James Clay family papers

Abstract

The James Brown Clay family papers contain correspondence, letters, clippings, certificates, legal documents, manuscripts, ephemera and photographs of family relations and business. James Brown Clay (181-1864) was a Democratic Party member of the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky. He and his wife, Susan Marie Jacob, had ten children and lived at the Ashland Estate in Lexington, Kentucky. Their son, Charles Donald Clay was a career soldier and his descendents also served in the United States military.

Descriptive Summary

Title
James Clay family papers
Date
1770-2006
Extent
16.42 Cubic feet
Subjects
American poetry--History and criticism
American poetry--Women authors.
Art, American--History
Art--United States.
Correspondence.
Families--Photographs.
Family archives--Kentucky--Lexington.
Family--history
Korean War, 1950-1953
Legal documents.
Military history.
Spanish-American War, 1898.
World War, 1914-1918.
World War, 1939-1945.
Arrangement
Collection is arranged by format.
Finding Aid Author
Finding aid prepared by Described by Lindsey Apple, arranged by Ida Sell
Preferred Citation
2010MS041: [identification of item], James Clay family papers, 1770-2006, University of Kentucky Special Collections.
Repository
University of Kentucky

Collection Overview

Biography / History
James Brown Clay Sr., born 1817, was the tenth of Henry and Lucretia Clay’s eleven children. James was a farmer, businessman, lawyer, and politician. He purchased Ashland from his mother, the Lexington, Kentucky home built by Henry Clay. In 1843, James B. Clay married Susan Maria Jacob, sister of a three-time mayor of Louisville, Kentucky, Charles Donald Jacob. The couple eventually had ten children. He was elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fifth United States Congress (March 4, 1857–March 3, 1859). Supporting the Confederacy, he chose exile in Canada but died of tuberculosis before the end of the war in 1864. His wife and descendants lived in central Kentucky.
Members of the James Clay family as well as other relevant people include:
Thomas Prather Jacob (1827-1889), brother-in-law of James Clay. Susan Maria Jacob Clay (1823-1905), wife of James Clay.
Lucy Jacob Clay (1844-1863), daughter of James Clay. James Clay, Jr. (1846-1906), son of James Clay. Harry Independence Clay (1849-1884), son of James Clay. Lucretia Teetee Clay (1851-1923), daughter of James Clay. Thomas Clay (1853-1939), son of James Clay. Charles Donald Clay (1857-1935), son of James Clay. George Clay (1858-1934), son of James Clay.
Mariah Pepper Clay (1861-1939), wife of Charles D. Clay. Susan Clay Sawitzky (1897-1981), daughter of Charles Donald Clay. William Sawitzky (1879-1947), husband of Susan Clay Sawitzky. Charles D. Clay, Jr. (1899-1922), son of Charles D. Clay. Expelled from West Point. Committed suicide or was murdered at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Robert Pepper Clay (1903-1977), son of Charles D. Clay. Maria Martindale Clay (1903-1997), wife of Robert Pepper Clay. Elizabeth Clay Blanford (1904-1999), daughter of Charles D. Clay.
Boyajian family: Lucy Starling Clay, daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Robert P. Clay, married Ned Boyajian in 1963 and they had two sons, Ned and Robert. Elizabeth Prudence Pinnie Pepper, mother of Mariah Clay. Henry Howgate (1834-1901), Arctic expedition leader. Lucy Scott, woman courted by Charles D. Clay. Geoge Nicholas (1754-1799), Henry Clay's law partner.
Scope and Content
The James Clay family papers comprise correspondence, letters, clippings, certificates, legal documents, manuscripts, ephemera, and photographs, which document over two centuries of family history (dated 1770-2006; 16.42 cubic feet; 67 boxes, 1 item). The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence between family members. The primary topics discussed in the correspondence concern the relations and friends of the James Clay family, the majority of whom lived in Fayette County, Kentucky, during the nineteenth and twentieth century. Of particular interest is the correspondence of Charles D. Clay, Robert P. Clay, and Thomas Jacob Clay, who were all career soldiers and wrote to the family during various military campaigns. They served in the Spanish American War, the Geronimo Campaign, the First and Second World Wars, and the Korean War. Included in the correspondence are two letters from Henry Clay to his son, James B. Clay. One item of note is receipt for Porter Clay who trades a debt of $50 to John Clay for his right to a negro girl named Lucy to Henry Clay (Box 26, Folder 29). Also notable is correspondence and notes created by Harry Independence Clay, who was involved in the United States expeditions to the Arctic during the 1880s. A large part of the collection comprises research notes, articles, essays about American art and poetry by Susan Clay Sawitzky and William Sawitzky. Additionally, the collection includes poetry manuscripts written by Susan Clay Sawitzky. Legal papers created by the law office of George Nicholas, a law partner of Henry Clay, are included in the collection. The hundreds of photographs are primarily family portraits and of Sawitzky European vacations. Significant persons represented in the correspondence include Confederate General Basil Duke, journalist Desha Breckinridge, and Artic explorer Henry Howgate. Also in the collection is a photo of the officers who captured Geronimo in 1866, including Lt. Leonoard Wood, Capt. Henry Wars Lawton, and Lt. Thomas J. Clay (Box 22, Folder 1).

