Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers

Abstract

The Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers (dated 1811-1985, undated; 12.4 cubic feet; 30 boxes) comprise correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, and ephemera, which document the families' daily life, economic influence, and personal opinions primarily during the 19th century.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers
Extent
12.6 Cubic Feet
Subjects
Decedents' estates -- Kentucky.
Families -- Kentucky -- History -- 19th century
Families -- Kentucky -- History -- 20th century
Letters.
Plantations -- Kentucky.
Plantation life -- Louisiana.
Plantation owners.
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
Slavery -- Kentucky.
Slavery -- United States.
Arrangement
Collection is arranged into four series by subject and format: Duncan family; Foster family; Gibson family; Assorted manuscripts, photographs, and printed materials.
Finding Aid Author
Sarah Mackenzie Wade and Ida Lucille Sell
Preferred Citation
2017ms056 : [identification of item], Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers, 1811-1985, undated, University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
The Duncan and Gibson families were prominent families of Kentucky and Louisiana during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Foster family had roots in Kentucky, yet gained prominence through the timber industry of Minnesota and Washington during the late nineteenth century.
Daughter of Lexington lawyer and hemp manufacturer, Henry Timberlake Duncan (1800-1880), Mary Duncan (1838-1910) married Col. Nathaniel Hart Gibson (1835-1904). Her husband, Nathaniel Hart Gibson, commonly referred to as Hart, served for the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. Hart's father, Tobias Gibson, Sr. (1800-1872), was one of the leading cotton and sugar planters of the Mississippi Valley but made Lexington, Ky. his principal residence. Hart's brother, Randall Lee Gibson (1832-1892) served as a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator for Louisiana after his time as Confederate Brigadier General during the United States Civil War. Both the Duncan and Gibson families owned slaves in Kentucky and Louisiana leading up to the Civil War. Mary Duncan and Col. Nathaniel Hart Gibson's daughter, Elizabeth Dunster Gibson (d. 1926) married Harrison Gardner Foster (d. 1940). Harrison's father, Addison Gardner Foster (1837-1917), was a successful business owner of timber and coal companies in Minnesota and Washington. He served in the United States Senate for Washington State from 1899-1905.
Scope and Content
The Duncan, Foster, Gibson family papers (dated 1811-1985, undated; 12.4 cubic feet; 30 boxes) comprise correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, and ephemera, which document the families' daily life, economic influence, and personal opinions primarily during the 19th century. A large part of the collection consists of correspondence to Colonel Nathaniel Hart Gibson, Mary Duncan Gibson, Henry Timberlake Duncan, Tobias Gibson, Sr., and their relatives during the mid to late nineteenth century when they primarily resided in Lexington, Kentucky. Letters in the collection discuss significant issues of the time, such as slavery, the Civil War, and reconstruction. Letters by Tobias Gibson, Sr., a successful sugar plantation owner in Louisiana, discuss moving slaves from Kentucky to Louisiana right before the Civil War as well as contempt for President Abraham Lincoln. Correspondence between brothers, Nathaniel Hart Gibson, known as Hart, and Senator Randall Lee Gibson, include negative reactions to the role of African-Americans after the Civil War. Letters to and from Mary Duncan Gibson primarily discuss family matters, especially among the Foster side of the family, who resided in Minnesota and Washington state near the turn of the twentieth century. Notable items include the plans and deed records for Ingleside manor, the large Lexington estate purchased by Nathaniel Hart and Mary Duncan Gibson in 1879 and given to their descendants upon Mary's death in 1910 and the handwritten account of John Hunt Morgan's Raid into Kentucky.

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Conditions Governing Access Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
The physical rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.

