I have a letter from Mr. Butler of the 15th Inst. in which he proposes to sell to me his Caillou place-for $80,000. Duncan then proceeds to the weigh the pros and cons of buying a sugar plantation at that price and provides a primer on plantation finance. He concludes this portion of the letter with: Ellis & Battle have a very desirable plantation on Terrebonne which they are always anxious to sell. He goes on to say that they would take $60,000 in cash for it. On October 30, 1843, Duncan writes, The drumbeats for Mr. [Henry] Clay could not be better. I wish most sincerely he would not go to N. Carolina or anywhere else till the election is done. And I also wish he would avoid all occasions, (and) the subject of a bank of the U.S. On November 23, 1844, Duncan laments the election of James K. Polk as president, writing The long agony is over and J.K. Polk is President! Well, it is hard - very hard to believe. He is a man of mystification to us...I have made up my mind (to) never again cast my vote for President.
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Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1845-1849

  • Box 5, folder 17
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In a letter written on April 18, 1847, Duncan discusses his views on an end to slavery, I have no doubt you will in your situation, provide for a general, but gradual, emancipation of the slaves in your state. If I were a property holder, say even a slave holder, in the state, I would not object to this. Provided it was gradual, for I am sure it will displace the value of all other property in the state. He also writes about the presidential election of 1848. In a letter written on August 8, 1848, he states that The experience of the last 9 months has completely satisfied me that there exists no where, so selfish a set of demagogues, as is to be gleaned among those identified as our first statesmen - and those being first in the [?], I would place Mr. Clay, and Mr. Webster and Mr. Van Buren. He also defends General Zachary Taylor, writing that You speak of Gen. Taylor as 'a man o fno principles.' This is unjust and I suspect very untrue.
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Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1861-1864, undated

  • Box 5, folder 18
Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan written during the Civil War reflect on politics as well as the economic cost of the war. In 1863, Duncan moved to New York City and writes to Henry T. Duncan a long letter (December 1, 1863) discussing the losses on his sugar and cotton plantations in terms of property and human. He writes I brought nothing from the south, but the proceeds of the sale of our plate...I was glad enough to have the means of getting away with life. He provides the terms of the emancipation of his slaves (without compensation) and states that he does not believe he will live to see the Union restored. In a letter written on February 16, 1864, Duncan writes that his son, Henry, and his wife narrowly escaped from their home on board a steamboat after guerillas threatened to hang him. Since I wrote you last, the Federal Army, and the [?], have completely gutted my two plantations.
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Daniel Duncan letter to his father, Henry T. Duncan, 1841 February 11

  • Box 4, folder 8
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Outgoing, 1848-1872

Henry T. Duncan letters to his daughter, Lily, 1870

  • Box 1, folder 1
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Henry T. Duncan letters to his daughter, Mary, 1848-1872

  • Box 1, folder 2
Letters from Henry T. Duncan to his daughter Mary Duncan, later Gibson. His letters discuss school, her spending habits, and family and business news. In one he sends her specimens from Mammoth Cave including fish eyes (1855). In another he says You will see that I am sojourning for several days at my bachelor establishment in Bourbon with no company but the overseer and 2 Irish laborers engaged in building stone fences.
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Henry T. Duncan letters to his son, 1856

  • Box 1, folder 3
Letters from Henry T. Duncan to his son Henry T. Duncan, Jr. The folder includes a letter written on June 12, 1856, in which he cautions his son against openly discussing the political situations surrounding the Charles Sumner and Kansas controversies.
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Henry T. Duncan letters to Hart Gibson, 1840, 1864

  • Box 1, folder 4
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Letters written by Henry T. Duncan, 1859, 1861

  • Box 1, folder 5
Folder contains three letters written by Henry T. Duncan. Two of the letters were written to Brigadier General Jeremiah T. Boyle (1818-1871) who was the military commander of Kentucky during 1863. In the letter written on June 30, 1863, Duncan writes Boyle concerning the slaves and property owned by his son-in-law Hart Gibson. Nine of Hart Gibson's slaves were taken in the public works and not returned. In the second letter to Boyle, written on July 11, 1863, Duncan writes on behalf of Thomas Wallace, who was taken prisoner near Perryville. Additionally, he mentions Hart Gibson's slaves from the first letter. Boyle wrote a reply on the verso, saying it is improper for Boyle to help Wallace. The last letter was written by Duncan to an unidentified Doctor on May 28, 1859. It refers to a published account of an altercation between General Leslie Combs and Henry T. Duncan. Duncan refers to the article as utterly destitute of truth and such a perversion of the facts. The letter give Duncan's account in detail.
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By subject, 1836-1884, undated

Architecture letters, 1842-1845, 1863

  • Box 2, folder 7
File contains letters relating to architecture and buildings. it includes a letter from architect John McMurtry to Henry T. Duncan, June 20, 1842, concerning borrowing money to pay off other debts.
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Crops letters, 1859, 1862

  • Box 2, folder 8
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Domestic letters, 1841-1867

  • Box 2, folder 9
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Horses and other livestock letters, 1859-1865, undated

  • Box 2, folder 10
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Slavery letters, 1844-1884, undated

  • Box 3, folder 1
This file contains letters and documents relating to slaves owned by Henry T. Duncan or offered to him for sale. Several of the letters describe individual slaves and their health in detail. Two letters written on the same day [April 29, ?] by John Bell Swain talk about the capture of a runaway slave. Correspondants include C. Kelly, Anna des Cognets, E. Gills, I.F. Hall, James McRae, Thomas C. Gilroy, and William A. Gorham. The folder also includes a letter from O. Ferriss, of the U.S. Treasury Department, to Hart Gibson (January 11, 1884), who is attempting to locate information on Peter Bruce and Chloe, former slaves of Henry T. Duncan, Hart's deceased father-in-law.
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William H. Pope and Company letters, 1836-1859

  • Box 3, folder 2
The William H. Pope & Co. (Louisville, Ky.) advertised bagging, bale rope, bagging, and slave clothing for sale. There are 21 letters from Pope or his employees to Duncan. They provide insight into how Duncan marketed his hemp. William Hamilton Pope (1803-1867) was a Harvard graduate (1817-1821), attorney, and later president of William H. Pope & Co. In 1832, he became president of the Bank of Kentucky (1837-1840). His home, later known as Bonny Castle Place, was built during the period 1825-1835 upon his father's estate. Pope's company also dealt in slaves.
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Letters about Henry T. Duncan, 1844, 1862

  • Box 3, folder 3
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Files and financial documents, 1828-1879, undated

Account sheets, 1839-1843, 1864

  • Box 28, folder 2
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Architecture, 1839-1859

  • Box 3, folder 4
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Articles of partnership with Samuel Pyke, 1828

  • Box 3, folder 5
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Handwritten recipes, undated

  • Box 3, folder 6
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Checks, 1858-1859, 1878

  • Box 3, folder 7
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Deeds, 1835-1856, undated

  • Box 3, folder 8
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Deeds, 1842-1865