Restrictions on Access and Use

Conditions Governing Access
Conditions Governing Access note Collection is open to researchers by appointment.
Use Restrictions
Property rights reside with the University of Kentucky. For information about permission to reproduce or publish, please contact Special Collections.

Contents of the Collection

General and single letters, 1770-1998

  • Box 25-27
  • Box 40, 44
The bulk of the General and single letter series consists of newspaper clippings and printed material from the eighteenth through late twentieth centuries. Additionally, the series includes genealogical information, ephemera, drawings, letters, bank notes, and legal documents. For some of the material the provenance is unknown. Some items such as Charles D. Clay, Jr.'s drawing (Box 25, Folder 6) and schoolwork (Box 26, Folder 70) did not constitute enough material for a separate series. Many of the letters are connected in some way to the James B. Clay family, but do not fall into any other series in the papers, such as a letter written to New Mexico Governor Lew Wallace (Box 25, Folder 30) and a letter to J.C.S. Blackburn (Box 25, Folder 31). Finally, the series contains a small amount of Henry Clay material, original and photocopied items, including a financial note (Box 26, Folder 22) and a bill of sale from Porter Clay to Henry Clay concerning interest in a slave girl (Box 26, Folder 29).

Address of a Paris Merchant, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 1
Mme. Vacher Letourueur
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Peter Bissa Runo drawing, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 2
A pastel drawing of a man.
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Clay Heritage newspaper clippings, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 4
Two newspaper clippings dealing with the Clay ancestry. One clipping is a fragment of George Clay’s response to a Lexington Herald news column concerning a donation for the war effort.
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Clay-Pepper genealogy notes, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 5
Notes are in Susan’s handwriting. Culpepper family.
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Charles D. Clay, Jr. drawing, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 6
Charley designed a tank, or motorized armored vehicle years before World War I.
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Exhibit Biographical Cyclopedia of Kentucky Family, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 7
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Reverend Porter Clay and the Clay family, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 8
Letter allegedly written by Porter Clay about the Clay Family.
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Empty envelopes (3), undated

  • Box 25, Folder 9 - 11
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Ephraim McDowell portrait postcard, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 12
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Family news, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 13
Mentions obituary of George Clay, Thomas J. Clay, wedding of Thomas Hart Clay, William Sawitzky
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F. Bret Harte, the Heathen Chinee, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 14
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Jacob crest, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 14A
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Cadet Prayer at West Point, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 3
on cardstock
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Pepper Family Genealogy (McDowell Branch), undated

  • Box 25, Folder 15
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A Renewal Statute and Prohibition Against Allied Trade in Greenland, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 15A
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Slide rule practice, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 15B
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Elsie McDowell Jackson newspaper clipping of wedding, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 15C
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Miscellaneous items, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 15D
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Newspaper clippings, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 15E
Subjects include wounding of Charles D. Clay in the Philippines; deaths of Lucretia Teetee Clay and Charles Clay; pictures of Ashland and Pepper home in Frankfort, KY; pamphlet on Duncan Tavern, Paris, KY.
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George Hudson will (copy), 1770 November 30

  • Box 25, Folder 15F
Will (copy) of Henry Clay’s maternal grandfather.
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Lands belonging to estate of Colonel James Morrison: report of Theodore W. Clay, 1830 July

  • Box 25, Folder 16
Henry Clay sent son Theodore to Missouri to evaluate the lands owned there by Morrison. Notes: land 8 miles north of St. Louis on Mississippi River; land 12 miles east of St Charles on Missouri River; land in counties of St. Charles and Pike. He sold lots at Cape Girardeau per instructions of the executor who was Henry Clay.
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Note about Healey painting, 1845 July 1