Contents of the Collection

Duncan family, 1828-1902, undated

The Duncan family series comprises the personal papers of Henry T. Duncan as well as his relatives and ancestors. These relations include Elizabeth Pyke, Stephen Duncan, Henry T. Duncan Jr., Lily Duncan, and Mary Duncan. The majority of the series is correspondence and business papers. A significant portion of the correspondence consists of letters between Henry T. Duncan and his second cousin, Stephen Duncan. Henry and Stephen primarily discuss business in their letters. For instance, in 1840 Stephen Duncan wrote Henry Duncan about an order for Henry Clay cordage damaged during a tornado in Natchez on May 7th. Henry and Stephen also discussed politics; tariffs on foreign fiber, cordage, and cotton bagging; and slavery. Stephen Duncan (1787-1867), second cousin of Henry T. Duncan, was the wealthiest cotton planter in the South prior to the US Civil War and the second largest slave owner in the country. He owned plantations throughout Louisiana and Mississippi. Henry and Stephen were partners in the sale and transportation of cordage and bagging manufactured in Kentucky and sold in support of cotton plantations. Stephen Duncan opposed the Confederacy and relocated to New York City in 1863.

Family correspondence, 1837-1902, undated

Ellen Duncan Voorhies letters, 1856-1870, undated

  • Box 4, folder 9
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to her husband, Henry T. Duncan, undated

  • Box 4, folder 10
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to her daughter, Mary Duncan, 1854-1855

  • Box 4, folder 11
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to her daughter, Mary Duncan, 1856-1860, undated

  • Box 4, folder 12
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan to Hart Gibson, undated

  • Box 4, folder 13
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Elizabeth Dunster Pyke Duncan incoming correspondence, 1844-1870, undated

  • Box 4, folder 14
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Elizabeth (Lily) Duncan to Hart Gibson, 1864

  • Box 4, folder 15
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Lily Duncan to her sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1854, 1892, undated

  • Box 5, folder 8
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Lily Duncan incoming correspondence, 1874-1879, undated

  • Box 5, folder 9
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Lily Duncan financial documents, 1883-1902

  • Box 5, folder 10
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Lily Duncan, Coney Island Jockey Club entry forms, 1892-1895

  • Box 5, folder 11
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Lily Duncan, 1857-1858

  • Box 4, folder 16
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1837, 1854

  • Box 4, folder 17
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1855

  • Box 5, folder 1
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his sister, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1856-1859, undated

  • Box 5, folder 2
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to his parents, 1857-1864, undated

  • Box 5, folder 3
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. to Hart Gibson, 1848

  • Box 5, folder 4
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. incoming correspondence, 1863, 1871

  • Box 5, folder 5
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Henry T. Duncan, Jr. signed check, circa 1870

  • Box 5, folder 6
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[Henry T. Duncan, Jr.?] letter fragment, undated

  • Box 5, folder 7
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Mary Duncan to Mr. Duncan, undated

  • Box 5, folder 12
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Jenkins family correspondence, 1843-1872

  • Box 25, folder 21
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Toulina Johnson to mother (Harriet Johnson), undated

  • Box 25, folder 22
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Henry T. Duncan, 1828-1884, undated

Correspondence, 1836-1884, undated

Incoming, 1840-1881, undated

Duncan family letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1842-1866, undated

  • Box 1, folder 6
This folder contains family letters written to Henry T. Duncan. It includes a letter written to Duncan from his cousin Rebecca Turley (July 5, 1849) talking about various cholera epidemics in Lexington and St. Louis. One letter (July 17, [1862]) from Mary Seargent Duncan, the wife of Henry P. Duncan (1823-1979), describes the destruction of family plantations in Mississippi during the Civil War. A letter from Henry Duncan, Jr. (April 19, 1863) includes a clipping announcing that a violation of General Orders no. 47, prohibiting persons from dealing in Confederate money, will be dealt with in the provisions of that order. To top

Timberlake family letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1845-1872

  • Box 1, folder 7
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James Erwin letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1841-1842

  • Box 1, folder 8
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Mary Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, undated

  • Box 25, folder 19
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David Sayre letter to Henry T. Duncan, 1862 March 3

  • Box 25, folder 20
Requests Duncan's assistance in obtaining appointments to military academies. In his post script he states, I hope the President will release Governor Morehead.
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1839-1841

  • Box 1, folder 9
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1842-1843

  • Box 1, folder 10
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1844-1849

  • Box 1, folder 11
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1851-1859

  • Box 1, folder 12
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1860-1862