  • Box 30, folder 1
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Deeds and agreements, 1857-1877

  • Box 3, folder 9
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Domestic accounts, 1840-1841

  • Box 28, folder 3
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Domestic accounts and receipts, 1841-1867

  • Box 3, folder 10
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Draft grant to the Covington and Lexington Rail Road Company, 1852 June

  • Box 3, folder 11
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Financial report, undated

  • Box 3, folder 12
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Hemp sales and shipments, 1834-1862, undated

  • Box 3, folder 13
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Henry Clay monument, 1854-1874, undated

  • Box 3, folder 14
Henry T. Duncan was the chairman of a committee to raise money to create a monument to statesman Henry Clay.
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John McMurtry account sheets, 1841-1842

  • Box 28, folder 4
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John McMurtry account sheets, 1841-1843

  • Box 3, folder 15
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Kentucky bagging and rope accounts, 1837-1838

  • Box 28, folder 10
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Land surveys, 1845, undated

  • Box 3, folder 16
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Lexington Cemetery, 1843-1867, undated

  • Box 3, folder 17
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List of thoroughbred colts and fillies, 1878

  • Box 3, folder 18
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The Necessity of Hard Study , undated

  • Box 3, folder 19
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Northern Bank of Kentucky, 1850-1878, undated

  • Box 4, folder 1
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Receipts and accounts, 1839-1849

  • Box 4, folder 2
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Receipts and accounts, 1852-1863

  • Box 4, folder 3
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Receipts and accounts, 1864-1867

  • Box 4, folder 4
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Receipts and accounts, 1870-1879, undated

  • Box 4, folder 5
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Samuel Pyke accounts, 1841

  • Box 3, folder 20
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State of Louisiana, 1842, 1854

  • Box 3, folder 21
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Travel pass, 1862 September 12

  • Box 3, folder 22
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Valuable papers , 1866-1877, undated

  • Box 4, folder 6
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Will, 1859 January 25

  • Box 4, folder 7
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Foster family, 1865-1985, undated

The Foster family series comprises the papers of Hart Gibson Foster and his mother, Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, as well as Foster family relatives including Harrison Gardner, Addison Gardner Foster, Florence Jones Vining, and Martha Ann Weatherbee Foster. The series also contains assorted legal, genealogical, military records and printed materials. Hart Gibson Foster (1890-1976) was the grandson of Nathaniel Hart and Mary Gibson. His papers primarily document Foster's early education at Philips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts and at Yale University; his business activities in the cement pipe industry; his career in the U.S. Army (WWI and WWII); and his work in the oil and gas industry, banking, real estate, and farming. There are also files pertaining to Foster's wife, Florence Jones Vining. During the 1930s, Vining served in the Federal Housing Commission and in the U.S. Department of the Interior. Correspondents of interest in this portion of the collection include Vice President Alben Barkley, General George Duncan, Chief Justice Fred Vinson, Senator M.M. Logan, congressional representatives Emmet O'Neal and Edward O'Neill, and Louisville Courier-Journal editor Mark Etheridge. The Foster family became connected to the Gibson family when Harrison G. Foster married Elizabeth Dunster Duncan Gibson in 1889. The family originally settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts in 1638, but later Harrison G. Foster along with his mother, Martha Wetherbee, and father, Addison G. Foster, moved to St. Paul, Minnesota. From Minnesota, Harrison G. Foster and his wife and eldest son, Hart G. Foster, moved to Tacoma, Washington in 1890. In 1901, the Foster family moved back to Minnesota where they remained until circa 1917 when the family moved to Lexington, Ky.

Foster family letters and documents, 1889-1940, undated

Addison Gardner Foster telegraph, 1890

  • Box 6, folder 1
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Addison Gardner Foster clipping, 1903

  • Box 6, folder 2
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Addison Gardner Foster II letters to brother, Hart Gibson Foster, 1907-1923, undated

  • Box 6, folder 3-6
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Addison Gardner Foster II letters to mother, 1911 June 1

  • Box 6, folder 7
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Addison Gardner Foster II letters from Sonny, 1930-1931

  • Box 6, folder 8
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Addison Gardner II envelope from American Consular Service, undated

  • Box 6, folder 9
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Everett W. Foster clipping, 1927

  • Box 7, folder 6
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Harrison Gardner Foster agreements and correspondence, 1892-1940, undated

  • Box 7, folder 7-8
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Harrison Gardner Foster photographs, undated

  • Box 7, folder 9
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Harrison Gardner Foster clippings, 1939-1940, undated

  • Box 29, folder 9
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Harrison Gardner Foster clippings, 1909-1940, undated

  • Box 7, folder 16
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Martha Foster letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1889, 1898

  • Box 7, folder 10
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Martha Ann Weatherbee Foster US President Inauguration invitation, 1913

  • Box 7, folder 11
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Francis Weatherbee albumen print, undated

  • Box 7, folder 12
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1869-1939, undated

Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her brothers, Duncan (Buddie) and Hart Gibson, 1869, 1877

  • Box 6, folder 10
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her aunt, Lily Duncan, 1877

  • Box 6, folder 11
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her father, Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1877, 1900

  • Box 6, folder 12
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her mother, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1877-1886

  • Box 6, folder 13
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her sister, Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson, 1877, undated

  • Box 6, folder 14
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her mother, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1891-1896, undated

  • Box 6, folder 15
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster estate forms, 1922-1930

  • Box 6, folder 16
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster estate agreements, 1927

  • Box 7, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster estate bills and receipts, 1901-1928, undated

  • Box 7, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster newspaper clippings, 1926, undated

  • Box 7, folder 3
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Correspondence about Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1889-1926

  • Box 7, folder 4
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Elizabeth Dunster Duncan Foster Pettit clippings, 1939, undated

  • Box 7, folder 5
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Hart Gibson Foster, 1892-1985, undated

From Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1907-1936, undated

Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, undated

  • Box 7, folder 13
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907 January-October

  • Box 7, folder 14
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907 October-December

  • Box 7, folder 15
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 January-March

  • Box 8, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 April-June

  • Box 8, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 September-November

  • Box 8, folder 3
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 January

  • Box 8, folder 4
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 March-April

  • Box 8, folder 5
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 May-December

  • Box 8, folder 6
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1910 May-August

  • Box 8, folder 7
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1910 September-November

  • Box 8, folder 8
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1911

  • Box 8, folder 9
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1912 January-May

  • Box 9, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1912 June-December

  • Box 9, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1913 January-May

  • Box 9, folder 3
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1913 May-November

  • Box 9, folder 4
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1914

  • Box 9, folder 5
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1915

  • Box 9, folder 6
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 January-June

  • Box 9, folder 7
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 August-September

  • Box 10, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 October-December

  • Box 10, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916-1925

  • Box 10, folder 3
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, undated

  • Box 10, folder 4
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Hart Gibson Foster letters to his mother, Elizabeth Dunster Gibson, 1913-1936