  • Box 25, Folder 17
Healey was sent by the King of France to take portraits of some American citizens. Healey presented a copy of the one of Clay to Mrs. Clay.
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Unknown Clay to Judge James Harlan, 1881 April 1

  • Box 25, Folder 18
One of Charles’s brothers asks that Harlan intervene with his brother, Justice Harlan, asking him to use influence with the President to gain an appointment as an army second lieutenant for Charles D. Clay. (Handwriting would suggest that the author is George or James Jr.)
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Berry's Ship, Louisville Courier-Journal newspaper clipping, 1881 July 9

  • Box 25, Folder 19
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Playbill for Woodcock’s Little Game, 1884 March 13

  • Box 25, Folder 20
Playbill for event at Fort Custer, Montana. Note on back.
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Description of a land transaction witnessed, 1889 January 23

  • Box 25, Folder 21
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Survey Report J.M. Corbin, Surveyor, 1896 March 2

  • Box 25, Folder 22
Three copies of surveyor’s report on a piece of land about four miles south west of Lexington on the south side of the Versailles Turnpike. It sounds like the farm that Charles and Ria buy later with a part of her inheritance.
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William A. Turner v. Mary W. Anderson et. al., Appelants, 1911 July 12

  • Box 25, Folder 23
Supreme Court of Missouri. Mary W. Anderson was a daughter of Eugene Erwin and a great-granddaughter of Henry Clay. The legal case was over undue influence she may have had on her husband’s last will brought by children from an earlier marriage.
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William A. Turner v. Mary W. Anderson et.al., Appelants, 1914 July 2

  • Box 25, Folder 24
Supreme Court of Missouri. A second suit dealing with the will of William Anderson. Mary Webster Anderson was a great-granddaughter of Henry Clay.
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War Department Special Orders No. 125, 1925 July 27

  • Box 25, Folder 25
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Connecticut Portraits by Ralph Earl: 1751-1801, 1935 August 1-October 15

  • Box 25, Folder 26
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Christmas letter, circa 1900

  • Box 25, Folder 27
Address is to Newtown Scott County. Ria Clay’s sister married a Clay Hatchell and lived around Newtown. Little boys would be Charley and Bob.
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Fletcher Johnston to an unknown Clay family member, 1883 May 18

  • Box 25, Folder 28
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Arthur M. Rutledge to Colonel, 1884 May 24

  • Box 25, Folder 29
Thanks the recipient (probably Charles or Thomas from contents of letter) for an invitation to come to Lexington. He mentions an invitation from your mother and brother Jim. He cannot come because of a previously planned trip.
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D. Meriwether to Gov. Lew Wallace, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1880 January 28

  • Box 25, Folder 30
A letter of introduction. Clay is thinking about Santa Fe as a home. He is involved in the wool industry at the time. Meriwether introduces him as a grandson of the statesman Henry Clay who is worthy of the name.
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W.B. Haza to J.C.S. Blackburn, 1883 May 3

  • Box 25, Folder 31
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Sturgeon, Clements & Co. receipt, 1864 September 5

  • Box 25, Folder 32
R. H. Ogburn; firm holds bag of gold worth $1018.33.
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Ella M. Williams to Charles Clay, Jr., 1912 December 5

  • Box 25, Folder 34
Interesting letter from the mistress of the private school attended by Clay children. Col. Clay wants the boys trained for West Point. The key lesson is in discipline, she says, and Charley has been showing a lack of it in ill-prepared lessons. She has rebuked him and his honor has been challenged.
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University of Kentucky Bulletin, Department of University Extension, 1926 June 1

  • Box 25, Folder 35
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Lecture Catalog New York University, 1940-1941

  • Box 25, Folder 36
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A Tribute to Mr. Clay by James F. Hopkins, 1955 August 1

  • Box 25, Folder 37
Hopkins delivered an address at Ashland as a part of a program presented by the Henry Clay Memorial Foundation and the University of Kentucky.
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Ladies of the Seaman’s Friend Society to Mrs. H. Clay, 1848 March 1

  • Box 25, Folder 38
Note about a visit from Henry Clay to Philadelphia.
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Bill Adamson to William Blanford, 1996 December 5

  • Box 26, Folder 1
Adamson is trying to contact Bill Blanford, a cousin to his mother, about family genealogy.
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Pauline Tressilian to Bill Adamson, 1997 March 1