  • Box 2, folder 1
Folder includes a letter from H.H. Timberlake, a member of Duncan's mother's family, to Henry T. Duncan (December 6, 1861) in which he questions Abraham Lincoln and Secretary Cameron's views on slavery and its impact on Kentuckians who supported the government as their patriotic and holy duty of crushing out rebellion, and restoring the constitution and enforcement of the laws. Furthermore, Timberlake speculates, if a crusade against the institution of slavery is to be the leading policy of the administration will Kentucky submit or spurn such an alliance? Folder also includes a letter from Colonel Charles Anderson about horses in Kentucky during the Civil War. He is seeking a black thoroughbred stallion and notes in the letter If Morgan (John Hunt) has not made off with him, the horse is I think somewhere about you here. To top

Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1863

  • Box 2, folder 2
Folder contains business and personal letters sent to Duncan. It includes a letter from Charles [Burick?] considering speculating on Confederate currency in New Orleans (January 7, 1863). To top

Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1864

  • Box 2, folder 3
Contains a letter written by General Ablin F. Schoepf (1822-1886) the commandant of Fort Delaware where Hart Gibson was incarcerated during the Civil War. Schoepf mentions a visit made by Duncan's daughters and references Hart Gibson saying I am only sorry that I cannot enjoy his company as much as I want if our military creed was the same. To top

Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1865-1870

  • Box 2, folder 4
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1874-1881

  • Box 2, folder 5
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1840-1865

  • Box 28, folder 1
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Letters to Henry T. Duncan, undated

  • Box 2, folder 6
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Mary Duncan Barr letters to her brother, Henry T. Duncan, 1852-1859

  • Box 5, folder 13
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Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1840

  • Box 5, folder 14
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In May 1840, Dr. Duncan writes: Major Gibson's bagging has not yet arrived at Alexander's Landing and Mr. Clay's cordage was damaged by being exposed to 14 hours of rain. A tornado hit Natchez, Mississippi, on May 7, 1840, killing 369 people. The May 14, 1840, letter contains more descriptions of the tornado. To top

Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1841-1842

  • Box 5, folder 15
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In a letter written in September 1842, Duncan, a Whig but not a fan of Henry Clay, discusses Clay's Tariff, which restored or placed new import taxes on foreign fiber, cordage, and cotton bagging. He writes in an August 22, 1842, letter, if Congress adjourns, without passing a revenue bill, the fate of the Whig Party is especially sealed. -as it would well be. I am persuaded that the more moderate and reflecting will secede. While the more immediately interested in the protection policy, will be open to and opponents. I think nothing can justify- or even excuse the Whigs. To top

Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1843-1844

  • Box 5, folder 16
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In an April 21, 1843, letter Duncan writes, I have a letter from Mr. Butler of the 15th Inst. in which he proposes to sell to me his Caillou place-for $80,000. Duncan then proceeds to the weigh the pros and cons of buying a sugar plantation at that price and provides a primer on plantation finance. He concludes this portion of the letter with: Ellis & Battle have a very desirable plantation on Terrebonne which they are always anxious to sell. He goes on to say that they would take $60,000 in cash for it. On October 30, 1843, Duncan writes, The drumbeats for Mr. [Henry] Clay could not be better. I wish most sincerely he would not go to N. Carolina or anywhere else till the election is done. And I also wish he would avoid all occasions, (and) the subject of a bank of the U.S. On November 23, 1844, Duncan laments the election of James K. Polk as president, writing The long agony is over and J.K. Polk is President! Well, it is hard - very hard to believe. He is a man of mystification to us...I have made up my mind (to) never again cast my vote for President. To top

Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1845-1849

  • Box 5, folder 17
Dr. Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan contain common themes, including business, politics, and travel. In a letter written on April 18, 1847, Duncan discusses his views on an end to slavery, I have no doubt you will in your situation, provide for a general, but gradual, emancipation of the slaves in your state. If I were a property holder, say even a slave holder, in the state, I would not object to this. Provided it was gradual, for I am sure it will displace the value of all other property in the state. He also writes about the presidential election of 1848. In a letter written on August 8, 1848, he states that The experience of the last 9 months has completely satisfied me that there exists no where, so selfish a set of demagogues, as is to be gleaned among those identified as our first statesmen - and those being first in the [?], I would place Mr. Clay, and Mr. Webster and Mr. Van Buren. He also defends General Zachary Taylor, writing that You speak of Gen. Taylor as 'a man o fno principles.' This is unjust and I suspect very untrue. To top