  • Box 13, folder 7
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From Harrison Gardner Foster, 1892-1940, undated

Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1892, 1895

  • Box 10, folder 5
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1906-1907

  • Box 10, folder 6
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907 October-November

  • Box 10, folder 7
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907 December

  • Box 10, folder 8
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 January-March

  • Box 10, folder 9
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 March-April

  • Box 10, folder 10
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 April-June

  • Box 11, folder 1
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 September-December

  • Box 11, folder 2
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 January-October

  • Box 11, folder 3
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1910-1913

  • Box 11, folder 4
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1914

  • Box 11, folder 5
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1915

  • Box 11, folder 6
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 January

  • Box 11, folder 7
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 February-March

  • Box 11, folder 8
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 April-June

  • Box 12, folder 1
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916 August-October

  • Box 12, folder 2
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916-1917

  • Box 12, folder 3
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1919-1923

  • Box 12, folder 4
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Harrison Gardner Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1924-1940, undated

  • Box 12, folder 5
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Incoming, 1907-1985, undated

Al Ranney letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907-1910

  • Box 12, folder 6
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Duncan Dunster Foster Pettit letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908-1940, undated

  • Box 12, folder 7
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Dunster E. Pettit letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1963-1985, undated

  • Box 12, folder 8
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Mrs. Johnson N. Camden letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908, 1912

  • Box 12, folder 9
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Louisiana Breckinridge Gibson letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907-1935

  • Box 12, folder 10
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Martha W. Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908-1916

  • Box 12, folder 11
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Mary Duncan Gibson letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907-1908

  • Box 12, folder 12
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Stuart Smith letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908-1914

  • Box 12, folder 13
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Stuart Smith letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1914-1917

  • Box 13, folder 1
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Letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907-1909

  • Box 13, folder 2
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Letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1910-1913

  • Box 13, folder 3
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Letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1914-1915

  • Box 13, folder 4
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Letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1916-1940, undated

  • Box 13, folder 5
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Assorted documents, 1865-1985, undated

Business, 1908-1916, 1934

  • Box 13, folder 6
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Biographical information, circa 1946

  • Box 13, folder 8
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Envelopes, 1909-1944, undated

  • Box 13, folder 9
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Financial, 1907, 1919-1953

  • Box 13, folder 10
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Florence Jones Vining, Federal Housing Administration, 1934-1940, undated

  • Box 13, folder 11
Florence Jones Vining, who married Hart G. Foster, served in the women's division of the Federal Housing Commission and was the Commission's national director of women's activities. She directed a program designed to acquaint American women with the provisions of the National Housing Act for financing the improvement and repair of homes, the construction of new ones and the refinancing of existing mortgages. She also worked with the United States Travel Bureau of the Department of the Interior. Her file contains a number of recommendation letters from historical notables including the following: Alben Barkley, M.M. Logan, Emmet O'Neil, Edward O'Neil, Mark Etheridge (Louisville Courier-Journal).
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Foster family genealogy, 1865, undated

  • Box 13, folder 12
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Furniture inventory, Allied Van Lines, 1951

  • Box 14, folder 1
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Geometry proof exam, 1908 May 22

  • Box 14, folder 2
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Harrodsburg, 1932, undated

  • Box 14, folder 3
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Henry Clay Memorial, Ashland dedication, 1950 April 2

  • Box 14, folder 4
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Insurance, 1918

  • Box 14, folder 5
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Invitations and social engagements, 1912-1916, undated

  • Box 14, folder 6
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Jackson Day Dinner program, 1936

  • Box 14, folder 7
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Legal, Hart Gibson et al v. Duncan Gibson et al, 1916

  • Box 14, folder 8
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Legal, Shell Oil Company litigation, 1942-1965, undated

  • Box 14, folder 9
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Legal, Shell Oil Company settlement, 1978-1984, undated

  • Box 14, folder 10
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Legal, Shell Oil Company settlement, 1978-1980

  • Box 28, folder 9
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Manuscript notes, undated

  • Box 14, folder 11
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Map, Menifee County, Kentucky, 1927

  • Box 29, folder 2
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Military, Army-Navy-Air Force Register, 1955 October 15

  • Box 28, folder 8
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Military, army personal history, 1917-1965

  • Box 14, folder 12
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Military, The Bayonet Remembrance Book of Camp Lee, Virginia, 1918

  • Box 14, folder 13
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Military correspondence and bulletin, 1923-1925

  • Box 14, folder 14
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Military diet chart, undated

  • Box 29, folder 3
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Military documents and printed materials, 1917-1959, undated

  • Box 14, folder 15
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Military newspapers, undated?

  • Box 29, folder 4
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Military, Terminal and Picatinny Arsenal, 1946-1948

  • Box 14, folder 16
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Military, War Department envelopes, undated

  • Box 28, folder 10
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Newspaper clippings, 1909-1932, undated

  • Box 14, folder 17
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Newspaper clippings, 1881-1883, 1910-1941, 1972-1985, undated

  • Box 29, folder 5
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Newspaper clippings with correspondence, 1915-1916

  • Box 29, folder 6
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Newspaper clippings from Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1907

  • Box 29, folder 7
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Newspaper clippings from Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1913

  • Box 29, folder 8
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Notes and sketches, 1912, undated

  • Box 14, folder 18
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Permits and identity cards, 1917, 1934-1947, undated

  • Box 14, folder 19
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Personal, 1934, undated

  • Box 14, folder 20
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Phillips Academy, 1908, 1972, undated

  • Box 15, folder 1
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Vigilance Committee ledger, 1917 April-May

  • Box 15, folder 2
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Yale fraternity alumni, undated

  • Box 15, folder 3
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The Cosmopolitan , 1899 March

  • Box 15, folder 4
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Current Literature , 1900 April

  • Box 15, folder 5
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Industrial Research in America article, 1913 September 9

  • Box 15, folder 6
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Kentucky Progress Magazine, vol. 6, no. 6, 1935 Winter

  • Box 15, folder 7
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The National Association for Constitutional Government pamphlet, undated

  • Box 15, folder 8
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The National Cyclopedia of American Biography, volume 1, 1982

  • Box 15, folder 9
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Southern Historical Society Papers, vol. V, no. 3, 1878 March

  • Box 15, folder 10
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Gibson family, 1830-1938, undated

The Gibson family series comprises the personal papers of Col. Nathaniel Hart Gibson, Mary Duncan Gibson and their relatives. The majority of the series consists of correspondence between family members such as Tobias Gibson, Louisiana Hart Gibson, and Randall Lee Gibson. Also included is information concerning the Ingleside estate, copies of newspaper clippings, genealogical information, and assorted papers and printed materials. Letters to and from Gibson family members discuss slavery leading up to and during the Civil War. In 1855, Henry T. Duncan wrote to his daughter, Mary, that she should not mention the slaves in correspondence while attending school in Massachuessets because he feared abolitionists would discover the letters. William Gibson wrote his brother about the impending war and the difficulties of cotton slaves working sugar plantations in 1860. Further, Henry T. Duncan and Preston Gibson wrote letters to members of Gibson family about relocating slaves from Kentucky to Louisiana before the war. After the Civil War, Gibson family letters regard the sale of plantation lands and the freedman's bureau. In 1868, C.R. Greathouse writes to Nathaniel Hart Gibson about the over payment of black teachers by the bureau. The Randall Lee Gibson sub-series consists of letters written to and from Randall Lee Gibson (1832-1892), Nathaniel Hart Gibson's older brother, which document Randall Lee's career as a sugar planter, Confederate officer, U.S. Congressman, and Senator from Louisiana. The Gibson family has ties, through marriage, to several prominent 19th and early 20th century families, particularly the Duncans, Prestons, Pykes, Harts, Timberlakes, Fosters, Van Meters. The Kentucky Gibson family originally came to the state around 1827 when patriarch Tobias Gibson married Louisiana Breckinridge Hart. Tobias Gibson was privately educated in Lexington and even though he maintained several estates in Louisana his primary residence was in Lexington, Ky.