  • Box 26, Folder 2
Writing for Bill Blanford, Tressilian explains her role and the present condition of Bill and Elizabeth. Some family genealogy.
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Newspaper clipping, horse race in Montreal, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 3
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Newspaper clipping on death of Captain Richard Pike, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 4
Account of the death of an arctic explorer.
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Treasury Notes by authorization of Congress, 1776 April 2

  • Box 26, Folder 5
Forty shilling Caroll Currency note; Four dollar continental currency; and Carolina currency 6 and 4 dollar notes. Pasted to a backing.
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Portait of a woman, Inscription Great-Grandmother Benjamin Hensley, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 6
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Drawing of a woman, Prudence Culbertson Hensley, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 7
According to the note, she was born 1790, died 1878. She would be an ancestor of Maria Hensley Pepper (Mrs. Charles D.) Clay.
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Newspaper clipping, Ashland-Balgowan trip, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 8
Undated clipping about a visit to Ashland and Balgowan. The article mentions Dr. Tom Bullock (Nettie McDowell’s husband), Tom and George Clay, and Col. Milton Young. The article also talks about libraries and artifacts relating to Henry Clay.
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Newspaper clippings, fragments, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 9
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Newspaper map of Kentucky, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 10
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Newspaper clippings, poems, literary items, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 11
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Newspaper clipping, photograph of Kaiser Wilhelm, Cincinnati Enquirer, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 12
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Newspaper clipping, Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 13
Corrections of stories about Henry Clay, specifically the payment of a $25,000 debt owed by Clay and paid by New Orleans Merchants. Writing style and glorification of Clay is similar to that of Lucretia Hart Teetee Clay, a great-granddaughter.
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Property search, 3330 Versailles Road, copy e-mail: Bill Labach to Lindsey Apple and Ned Boyajian, 1998 March 20

  • Box 26, Folder 14
Labach did a title search after the Lexington Herald called the property the John Clay house. In fact, it was the house constructed by Charles D. Clay in 1903.
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Map of Naval Stations in the Pacific Ocean, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 15
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Newspaper clipping by A. H. Tarvin, Story of Joel T. Hart’s Love Tragedy from Which Was Born Statue of Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 16
Recounts broken love affair of Hart with a young woman in Lexington. If it had been consummated, he would never have gone to Italy and thus become a significant sculptor.
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John Winn to Col. Thomas Hart, Sr., 1799 November 27

  • Box 26, Folder 17
Photocopy. Winn gives an update on his sale of Hart’s land and his attempts to sell other parcels. Noted that he had trouble with the cattle and was willing to reimburse Hart for them.
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Empty envelopes, Mrs. James B. Clay, Ned Boyajian, 1880, 1993

  • Box 26, Folder 18
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Ashland, Home of Henry Clay brochure, 1958-1959

  • Box 26, Folder 19
A brochure about Ashland. It lists the board members and also the artifacts that decorate each room.
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Lexington Herald newspaper clipping, Clay property, 1998 March 17

  • Box 26, Folder 20
This is the article referred to in P roperty search, 3330 Versailles Road. in which the house was said to have belonged to John Clay when it actually belonged to Charles D. Clay.
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Charles Jacob newspaper clipping [ Courier Journal], 1976 March 7

  • Box 26, Folder 21
Inquiry in a column titled as a matter of fact… Note is by Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Note (financial) to Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 22
Signature of Thomas Hart on back.
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Copy of portrait of Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 23
Portrait is of Clay in old age.
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Newspaper clipping, 1994 February 10

  • Box 26, Folder 24
Photo and story of a red-tailed hawk. The Boyajians were dedicated bird watchers.
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Henry Clay engraving by Analectic Magazine, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 25
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Henry Clay Campaign decal, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 26
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Newspaper clipping of Henry Clay funeral procession through New York City, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 27
Contains picture and account of funeral.
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Newspaper clipping, Christian Science Monitor, Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 28
Clipping contains picture of Clay in old age and an article titled Clay and Bolivar Linked in Ideas of Venezuelans. Article relates to creation of a sculpture of Clay in Caracas.
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Porter Clay sale to Henry Clay of interest in negro girl, 1800 April 5

  • Box 26, Folder 29
Porter Clay trades a debt of $50 to John Clay for his right to a negro girl named Lucy to Henry Clay.
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University Book Store (Lexington) sales jacket, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 30
Sales Jacket for Waterman’s (Ideal) Fountain Pen
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Letter fragments Kate [Jones] and May or Mary, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 31
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Newspaper clipping of Lily Langtry, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 32
Note by Elizabeth Blanford says her mother looked like the actress.
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Willard Rouse Jillson, Romance and Reality: Notes and Identifications of Locale and Characters in Robert Burns Wilson’s Novel: Until the Day Break, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 33
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Findings of Board of Officers Fort Snelling, Minnesota, 1923 April 24