Stephen Duncan letters to Henry T. Duncan, 1861-1864, undated

  • Box 5, folder 18
Stephen Duncan's letters to Henry T. Duncan written during the Civil War reflect on politics as well as the economic cost of the war. In 1863, Duncan moved to New York City and writes to Henry T. Duncan a long letter (December 1, 1863) discussing the losses on his sugar and cotton plantations in terms of property and human. He writes I brought nothing from the south, but the proceeds of the sale of our plate...I was glad enough to have the means of getting away with life. He provides the terms of the emancipation of his slaves (without compensation) and states that he does not believe he will live to see the Union restored. In a letter written on February 16, 1864, Duncan writes that his son, Henry, and his wife narrowly escaped from their home on board a steamboat after guerillas threatened to hang him. Since I wrote you last, the Federal Army, and the [?], have completely gutted my two plantations. To top

Daniel Duncan letter to his father, Henry T. Duncan, 1841 February 11

  • Box 4, folder 8
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Outgoing, 1848-1872

Henry T. Duncan letters to his daughter, Lily, 1870

  • Box 1, folder 1
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Henry T. Duncan letters to his daughter, Mary, 1848-1872

  • Box 1, folder 2
Letters from Henry T. Duncan to his daughter Mary Duncan, later Gibson. His letters discuss school, her spending habits, and family and business news. In one he sends her specimens from Mammoth Cave including fish eyes (1855). In another he says You will see that I am sojourning for several days at my bachelor establishment in Bourbon with no company but the overseer and 2 Irish laborers engaged in building stone fences. To top

Henry T. Duncan letters to his son, 1856

  • Box 1, folder 3
Letters from Henry T. Duncan to his son Henry T. Duncan, Jr. The folder includes a letter written on June 12, 1856, in which he cautions his son against openly discussing the political situations surrounding the Charles Sumner and Kansas controversies.
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Henry T. Duncan letters to Hart Gibson, 1840, 1864

  • Box 1, folder 4
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Letters written by Henry T. Duncan, 1859, 1861

  • Box 1, folder 5
Folder contains three letters written by Henry T. Duncan. Two of the letters were written to Brigadier General Jeremiah T. Boyle (1818-1871) who was the military commander of Kentucky during 1863. In the letter written on June 30, 1863, Duncan writes Boyle concerning the slaves and property owned by his son-in-law Hart Gibson. Nine of Hart Gibson's slaves were taken in the public works and not returned. In the second letter to Boyle, written on July 11, 1863, Duncan writes on behalf of Thomas Wallace, who was taken prisoner near Perryville. Additionally, he mentions Hart Gibson's slaves from the first letter. Boyle wrote a reply on the verso, saying it is improper for Boyle to help Wallace. The last letter was written by Duncan to an unidentified Doctor on May 28, 1859. It refers to a published account of an altercation between General Leslie Combs and Henry T. Duncan. Duncan refers to the article as utterly destitute of truth and such a perversion of the facts. The letter give Duncan's account in detail. To top

By subject, 1836-1884, undated

Architecture letters, 1842-1845, 1863

  • Box 2, folder 7
File contains letters relating to architecture and buildings. it includes a letter from architect John McMurtry to Henry T. Duncan, June 20, 1842, concerning borrowing money to pay off other debts. To top

Crops letters, 1859, 1862

  • Box 2, folder 8
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Domestic letters, 1841-1867

  • Box 2, folder 9
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Horses and other livestock letters, 1859-1865, undated

  • Box 2, folder 10
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Slavery letters, 1844-1884, undated

  • Box 3, folder 1
This file contains letters and documents relating to slaves owned by Henry T. Duncan or offered to him for sale. Several of the letters describe individual slaves and their health in detail. Two letters written on the same day [April 29, ?] by John Bell Swain talk about the capture of a runaway slave. Correspondants include C. Kelly, Anna des Cognets, E. Gills, I.F. Hall, James McRae, Thomas C. Gilroy, and William A. Gorham. The folder also includes a letter from O. Ferriss, of the U.S. Treasury Department, to Hart Gibson (January 11, 1884), who is attempting to locate information on Peter Bruce and Chloe, former slaves of Henry T. Duncan, Hart's deceased father-in-law. To top