Family correspondence, 1843-1935, undated

Claudius Gibson correspondence, 1858-1861, undated

  • Box 23, folder 20
Claudius Gibson letters to his sister (either Louisiana Hart Gibson or Sarah Thompson Gibson Humphries) consist of a fragment in which he mentions learning about Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry (Oct. 1859), provides a description of Paris, and discusses his attempts to obtain a passage home. Claudius Gibson, a CSA artillery officer, was killed during the Civil War.
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Duncan Gibson correspondence, 1856-1894, 1920

  • Box 23, folder 21
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Hart Gibson, Jr. incoming letters, 1892

  • Box 24, folder 1
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Hart Gibson, Jr. letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1892-1893

  • Box 24, folder 2
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Hart Gibson, Jr. letters to parents and sister, 1892-1899

  • Box 24, folder 3
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Mary Duncan (Gibson) Gibson correspondence, 1935

  • Box 24, folder 4
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McKinley Gibson incoming letters, 1879

  • Box 24, folder 5
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McKinley Gibson incoming letters, undated

  • Box 24, folder 6
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McKinley Gibson letters to Randall Lee Gibson, 1877, 1880

  • Box 24, folder 7
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McKinley Gibson outgoing letters, 1859-1869

  • Box 24, folder 8
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McKinley Gibson outgoing letters, 1870-1879

  • Box 24, folder 9
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McKinley Gibson voter registration, Orleans, Louisiana, 1878 June 29

  • Box 24, folder 22
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Mary Montgomery Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1878

  • Box 24, folder 10
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Mary Montgomery Gibson letters to Louisiana Breckinridge Gibson, 1870 May 29

  • Box 24, folder 11
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Mittie Gibson letters from Florence M. Shelby, 1878

  • Box 24, folder 12
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Montgomery Gibson letters to Hart and Mary Duncan Gibson, 1890-1900

  • Box 24, folder 13
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Randall Lee Gibson, Jr. letters to Hart Gibson, 1895-1900

  • Box 24, folder 14
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Tobias Gibson, Jr. letters to Hart Gibson, 1859-1900

  • Box 24, folder 15-16
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Tobias Gibson, Jr. outgoing letters, 1860-1889

  • Box 24, folder 17
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Unknown Gibson letters to Mrs. William T. Warfield, 1891 March 2

  • Box 24, folder 18
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Joseph Alexander Humphreys incoming letters, 1876

  • Box 24, folder 19
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Joseph Alexander Humphreys letters to Tobias Gibson, 1881 July 28

  • Box 24, folder 20
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Lucy Humphreys outgoing letter (fragment), undated

  • Box 24, folder 21
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Tobias Gibson letter to Sarah Thompson Gibson Humphreys, 1865 July 25

  • Box 25, folder 1
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Sarah Thompson Gibson Humphreys incoming letters, 1865-1878

  • Box 25, folder 2
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Sarah Thompson Gibson Humphreys letter to Louisiana Breckinridge Hart, 1880 October 23

  • Box 25, folder 3
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Sarah Thompson Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1870-1900

  • Box 25, folder 4
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Sarah Thompson Gibson letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1862-1892

  • Box 25, folder 5
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Hart Vance letter to Hart Gibson, 1890 April 23

  • Box 25, folder 6
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Hart Vance letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1878 March 31

  • Box 25, folder 7
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Dr. and Mrs. Morgan Vance letters to Hart and Mary Duncan Gibson, 1878, undated

  • Box 25, folder 8
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Sarah Preston Vance letters to Hart Gibson, 1878-1896, undated

  • Box 25, folder 9
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Sarah Preston Vance letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1877-1878, undated

  • Box 25, folder 10
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Sarah Preston Vance letters to Sarah Thompson Gibson Humphreys, 1871, 1876

  • Box 25, folder 11
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Sarah Preston Vance outgoing letters, 1875-1877

  • Box 25, folder 12
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Voorhies letters to Hart Gibson, 1876-1896, undated

  • Box 25, folder 13
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Mary H. Voorhies letters to Louisiana Breckinridge Gibson, 1843

  • Box 25, folder 14
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William Voorhies letter to Tobias Gibson, 1854 July 27

  • Box 25, folder 15
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William Voorhies outgoing letters, 1861

  • Box 25, folder 16
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Freidrich (Fritz) Johannes Hugo von Engelken letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1905 August 2

  • Box 25, folder 17
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Jeannie Scott letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, undated

  • Box 25, folder 18
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Ingleside, 1896-1932, undated

John McMurtry designed and built the mansion, Ingleside, beginning in 1842, for the industrialist Joseph Bruen. It was completed ten years later at a cost of $29,000. After the Civil War, Colonel J. Watts Kearney, son of General Phil Kearney, purchased Ingleside. After passing through the hands of several families, it was purchased by sisters Lily Dunster Duncan and Mary Duncan Gibson, wife of Hart Gibson, in 1879. The Gibson family owned Ingleside until the early 1930s. This sub-series includes several letters (1893-1930) concerning Ingleside, a plat drawing of the property, newspaper clippings, and legal documents (deeds and mortgages) pertaining to the estate.