  • Box 26, Folder 34
Gives details of Charley’s death and declares circumstances under which it occurred unknown. Assumed his death occurred in line of duty and not of his own willful misconduct.
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Zachary Taylor to Henry Clay Copy, 1847 March 1

  • Box 26, Folder 35
A copy of the letter Zachary Taylor sent to Henry Clay after the death of Henry Clay Jr. at the Battle of Buena Vista.
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[Miss L W----] to Mr. Monroe, 1861 June 30

  • Box 26, Folder 36
The note says if she thinks these worthy of a place in your paper please insert them. Claims they were written by a friend in Nashville and appear to be bitter takes on freedom, the Star Spangled Banner, etc, perhaps due to the Civil War.
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Miscellaneous Items: Addresses, Genealogy, etc., undated

  • Box 26, Folder 37
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Ann Hunt Bartlett, The Poetry Review, to Ralph Fletcher Seymour, 1925 April 22

  • Box 26, Folder 38
Bartlett thanks him for calling her attention to Susan Clay’s first book of poetry.
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Mrs. Thomas Hart Clay bill for coal, 1870 May 24

  • Box 26, Folder 39
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The Slave Prince newspaper clipping, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 40
An article about Ibrahima, an African prince enslaved in America. Article saved undoubtedly because Henry Clay involved in effort to return him to Africa.
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Renovation of Ashland, newspaper clipping, Lexington Herald, 1992 September 5

  • Box 26, Folder 41
Article announces the reopening of Ashland after major renovation.
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Newspaper clipping on the Treaty of Ghent, Daily Telegraph, 1914 December 24

  • Box 26, Folder 42
The article celebrates a century of peace with Great Britain.
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Unrelated newspaper clippings, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 43
Two clippings are about the military during the Spanish American War.
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Question by descendant regarding Henry Clay, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 44
Accompanied by small drawing.
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German booklet Deustschland, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 45
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Drawing titled An Hawaiian Princess, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 46
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Hammond’s new map of Europe [pre-World War II], undated

  • Box 26, Folder 47
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R. H. Haslam pony Bob Card, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 48
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Ashland Post Card, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 49
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Horsemen’s Headquarters Lexington, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 50
Lexington business card, advertising horses of all kinds for sale.
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Francis Burton Harrison, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 51
Gentleman’s card
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Elizabeth Tristram, Lives of Webster and Clay, A. Owen Publishing co., 1911

  • Box 26, Folder 52
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Common Forest Trees of Kentucky, State Department of Agriculture, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 53
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Acussere Anatomie des Pferdes, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 54
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Wycliffe Woods, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 55
In Susan’s hand there is a note about the old Wycliffe place and an area known as Wycliffe Woods
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Democracy: the Basis for World-Order, by Frederick D. Bramhall, The University of Chicago War Papers, No. 3, 1918

  • Box 26, Folder 56
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Luggage tags Europe trip, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 57
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Travel document unidentified woman, 1924 January 10

  • Box 26, Folder 58
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Captain Richard M. Dick Redd photograph, newspaper clipping, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 59
Dick Redd was a Confederate veteran who feared the youth would forget. Mrs. Blanford said he would ride on to the University campus, rear his horse, and give out a rebel yell just to remind them. He attended a series of Civil War reunions.
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Taylor family genealogy, newspaper clipping, Frances M. Smith, About Our Ancestors, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 60
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Kentucky county notes, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 61
Document labeled Plans for ride. It includes names of towns or features of specific counties. Handwriting unidentified.
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Muhammad Ali’s Kentucky Roots by John Egerton, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 62
Egerton traces Ali’s alleged connection to Henry Clay.
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Geronimo newspaper clippings, The Arizona Republic, 1997 August 9, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 63
The Arizona Republic article is based on Mexican memories of his raids. The second article describes attempt by FBI to seize a Geronimo headdress from a Leighton Deming.
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Newspaper clippings, 1945

  • Box 26, Folder 64
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Honoring Henry Clay, newspaper clipping, New York Times, 1929 May 11

  • Box 26, Folder 65
Picture is of a ceremony at New York University honoring eight immortals. Statue of Henry Clay and Susan Clay Sawitzky on stage are identified. The identification of Susan is correct.
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Buchanan to Col. Thomas Hart, 1792 August 15