William H. Pope and Company letters, 1836-1859

  • Box 3, folder 2
The William H. Pope & Co. (Louisville, Ky.) advertised bagging, bale rope, bagging, and slave clothing for sale. There are 21 letters from Pope or his employees to Duncan. They provide insight into how Duncan marketed his hemp. William Hamilton Pope (1803-1867) was a Harvard graduate (1817-1821), attorney, and later president of William H. Pope & Co. In 1832, he became president of the Bank of Kentucky (1837-1840). His home, later known as Bonny Castle Place, was built during the period 1825-1835 upon his father's estate. Pope's company also dealt in slaves. To top

Letters about Henry T. Duncan, 1844, 1862

  • Box 3, folder 3
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Files and financial documents, 1828-1879, undated

Account sheets, 1839-1843, 1864

  • Box 28, folder 2
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Architecture, 1839-1859

  • Box 3, folder 4
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Articles of partnership with Samuel Pyke, 1828

  • Box 3, folder 5
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Handwritten recipes, undated

  • Box 3, folder 6
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Checks, 1858-1859, 1878

  • Box 3, folder 7
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Deeds, 1835-1856, undated

  • Box 3, folder 8
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Deeds, 1842-1865

  • Box 30, folder 1
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Deeds and agreements, 1857-1877

  • Box 3, folder 9
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Domestic accounts, 1840-1841

  • Box 28, folder 3
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Domestic accounts and receipts, 1841-1867

  • Box 3, folder 10
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Draft grant to the Covington and Lexington Rail Road Company, 1852 June

  • Box 3, folder 11
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Financial report, undated

  • Box 3, folder 12
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Hemp sales and shipments, 1834-1862, undated

  • Box 3, folder 13
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Henry Clay monument, 1854-1874, undated

  • Box 3, folder 14
Henry T. Duncan was the chairman of a committee to raise money to create a monument to statesman Henry Clay. To top

John McMurtry account sheets, 1841-1842

  • Box 28, folder 4
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John McMurtry account sheets, 1841-1843

  • Box 3, folder 15
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Kentucky bagging and rope accounts, 1837-1838

  • Box 28, folder 11
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Land surveys, 1845, undated

  • Box 3, folder 16
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Lexington Cemetery, 1843-1867, undated

  • Box 3, folder 17
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List of thoroughbred colts and fillies, 1878

  • Box 3, folder 18
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The Necessity of Hard Study , undated

  • Box 3, folder 19
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Northern Bank of Kentucky, 1850-1878, undated

  • Box 4, folder 1
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Receipts and accounts, 1839-1849

  • Box 4, folder 2
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Receipts and accounts, 1852-1863

  • Box 4, folder 3
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Receipts and accounts, 1864-1867

  • Box 4, folder 4
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Receipts and accounts, 1870-1879, undated

  • Box 4, folder 5
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Samuel Pyke accounts, 1841

  • Box 3, folder 20
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State of Louisiana, 1842, 1854

  • Box 3, folder 21
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Travel pass, 1862 September 12

  • Box 3, folder 22
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Valuable papers , 1866-1877, undated

  • Box 4, folder 6
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Will, 1859 January 25

  • Box 4, folder 7
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Foster family, 1865-1985, undated

