Jean-Paul Sartre diary

Abstract

The Jean-Paul Sartre diary (dated 1951; 0.01 cubic feet; 1 folder) is comprised of 15 handwritten pages documenting one of Jean-Paul Sartre's visits to Rome.

Descriptive Summary

Title
Jean-Paul Sartre diary
Date
1951
Creator
Sartre, Jean-Paul, 1905-1980
Extent
0.01 Cubic Feet
Subjects
Existentialism
Philosophy.
Arrangement
Collection is arranged chronologically.
Finding Aid Author
Dealla Samadi
Preferred Citation
69m23 : [identification of item], Jean-Paul Sartre diary, 1951, University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was a French philosopher known for his foundational concepts of modern existentialism. He was born in Paris, France in 1905 and studied at the École Normale Supérieure. He later taught philosophy in Le Havre, Laon, and Lycée Pasteur.
Sartre was very fond of Italy, and visited frequently. In 1951, he wrote a book entitled La Reine Albemarle, in which he described Italian cities Venice, Capri Rome, and Naples.
Scope and Content
The Jean-Paul Sartre diary (September 21-25, 1951; 0.01 cubic feet; 1 item) comprises 15 handwritten pages in French, documenting one of Jean-Paul Sartre's visits to Rome, Italy. The Jean-Paul Sartre diary is the first chapter of a book Sartre wrote in 1951 entitled La Reine Albemarle. This book, currently published as fragments, details Sartre's visits to Venice, Capri, and Naples with the underlying themes of light, time, and beauty.
He opens his diary with a descriptive account of his arrival to Rome: looking out of the plane window to see the "darkening green carpet" below, the "thickening warmth" during the plane's descent and observing of his fellow travelers who were "just as English as they were this morning in London, just as French as they were in Paris". Sartre had a particular fondness for Rome, "a city in a state of celebration, every night". Over the course of four days (September 21-25), he visits place Navona, place Saint-Ignace, the Roman and Trajan Forums.

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
The physical rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections Research Center.

Contents of the Collection

Jean-Paul Sartre diary, 1951

  • Box VF-52, folder 1
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UK Libraries Special Collections Research Center is open Monday to Friday, 9:00am to 4:00pm. Appointments are encouraged but not required. Schedule an appointment here.

Researchers must have an SCRC Researcher Account to request materials. View account set-up and use instructions here.

Questions? Contact SCRC via our Contact Form.

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You may come across language in UK Libraries Special Collections Research Center collections and online resources that you find harmful or offensive. SCRC collects materials from different cultures and time periods to preserve and make available the historical record. These materials document the time period when they were created and the view of their creator. As a result, some may demonstrate racist and offensive views that do not reflect the values of UK Libraries.

If you find description with problematic language that you think SCRC should review, please contact us at SCRC@uky.edu.