Ingelside auction notice, clippings and notes, 1932, undated

  • Box 26, folder 13
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Ingelside correspondence, 1896

  • Box 26, folder 14
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Ingelside deed and release of mortgage, 1930

  • Box 26, folder 15
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Ingelside mortgage agreements, 1928

  • Box 26, folder 16
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Ingelside mortgage real estate bonds, 1926

  • Box 26, folder 17
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Ingelside property records, undated

  • Box 26, folder 18
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Ingelside tour description, 1901

  • Box 26, folder 19
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General plan for Ingleside, undated

  • Box 29, folder 10
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Hart Gibson (Nathaniel Hart), 1830-1916, undated

The Hart Gibson (Nathaniel Hart) subseries contain letters written to and by Gibson as well as other financial and legal material. Notable items include a June 8, 1861, petition signed by 32 persons requesting that Hart represent them as Southern Rights men in the lower house of the next legislature- this was during Kentucky period of neutrality. Another document (August 1861) invites Hart to speak at a peace meeting. One the most significant and valuable items in his papers is a manuscript (11 leaves) in Hart Gibson's hand that details the final days of Morgan's Ohio raid from July 19, 1863, at Buffington Island until Morgan's capture near Lisbon, Ohio on July 27, 1863. Materials found in Hart Gibson's papers from the 1870s and 1880s continued to provide historical surprises. In 1877, Hart Gibson was in Washington, D.C. visiting his brother Randall Lee. There he witnessed Congressman Gibson's role in the disputed Hayes/Tilden election that resulted in the election of Rutherford B. Hayes as president in exchange for the end of reconstruction in Louisiana. He wrote several letters to his wife Mary describing the political situation. Nathaniel Hart Gibson (1835-1904), the husband of Mary Duncan Gibson (1838-1910), was known as Hart, Gibson grew up in Kentucky and Louisiana. During the 1850s, Hart graduated from Yale College, studied law at Harvard and political science and philosophy overseas at Heidelberg University. Upon his return to Kentucky he continued to study law. In 1862, Hart was commissioned a Colonel in General Kirby Smith's cavalry and in 1863 participated in General John Hunt Morgan's Ohio raid. He was captured, incarcerated, and exchanged in 1864. After the war he co-founded The Lexington Daily Press, served in the Kentucky State legislature, served on the board of the state university, and was one of the incorporators of the Confederate Veteran Association.

Correspondence, 1830-1903, undated

Incoming, 1830-1903, undated

William P. Gibson letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1860-1861

  • Box 15, folder 11
In his first letter to his brother Hart, William discusses the possibility of spending time in Kentucky. He also reminds Hart of his promise to send him a Berkshire pig. They have picked their cotton crop and he says, How much less trouble there is in cotton than sugar planting. In his second letter, William reports that heavy rain has played havoc with their preparations for their next cotton crop. He states further that, Pa (Tobias, Sr.) says that this is my last gasp-a big crop or go by the board. Of the coming Civil War, he says that he has learned who will hold some of the offices of the Confederacy. In addition, he states, The talk is that in his management Lincoln means war and that Davis will march an army of fifty thousand men on Washington city if a single blockade takes place. William (1833-1865) was Tobias and Louisiana Hart Gibson's forth child, two years older than Hart. He married Elodie Mary Humphries on July 19, 1855 in St. James, Louisiana (Terrebonne Parish).
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W.E. Terrell letter to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1860 January 21

  • Box 15, folder 12
Written by the overseer at Hartland plantation, in Woodford County, Kentucky. He reports on cribbing corn, moving logs, the health of slaves, and engaging the Irish to raise dirt for your brick.
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C.R. Greathouse letter to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1868 January 16

  • Box 15, folder 13
Greathouse encloses a petition signed by the Woodford County judge and all the justices present at court in relation to a bill introduced by Gibson to use taxes paid by African-Americans to pay for African-American schools. Greathouse claims that the Freedman's Bureau created the schools and employed female teachers imported from Lexington. Greathouse feels the teachers were overpaid and that the schools did not attempt to conform to state school laws.
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Mary Gibson letter to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1864 July 7

  • Box 15, folder 14
Writes to her husband that Charlie Bodley is going to Canada, and cannot stand black troops.
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Mary Gibson letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1869

  • Box 15, folder 15
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Mary Gibson letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1896-1897

  • Box 15, folder 16
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Mary Gibson letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1900-1903

  • Box 15, folder 17
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Preston Gibson letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, undated

  • Box 15, folder 18
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1830

  • Box 15, folder 19
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1853-1859

  • Box 15, folder 20
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1860-1866

  • Box 15, folder 21
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1867-1869

  • Box 15, folder 22
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1870

  • Box 16, folder 1
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1871

  • Box 16, folder 2
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1872-1878

  • Box 16, folder 3
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1880-1889

  • Box 16, folder 4
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1890-1899

  • Box 16, folder 5
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1900-1903

  • Box 16, folder 6
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Letters to Nathaniel Hart Gibson, undated

  • Box 16, folder 7
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Outgoing, 1850-1899, undated

Nathaniel Hart Gibson letters to Mary Gibson, 1863-1899

  • Box 16, folder 8
This file includes a prisoner of war letter from Hart Gibson to his wife Mary Duncan Gibson while he was imprisoned at Fort Delaware during the Civil War. The folder also includes a letter concerning the Compromise of 1877 and the end of Reconstruction. Gibson writes to his wife on March 2, 1877, that the long agony is over and Hayes is counted in. We have entirely secured the practical reorganization of the Nichols government in Louisiana.
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Letters from Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1850-1892, undated

  • Box 16, folder 9
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Assorted, 1840-1916, undated

Broadsides, undated

  • Box 28, folder 5
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson calling card plate, undated

  • Box 17, folder 1
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Calling cards, undated

  • Box 17, folder 2
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Class of Fifty-Five, of Yale College. Secretary's Report. , 1859

  • Box 17, folder 3
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Contracts, 1887-1902, undated

  • Box 17, folder 4
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Envelopes, 1888-1894, undated

  • Box 17, folder 5
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson financial documents, 1840-1916, undated

  • Box 17, folder 6
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Invitations, 1885, undated

  • Box 17, folder 7
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson legal documents, 1860-1877, undated

  • Box 29, folder 1
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson manuscript Civil War narrative and correspondence, 1863-1864, 1896, undated

  • Box 17, folder 8
Manuscript in Hart Gibson's hand detailing the portion of John Hunt Morgan's Ohio Raid in 1863 from his failure to ford the Ohio River at Buffington Island until Morgan's capture near Lisbon, Ohio.
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Newspaper clippings, 1861, undated

  • Box 28, folder 6
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson speeches, 1853, undated

  • Box 17, folder 9
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Steamship ticket, New York and Liverpool, 1865 December

  • Box 17, folder 10
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Tacoma Chamber of Commerce invitation, undated

  • Box 17, folder 11
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Turnpike Company draft bill, 1887

  • Box 17, folder 12
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson Washington and Lee University report cards, 1871

  • Box 28, folder 7
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Western Military Academy, Bland Jones, 1870 April

  • Box 17, folder 13
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Mary Duncan Gibson, 1849-1910, undated

Correspondence, 1849-1906, undated

Incoming, 1849-1906, undated

Hart Gibson letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1874 January 19

  • Box 17, folder 14
Written from Oak Forest, Louisiana, and describes a riot of African-Americans in the Parish, protesting a general reduction in wages from 18 to 13 dollars per month. The rioters wanted no workers to work for the reduced rate. His brother Randall Lee wants Hart to join him in his practice in New Orleans and he asks Mary to consider his proposal arguing that he can't currently pay off his debt where they are now.
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Hart Gibson letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1877 February 20