  • Box 26, Folder 66
Requests a response to an enclosed letter from Col. Hamilton of Norfolk, but the letter is not included. It may be a challenge to a duel.
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Grandmother to Lucy S. Clay, 1932

  • Box 26, Folder 67
Birthday card from either Mrs. Charles D. Clay or Mrs. Martindale.
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Drawings, Robert Pepper Clay, Jr., undated

  • Box 26, Folder 68
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Envelopes, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 69
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Charles D. Clay, Jr., school work, undated

  • Box 26, Folder 70
An essay on a military battle and algebra problem.
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Sterling family genealogy material, undated

  • Box 27, Folder 1
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German scrapbook and German newspaper clippings, undated

  • Box 27, Folder 1A
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Antiques magazine, 1932 May 1

  • Box 27, Folder 2
Magazine containing Susan Clay Sawitzky’s article Another Miniature by Gilbert Stuart.”
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International Studio magazine, 1931 April 1

  • Box 27, Folder 3
Magazine containing William Sawitzky’s article Re-Discovery of a Lost Gilbert Stuart.
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Laura Starling Pepper application for membership to the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, undated

  • Box 27, Folder 4
National Number 172165.
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Daniel Boone to Col. Rochester and Lady (Copy), 1789 May 7

  • Box 27, Folder 5
Announces a trip he is taking and talks about Indian raids that have killed a number of settlers.
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Invitations to call Mrs. Faulds, Mrs. Badger, Mrs. Shreve, Miss Shreve, Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Henning, undated

  • Box 44, Folder 73
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Invitation, undated

  • Box 44, Folder 74
Invitation to Wedding of Sunshine Harris and Thruston Ballard Jan 25 , [1883], to Charles D. Clay. See William and Mary Quarterly, Volume 10.
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Mr. and Mrs. Castleman, invitation to call, undated

  • Box 44, Folder 75
Mentions a Miss Breckinridge.
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Invitation from The Democracy of Fayette County, 1884 July 16

  • Box 44, Folder 76
An invitation to a Kentucky Barbecue on the 29th. It is signed by W.C.P. Breckinridge, C. J. Bronston, Mat Walton, D.L. Price, S.G. Sharp, W. P. Kimball, H.C. Payne, and C. L Albotee(?).
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Niece Lucretia to John M. Clay, undated

  • Box 40, Folder 11
Thank you for a gift. It appears to be Thomas H. Clay’s Lucretia because it is addressed from Mansfield and the gift was received by Harry. Thomas H. Clay had a son named Harry.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1917-1999

  • Box 28
  • Box 25
  • Box 44
The Elizabeth Clay Blanford series comprises correspondence, a written composition, genealogical material, and newspaper clippings generated or collected by Elizabeth Clay Blanford. Correspondence makes up the bulk of the series. Most of the letters relate to genealogy and family stories, reflecting Blanford's interest in documenting the Clay family history. A small portion of the letters, particularly the ones written to her brother, Robert P. Clay, concern her young adulthood and college years at the University of Kentucky. The series also contains a biographical sketch of Lucretia Teetee Clay written by Elizabeth Clay Blanford.

General and single letters, 1917-1999

  • Box 25, 28

Mrs. T. Blanford to William Blanford, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 39
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Child’s drawings Elizabeth Clay Blanford, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 40
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La Petite Elizabeth Clay Blanford, Copy, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 41
A biographical sketch of Lucretia Hart (Teetee) Clay.
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La Petite, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 42
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Poems by Elizabeth Starling Clay, undated

  • Box 25, Folder 43
One poem is titled An Incident. The second is a love poem.
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Clay-McDowell Genealogical Connection (Elizabeth Clay Blanford), undated

  • Box 28, Folder 1
One page statement of connection between the Clay and McDowell families.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford note, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 5
Note describes an attached newspaper clipping from the Herald which she dates March 20, 1921. It is the event where Carol Sax of the University Art Department introduced Susan to William Sawitzky.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Major Charles D. Clay, 1917 July 19

  • Box 25, Folder 44
Talks about an afternoon walking in the area around Frankfort with her cousins Elizabeth and Lyne and her brothers, Bob and Charley. Climbed hills named The Devils Backbone, Fort Hill, and Barrett’s Hill. Saw the Confederate trenches on Fort Hill and could see into Frankfort to the Capital and the church (Presbyterian) across from her Grandmother’s house.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Ty, 1934 October 31