The Foster family series comprises the papers of Hart Gibson Foster and his mother, Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, as well as Foster family relatives including Harrison Gardner, Addison Gardner Foster, Florence Jones Vining, and Martha Ann Weatherbee Foster. The series also contains assorted legal, genealogical, military records and printed materials. Hart Gibson Foster (1890-1976) was the grandson of Nathaniel Hart and Mary Gibson. His papers primarily document Foster's early education at Philips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts and at Yale University; his business activities in the cement pipe industry; his career in the U.S. Army (WWI and WWII); and his work in the oil and gas industry, banking, real estate, and farming. There are also files pertaining to Foster's wife, Florence Jones Vining. During the 1930s, Vining served in the Federal Housing Commission and in the U.S. Department of the Interior. Correspondents of interest in this portion of the collection include Vice President Alben Barkley, General George Duncan, Chief Justice Fred Vinson, Senator M.M. Logan, congressional representatives Emmet O'Neal and Edward O'Neill, and Louisville Courier-Journal editor Mark Etheridge. The Foster family became connected to the Gibson family when Harrison G. Foster married Elizabeth Dunster Duncan Gibson in 1889. The family originally settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts in 1638, but later Harrison G. Foster along with his mother, Martha Wetherbee, and father, Addison G. Foster, moved to St. Paul, Minnesota. From Minnesota, Harrison G. Foster and his wife and eldest son, Hart G. Foster, moved to Tacoma, Washington in 1890. In 1901, the Foster family moved back to Minnesota where they remained until circa 1917 when the family moved to Lexington, Ky.

Foster family letters and documents, 1889-1940, undated

Addison Gardner Foster telegraph, 1890

  • Box 6, folder 1
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Addison Gardner Foster clipping, 1903

  • Box 6, folder 2
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Addison Gardner Foster II letters to brother, Hart Gibson Foster, 1907-1923, undated

  • Box 6, folder 3-6
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Addison Gardner Foster II letters to mother, 1911 June 1

  • Box 6, folder 7
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Addison Gardner Foster II letters from Sonny, 1930-1931

  • Box 6, folder 8
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Addison Gardner II envelope from American Consular Service, undated

  • Box 6, folder 9
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Everett W. Foster clipping, 1927

  • Box 7, folder 6
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Harrison Gardner Foster agreements and correspondence, 1892-1940, undated

  • Box 7, folder 7-8
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Harrison Gardner Foster photographs, undated

  • Box 7, folder 9
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Harrison Gardner Foster clippings, 1939-1940, undated

  • Box 29, folder 9
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Harrison Gardner Foster clippings, 1909-1940, undated

  • Box 7, folder 16
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Martha Foster letters to Mary Duncan Gibson, 1889, 1898

  • Box 7, folder 10
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Martha Ann Weatherbee Foster US President Inauguration invitation, 1913

  • Box 7, folder 11
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Francis Weatherbee albumen print, undated

  • Box 7, folder 12
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1869-1939, undated

Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her brothers, Duncan (Buddie) and Hart Gibson, 1869, 1877

  • Box 6, folder 10
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her aunt, Lily Duncan, 1877

  • Box 6, folder 11
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her father, Nathaniel Hart Gibson, 1877, 1900

  • Box 6, folder 12
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her mother, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1877-1886

  • Box 6, folder 13
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her sister, Louisiana Breckinridge Hart Gibson, 1877, undated

  • Box 6, folder 14
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to her mother, Mary Duncan Gibson, 1891-1896, undated

  • Box 6, folder 15
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster estate forms, 1922-1930

  • Box 6, folder 16
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster estate agreements, 1927

  • Box 7, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster estate bills and receipts, 1901-1928, undated

  • Box 7, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster newspaper clippings, 1926, undated

  • Box 7, folder 3
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Correspondence about Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1889-1926

  • Box 7, folder 4
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Elizabeth Dunster Duncan Foster Pettit clippings, 1939, undated

  • Box 7, folder 5
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Hart Gibson Foster, 1892-1985, undated

From Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster, 1907-1936, undated

Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, undated

  • Box 7, folder 13
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907 January-October

  • Box 7, folder 14
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1907 October-December

  • Box 7, folder 15
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 January-March

  • Box 8, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 April-June

  • Box 8, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1908 September-November

  • Box 8, folder 3
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 January

  • Box 8, folder 4
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 March-April

  • Box 8, folder 5
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1909 May-December

  • Box 8, folder 6
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1910 May-August

  • Box 8, folder 7
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1910 September-November

  • Box 8, folder 8
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1911

  • Box 8, folder 9
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1912 January-May

  • Box 9, folder 1
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1912 June-December

  • Box 9, folder 2
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1913 January-May

  • Box 9, folder 3
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1913 May-November

  • Box 9, folder 4
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Elizabeth Dunster Gibson Foster letters to Hart Gibson Foster, 1914

  • Box 9, folder 5