  • Box 17, folder 15
Written on U.S. House of Representatives stationery from Washington, D.C. Hart is in Washington visiting Randall Lee Gibson. He reports that Lee could not possibly have left Washington to attend a funeral in Kentucky because The Louisiana complications required every moment of his time; seeing the President every day, sending and receiving telegrams and attending the argument before the commission. There has been no such excitement here since 61 ' Of course, Hayes will be counted in but I think there is no doubt that the whole Southern policy of previous Republican administrations will be abandoned.
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Hart Gibson letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1870-1882

  • Box 17, folder 16
Folder contains a letter written on March 2, 1877. Hart writes: The long agony is over and Hayes is counted in. We have entirely secured the practical reorganization of the Nichols government in Louisiana. The chances are that Lee will be elected Senator. The letter refers to the disputed presidential election between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel J. Tilden and the decision by a special electoral congressional commission on the side of Hayes. Southern Democratic support was achieved through agreement to end Reconstruction.
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Henry T. Duncan letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1855 January 18

  • Box 17, folder 17
He cautions Mary against speaking about slavery with anyone while she is at school in Pittsfield, Massachusetts or with sharing her letters. He is afraid they will get in the hands of abolitionists and then published in the press. The latter which will misrepresent an institution, which though bad enough-she graphically misrepresents.
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Tobias Gibson letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1860 November 25

  • Box 17, folder 18
He writes that the slaves sent from Kentucky are doing well, I am out and out for a separate and independent government and people. I loathe the very idea of a further connection with Northern fanatics with their vile abominations of every sort the least of which is their slanders of the truth which we could well disregard.
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1849-1853

  • Box 17, folder 19
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1854

  • Box 17, folder 20-21
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1855

  • Box 17, folder 22
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1855

  • Box 18, folder 1-2
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1856

  • Box 18, folder 3-4
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1857

  • Box 18, folder 5-6
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1858-1859

  • Box 18, folder 7
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1860-1869

  • Box 19, folder 1
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1870-1872

  • Box 19, folder 2
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1873-1876

  • Box 19, folder 3
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1877

  • Box 19, folder 4-5
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1878-1879

  • Box 19, folder 6
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1880-1881

  • Box 19, folder 7
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1882-1885

  • Box 20, folder 1
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1886-1889

  • Box 20, folder 2
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1890-1891

  • Box 20, folder 3
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1892

  • Box 20, folder 4
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1893-1895

  • Box 20, folder 5
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1896-1897

  • Box 20, folder 6
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1898-1899

  • Box 20, folder 7
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1900-1906

  • Box 20, folder 8
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Letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, undated

  • Box 21, folder 1-3
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Martha Wetherbee Foster letter to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1898 September 20

  • Box 21, folder 4
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Outgoing, 1855-1905

Mary Duncan Gibson correspondence with Howard Gibson, 1905

  • Box 21, folder 5
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Mary Duncan Gibson letters to her parents, 1855-1859, undated

  • Box 21, folder 6
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Mary Duncan Gibson letter to Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan, 1860 January 18

  • Box 21, folder 7
She and Hart have just returned from New Orleans. Tell father there was a large sugar plantation fifty miles from New Orleans on the river sold the other day for five hundred thousand dollars-it was bought by Burnside-the same man who has the Preston plantation. His income will now be five hundred thousand a year. He is an old 'back' and has the finest home in N.O. This is certainly the country for making money-and that easily-where one gets 60% of his property and as to slaves-the place is no worse to own them than another-you must not think I am losing my abolition principles-they are the same. Mary refers to the Houmas House mansion begun in 1810 under Wade Hampton I, and completed in 1828 by John and Caroline Preston-his daughter and son-in-law. It was purchased by John Burnside, a native of Belfast, Ireland, in 1857 for one million dollars (not $500,000). The Houmas was the largest slave holding in Louisiana before the Civil War.
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Mary Duncan Gibson letters to Henry Duncan, Jr., 1856

  • Box 21, folder 8
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Mary Duncan Gibson letter to David Sayre, 1855 August 4

  • Box 21, folder 9
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Assorted, 1863-1910, undated

Mary Duncan Gibson bonnet receipt, Tacoma, Washington, 1892 October 18

  • Box 21, folder 10
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Empty envelops and stamps, undated

  • Box 21, folder 11
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Mary Duncan Gibson obituary, Lexington Leader, 1910 May 23

  • Box 21, folder 12
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Mary Duncan Gibson travel pass, 1863 May 22

  • Box 21, folder 13
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson, 1864-1905, undated

Louisiana Breckinridge Hart letter to Hart Gibson, 1892

  • Box 22, folder 8
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letter to Mrs. Hart Gibson (Mary Duncan), 1875

  • Box 22, folder 9
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letters to Mrs. Hart Gibson (Mary Duncan), 1892 January-October

  • Box 22, folder 10
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letters to Mrs. Hart Gibson (Mary Duncan), 1892 November-December

  • Box 22, folder 11
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letters to Mrs. Hart Gibson (Mary Duncan), 1893

  • Box 22, folder 12
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letters to Mrs. Hart Gibson (Mary Duncan), 1896, 1905, undated

  • Box 22, folder 13
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, Jr., 1872, 1891

  • Box 23, folder 1
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letter to Duncan Gibson, 1892

  • Box 23, folder 2
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Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson letters, 1864, 1877, undated

  • Box 23, folder 3
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Invitation to tea to Loulie [Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson], undated

  • Box 23, folder 4
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Tobias Gibson, 1845-1938, undated

This sub-series contains more than sixty-five letters (1855-1871) from Tobias to his son Hart as well as other family members. Some were written while his sons were at Yale and others while they were in Europe. A small group, written in the late 1850s and early 1860s, discusses the problems Kentucky slaves experienced acclimating to a new environment after they were sent to Louisiana by Henry T. Duncan. As the Civil War approached, Tobias' letters were filled with anti-Abraham Lincoln rhetoric. By war's end in 1865, he was still complaining about what he termed the annihilation of labor, military government, government control from Washington, and the need to reinstate state's rights. Aside from the war and politics, topics in Tobias' letters include discussions of plantation crops (sugar cane and cotton) and plantation infrastructure, levees and flooding on the Mississippi, travel, financial affairs, and family matters.