  • Box 25, Folder 45
Ty (unknown); handwriting is that of Elizabeth Blanford and the stationery has her initials on it.
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Elizabeth S. Clay to Mrs. Robert P. Clay, 1944

  • Box 25, Folder 43A
newspaper clipping. Copy of a page from the New York times October 16, 1944. Article on support of Times for Franklin D. Roosevelt.
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The Irvington Herald, 1955 September 20

  • Box 28, Folder 3
Contains an announcement of a wedding Bill and Elizabeth Blanford attended.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Cleo Dawson Smith, 1982 June 21

  • Box 28, Folder 2
Elizabeth sent a newspaper clipping on the publication of Filson Club #14, the Clay Family genealogy. She also sent Lucy Boyajian’s address. Lucy was Elizabeth’s niece.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Cleo Dawson Smith, 1982 July 2

  • Box 28, Folder 4
Thank you note for gift of an Ashland pendant. She mentions the Filson Club publication of Clay genealogy and a Christian Science issue.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Woodridge Spears, 1983 May 11

  • Box 25, Folder 46
A short note containing a draft letter from Susan Clay to William Sawitzky renewing their friendship. She had broken off their relationship as a promise to her mother. The letter sent to Sawitzky is in the collection.
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Elizabeth Blanford to Mr. and Mrs. Victor Williams, 1988

  • Box 28, Folder 6
Letter never posted but contains an Adjutant General’s report on Charley’s death and a note to Mr. and Mrs. Williams. [Mrs. Blanford took the death of her much loved brother very hard. On the yearly anniversary she would become extremely depressed, calling or writing close friends and crying about his loss.]
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford obituary, 1999

  • Box 28, Folder 7
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Lindsey Apple, 1983-1988

  • Box 28

Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Lindsey Apple, 1983 June 9

  • Box 28, Folder 8
Mrs Blanford periodically sent boxes of papers to Apple who wrote the biography of Susan Clay Sawitzky. The sketches are in the collection. William Anderson was a cousin in the Erwin branch and married Lucy Chenault, a member of an old and distinguished family in Lexington. The trip to New York was Susan’s attempt to publish her poetry. She had far too much fun to suit her mother. Letters in the collection refer to the trip and some of the people she met. The photographs mentioned are in the collection. Woodridge Spears wrote an article for the Filson Club about Susan and her poetry and published a book of poems titled The Circling Thread. The Worcester Art Museum Annual is in the collection.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Lindsey Apple, 1988 January 23

  • Box 28, Folder 9
Newspaper clippings from the Lexington Morning Herald, the Lexington Daily Leader, and the Louisville Courier Journal regarding Charles D. Clay during the Spanish American War and the Philippine Insurrection.
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Mariah Pepper Clay (Mrs. Charles D. Clay), 1923-1939

  • Box 28

Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1923 July 28

  • Box 28, Folder 14
Elizabeth is visiting Susan in Samford; Mrs. Sammis (Susan’s neighbor); Old Charley (a servant); Mrs Williams (Susan’s landlord); Mr. Cesare (a literary friend of Susan); Lizzie (Mrs. Clay’s sister)
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Elizabeth Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1931 October 21

  • Box 28, Folder 10
Elizabeth is visiting, probably in Forks of the Elkhorn, just outside Frankfort. Writes of swimming and roasting marshmallows.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1931 November 20

  • Box 28, Folder 11
Visiting Bob at Fort Sill, Okla.; Lucy is Bob’s daughter. Capt Gaffey was a friend of Bob; An American Tragedy.
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Elizabeth Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1932 May 27

  • Box 28, Folder 12
Elizabeth writes to tell her mother she is attending a horse show. Bob will play in an indoor polo match.
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Elizabeth Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1939 April 17

  • Box 28, Folder 13
Elizabeth describes a visit in Georgia. Too much bridge playing for her tastes.
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Robert P. Clay, 1924-1929

  • Box 28

Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Robert P. Clay, 1924 March 15

  • Box 28, Folder 15
Metzie includes news of home and friends. Col. Clay is arranging a contract with a Mr. Eades to raise tobacco on shares. Rucker Cleveland has a job as a councilor at a camp in Tennessee for the summer. Sissies net baby pictures of Brother. The family thinks Elizabeth’s little Johnnie looks like Charley at that age. (Pepper relatives) She urges him to write.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Robert P. Clay, 1924 May 26