Correspondence, 1849-1871, undated

Letters to Tobias Gibson, 1849-1866, undated

  • Box 21, folder 14
This folder contains many letters from Tobias Gibson, Sr. to the Duncan family including his son's father-in-law Henry T. Duncan and his daughter-in-law Mary Duncan Gibson. He often writes about slaves on the plantation of his son Hart Gibson, the political situation of Kentucky during the Civil War, and Reconstruction in the South.
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Tobias Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1855-1860

  • Box 21, folder 15
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Tobias Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1861, 1863

  • Box 21, folder 16
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Tobias Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1865-1866

  • Box 21, folder 17
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Tobias Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1867-1868

  • Box 21, folder 18
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Tobias Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1869-1870

  • Box 21, folder 19
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Tobias Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1871

  • Box 22, folder 1
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Letters from Tobias Gibson, 1855-1871

  • Box 22, folder 2
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Assorted, 1845-1938

Craig & Elliott account ledger, 1851-1852

  • Box 22, folder 3
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Tobias Gibson checks, 1845

  • Box 22, folder 4
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Tobias Gibson financial statements and receipts, 1845-1887

  • Box 22, folder 5
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Newspaper clipping: Lexington Gibson House, 1938 November 13

  • Box 22, folder 6
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Tobias Gibson Power of Attorney, 1865 August 13

  • Box 22, folder 7
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Randall Lee Gibson, 1855-1896, undated

This sub-series contains materials relating to the most well known member of the Gibson family, Hart's older brother Randall Lee Gibson (1832-1892). It includes a large amount of lettes written to Hart Gibson and other siblings between 1855 and 1883. The majority of letters were written to Randall Lee's brother Hart. These letters document Randall Lee's career as a sugar planter, Confederate officer, U.S. Congressman and Senator from Louisiana, and a founder of Tulane University. Letters between the brothers generated in the 1850s discuss their education at Yale, their travels through Europe, and their initial ventures into plantation life. As the country disintegrates into civil war in the early 1860s, they discuss abolitionists, the presidential election of 1860, and the need to establish a confederate form of government in both Louisiana and Kentucky. Letters that followed the war, took stock of family fortunes and the family's attempts to resume growing cotton, the difficulty in utilizing freed men, Recondstruction government in Louisiana, the election of Rutherford B. Hayes, Randall Lee's law practice and his successful venture into politics, and his marriage to Mary Montgomery.

Correspondence, 1855-1890, undated

Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1855

  • Box 23, folder 5
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1860-1866

  • Box 23, folder 6
This folder contains letters written by Randall Lee during the Civil War period. Notable letters include one written on August 31, 1860, in which Randall Lee provides the names and ages of slaves on his plantation, including 30 of his own and then the slaves owned by Hart who came from Kentucky. He also discusses the health of the slaves from Kentucky. On December 22, 1860, Randall Lee writes about Louisiana's secession convention and the possibility of one in Kentucky, counseling that if Hart wishes to take the lead in this matter you had better begin to lay your plans as soon as possible, to be elected to a convention, taking the southern side as far as you can go. A convention is inevitable in Kentucky, and she must decide to join the North or South. The folder also contains several letters discussing the financial situation of the Gibson family following the end of the Civil War. In a letter dated June 20, 1865, Randall Lee writes about the financial debts of Tobias, Sr., Randall Lee's decision to go into the law, and encourages Hart to seek amnesty as soon as possible. In a letter dated July 27, 1865, Randall Lee writes that Tobias Gibson has gone to New Orleans to confer with officials of the Freedman's Bureau on how he should pay his workers (former slaves). He writes that We are all in favor of white labor and will undertake what you propose; organize companies to introduce Irishmen and their families. This cannot be done immediately as everything is too broken up and there is absolutely no money and no credit at hand.
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1867-1869

  • Box 23, folder 7
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1870-1873

  • Box 23, folder 8
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1874

  • Box 23, folder 9
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1875-1878

  • Box 23, folder 10
This folder includes letters concerning the election of Rutherford B. Hayes, the Compromise of 1877, and the end of Reconstruction. In one letter, written on February 10, 1877, Randall Lee writes that it looks unfavorable for us, but if Tilden is declared elected, we all after so many years of disaster - with luck - must manage to get on the rising tide. You must therefore, without a day's delay, upon the announcement of Tilden come directly here. He promises to help Hart get a position and a living income.
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, 1881-1890

  • Box 23, folder 11
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Hart Gibson, undated

  • Box 23, folder 12
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Sarah Thompson Gibson, 1859-1868

  • Box 23, folder 13
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Randall Lee Gibson letters to Tobias Gibson, 1859-1868

  • Box 23, folder 14
Includes a letter, written on February 11, 1866, discussing Hart Gibson and Randall Lee Gibson's survival of a steamboat explosion. He writes, I am concerned about Hart's deterioration. I am afraid his hands will be crippled or greatly disfigured, but it was such a merciful rescue from the jaws of death that we ought not to complain.
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Letters from Randall Lee Gibson, 1874-1879

  • Box 23, folder 15
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Assorted, 1875-1896, undated

Louisiana Biographies, Vol. 1 No.1, 1882 February 11

  • Box 23, folder 16
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Randall Lee Gibson Power of Attorney, 1881 April 4

  • Box 23, folder 17
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Randall Lee Gibson State of Louisiana taxes, 1875-1881

  • Box 23, folder 18
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Tulane University in memoriam of Randall Lee Gibson, 1892

  • Box 23, folder 19
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Randall Lee Gibson clippings, 1894-1896, undated

  • Box 30, folder 4
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Assorted manuscripts, photographs and printed materials, 1811-1977, undated

The Assorted manuscripts, photographs and printed materials series comprises books, clippings, correspondence, drawings, notes, photographs, and records related to the Duncan, Foster and Gibson families but with an unclear provenance. Correspondence includes letters by significant 19th century educators like Louis Agassiz and David Sayre. Drawings are architectural and artistic sketches. Notes include lists or narratives for events. Books, magazines, poems were presumably owned by family members. The photographs appear to primarily depict persons near the turn of the twentieth century.

Assorted correspondence, 1811-1971, undated

Louis Agassiz, 1893 January

  • Box 25, folder 23
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Assorted family, 1842-1877

  • Box 25, folder 24
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Assorted family, 1884-1890, undated

  • Box 25, folder 25
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Nannie Barr, 1861

  • Box 25, folder 26
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George Berryman, 1870

  • Box 25, folder 27
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Joseph Clay Stiles Blackburn, 1871

  • Box 25, folder 28
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Frank Brady to General John Hunt Morgan, 1862 September 11

  • Box 26, folder 1
Brady writes I have received of Mr. James McKee the sum of two hundred and fiftydollars. He states that he did not place any claim with Combs. Did not and would not receive one cent-for his horse. He refers to Mr. Frank P. Kinkead and Dr. Whitington the statements he makes. James McKee owned a farm near Versailles. Frank (Francis) Brady was a Lieutenant in command of Morgan's Scouts. He was born near Paris, Ky. In the autumn of 1865 he married Mary Fulmer of Eufaula, Georgia. In 1867 he drowned in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana while on a business trip.
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William Campbell Preston Breckinridge, 1866-1876

  • Box 26, folder 2
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Wickliffe Cooper, 1862 August 25

  • Box 26, folder 3
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Friends' correspondence, 1859-1889, undated

  • Box 26, folder 4
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Susan Preston Grigsby, 1864-1889

  • Box 26, folder 5
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William Preston Hart, 1859-1889

  • Box 26, folder 6
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James C. Irvine, 1856-1868

  • Box 26, folder 7
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M.C. Johnson to Dent, 1862 February 27

  • Box 26, folder 8
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Henry Keane to David Sayre, 1842 October 1

  • Box 26, folder 9
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Unidentified notes and correspondence, 1811, 1864, undated

  • Box 26, folder 10
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Addressed envelops, 1971, undated

  • Box 26, folder 11
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Cards, postcards and invitations, 1872-1926, undated

  • Box 26, folder 12
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Drawings, notes, and printed materials, 1836-1977, undated

An Appreciation of the Half-Bred Horse by Olive Bennett, after 1944

  • Box 27, folder 1
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Architectural drawing of horse stalls, undated

  • Box 27, folder 2
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Joseph Bowmar draft of circular, 1865 August 5

  • Box 27, folder 3
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Civil War broadside, undated

  • Box 27, folder 4
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Confederate Memorial Hall brochure, undated

  • Box 27, folder 5
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Deed of conveyance template, 1871

  • Box 27, folder 6
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Delegates and Alternates to the Democratic National Convention booklet, St. Louis, 1916 July 14

  • Box 27, folder 7
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Democratic Party of Kentucky draft resolution, undated

  • Box 27, folder 8
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Drawing of parallel bars, undated

  • Box 27, folder 9
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Fragment titled Miriam, from unknown drama, undated

  • Box 27, folder 10
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Godey's Magazine and Lady's Book , undated

  • Box 27, folder 11
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Kentucky Agricultural and Mechanical Association constitution and by-laws, 1850 April

  • Box 27, folder 12
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Kentucky Agricultural and Mechanical Association seventeenth annual fair at Lexington book, 1893 August

  • Box 27, folder 13
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Kentucky Historical and Genealogical Magazine, vol. 1, no. 1, 1899 June

  • Box 27, folder 14
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Latonia Jockey Club spring meeting booklet, 1896

  • Box 27, folder 15
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Lee Memorial Association proposal, undated

  • Box 27, folder 16
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Little Women: A Comedy in Four Acts by Mariam De Forest, 1921

  • Box 27, folder 17
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Manuscript poem, undated

  • Box 27, folder 18
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Memoranda of the Preston Family , 1842, 1865, undated

  • Box 27, folder 19
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Newspaper clippings, 1860-1899, undated

  • Box 30, folder 2
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Newspaper clippings, 1900-1966, undated

  • Box 30, folder 3
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Pamphlets, circulars, and hotel stationary, 1845, 1888, undated

  • Box 27, folder 20
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Pettit family genealogy, undated

  • Box 27, folder 21
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Poem: There is a Letter in the Candle, undated

  • Box 27, folder 22
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Political statements, undated

  • Box 27, folder 23
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Porter, Ebenezer Letter on Eloquence and Style book, 1836

  • Box 27, folder 24
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Society for the College Instruction of Women circular, 1883 February 22

  • Box 27, folder 25
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Voorhies architectural drawings, undated

  • Box 27, folder 26
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Vice in Lexington newspaper clipping, undated

  • Box 27, folder 27
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Nathaniel Hart Gibson portrait appraisal for the Kentucky Historical Society, 1977

  • Box 27, folder 28
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Narrative notes, undated

  • Box 27, folder 29
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Social list, undated

  • Box 27, folder 30
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Unidentified lists, undated

  • Box 27, folder 31
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Legal records and notes, 1841-1894, undated

Hartland Farm sales book, 1869

  • Box 26, folder 20
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Hart v. F. Harper petition, Woodford, Kentucky, undated

  • Box 26, folder 21
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John W. Horine to George Williams property deed, Fayette County, Kentucky, 1876 January

  • Box 26, folder 22
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House Bill, Kentucky, husband and wife act, 1894 January 22

  • Box 26, folder 23
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D.C. Humphreys Executor Plaintiff vs. D. C. Humphreys Legatees & Defendants, Woodford County, Kentucky, 1868

  • Box 26, folder 24
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Richard Keiningham and Benjamin Keiningham deed trust, Bourbon County, Kentucky, 1841

  • Box 26, folder 25
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Hugh Kerr & Co. investment in Robert Clark, grocer, 1843

  • Box 26, folder 26
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Notes on Harris v. John G. Marshall, undated

  • Box 26, folder 27
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William Voorhies deed map, undated

  • Box 26, folder 28
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Voorhies remarks in US Deficiency Appropriation Bill, 1870 March

  • Box 26, folder 29
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Woodford Court of Common Pleas summon to Louisiana Gibson, Tobias Gibson and S.F. Humphreys, 1874 September 29

  • Box 26, folder 30
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Photographs, 1894, 1913, 1934-1938, undated

Charles Herbert Anderson and Harrison G. Foster crossing the River Styx, 1938 July

  • Box 27, folder 32
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Confederate States of America veterans Jack Baker, W.G. Gossom and Hart Gibson, 1894 February 25

  • Box 27, folder 33
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Henry Timberlake Duncan portrait, undated

  • Box 27, folder 34
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Exterior view of house with two men in front, undated

  • Box 27, folder 35
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Four women in a car next to a fence, undated

  • Box 27, folder 36
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Tobias Gibson house, Second Street, Lexington, Kentucky, undated

  • Box 27, folder 37
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Portrait of a young man, undated

  • Box 27, folder 38
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Three men wearing boater hats, undated

  • Box 27, folder 39
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White woman laying in chair carried by boys in peasant clothes, undated

  • Box 27, folder 40
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Harrison G. Foster drinking with Col. Roche, pattern toast, 1937 May 1

  • Box 27, folder 41
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Group photo of the Thigum Thu centered about Col. James Maurice Roche, 1934

  • Box 27, folder 42
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Interior of Yale dorm room, 1913

  • Box 31, folder 1
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Interior of Andover dorm room, undated

  • Box 31, folder 2
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New machine in Calgary, undated

  • Box 32, folder 1
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Cement mixer, undated

  • Box 32, folder 2
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Cement mixer, undated

  • Box 32, folder 3
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Two men with wooden platform, undated

  • Box 32, folder 4
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Two men with working machine in factory, undated

  • Box 32, folder 5
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Pipe machine with notes for table rest, undated

  • Box 32, folder 6
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Pipe machine in factory, undated

  • Box 32, folder 7
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Pipe machine in factory, undated

  • Box 32, folder 8
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Vertical surface grinder, undated

  • Box 32, folder 9
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Exterior of San Diego Glazed Cement Pipe Company factory, undated

  • Box 32, folder 10
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Envelop labelled Photograph of Thomas Machine, undated

  • Box 32, folder 11
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Man in uniform, undated

  • Box 32, folder 12
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Researchers are required to have an SCRC Researcher Account in order to request or order digital copies of materials. Research Account set-up and use instructions can be found at: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCRCaccount

If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

For all other questions, contact us at: https://libraries.uky.edu/ContactSCRC.

Researchers are required to have an SCRC Researcher Account in order to request or order digital copies of materials. Research Account set-up and use instructions can be found at: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCRCaccount

If you are visiting the Breckinridge Research Room, please request materials at least 48 business hours in advance of your arrival.

For all other questions, contact us at: https://libraries.uky.edu/ContactSCRC.

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