  • Box 28, Folder 16
Elizabeth, or Metzie, tells Bob about Susan’s impending trip to the Confederate Reunion in Memphis. She will be joined by Louisanna (Gipson), Ida (Moore) and Dunster Foster. She still plans to visit him at West Point. News that Fred Shaw had been attacked and inured by another man. (Fred Shaw was Susan’s beau when she was in school)
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Elizabeth Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 June 22

  • Box 28, Folder 17
She describes the activities at a pageant at Harrodsburg. Mentions Billy Breckinridge. Also mentions her proposed trip to West Point.
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Elizabeth Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 July 27

  • Box 28, Folder 18
Elizabeth is confronted with complications about a trip to see Bob. The critical issue is chaperonage.
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Elizabeth Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 September 28

  • Box 28, Folder 19
Elizabeth tells Bob about joining the Chi Omega sorority at the university and the classes she is taking. She wanted to tutor children in her spare time but had no clients. She mentions that Balboa, perhaps a Clay horse, had been scratched in a race due to injury.
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Elisabeth S. Clay Blanford to Robert P. Clay, 1925 February 2

  • Box 28, Folder 20
She writes about her experiences at the University of Kentucky and the grades she thinks she made first semester. She mentions going to a basketball game against the University of West Virginia with a Mr. Franklin. She also asks if he saw an eclipse and the planets Jupiter, Venus and Mercury.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Robert P. Clay, 1929 February 2

  • Box 28, Folder 21
Elizabeth writes on Bob’s 21st birthday from Frankfort. She mentions her cousin Elizabeth. She claims that Frankfort seems quite taken with Dickens’ plays. Says Bob is now old enough to vote for the Democrats.
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Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1937

  • Box 28

Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1937 August 20

  • Box 28, Folder 22
Postcard
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1937 August 25

  • Box 28, Folder 23
Postcard
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To Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1931-1987

  • Box 28, 44

Josephine Funkhauser to Elizabeth Clay, 1931 December 4

  • Box 28, Folder 24
Dr. Funkhauser was a well known and highly respected professor at the University of Kentucky. Josephine may be his wife or daughter.
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Glanville Terrell to Mrs. Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1932 December 20

  • Box 28, Folder 26
Christmas card. Terrell was associated with the University.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford from Irma Clay, 1933 October 23

  • Box 28, Folder 25
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Frank Fowler to Elizabeth Clay, 1934 August 13

  • Box 28, Folder 27
Frank Fowler was at the university when Elizabeth attended. He tried to get a play she wrote published. Star-ling refers to her middle name, Starling, the maiden name of her maternal grandmother.
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Elizabeth Lizzie Pepper to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1941 March 27

  • Box 44, Folder 78
Chatty news. Mentions Margaret Preston; P.P. Johnson. Bob Clay
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Millie Lawson to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1942 October 22

  • Box 28, Folder 28
Thanks Elizabeth for a hat she sent her. Millie did not read or write. Her daughter Susan usually read the correspondence of Elizabeth or Susan and responded for her mother.
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Virginia C. Peter to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1948 May 3

  • Box 28, Folder 29
Invitation to dinner with Mrs. Peter, Lyne Williams and Charlotte Curran (daughter of Kitty Hope). Lunch at the Arts Club.
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Millie Lawson to Elizabeth Blanford, 1950 February 14

  • Box 28, Folder 30
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Susan Lawson Brown to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1981 October 16

  • Box 28, Folder 31
Susan Brown, the daughter of Millie Lawson wrote about Elizabeth Blanford’s plan to purchase a tombstone for Millie’s grave. Elizabeth Blanford later went to Kentucky for a dedication ceremony, and in her speech declared herself one of Millie’s children, a reference to verses in Proverbs. The letter speaks to relations between the Clays and African American servants.
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Mary E. Quinn to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1983 September 12

  • Box 28, Folder 32
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Laura Kennedy to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1984 July 11

  • Box 28, Folder 33
At Elizabeth’s request, Mrs. Kennedy recalled memories of her cousin, Susan Clay Sawitzky. The description is quite revealing and appears accurate in as far as it goes.
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Henry C. List to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1987 May 14

  • Box 28, Folder 34
A descendant of Henry Clay through the Erwin branch, List served as Chair of the board of the Henry Cay Memorial Foundation. Elizabeth gave many of the artifacts left to her to Ashland.
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Boyajian, 1977-1993

  • Box 28

Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Ned Boyajian, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 35
Ned sent her questions about the family but she misplaced them. She includes a story of Charley Clay and a stray dog.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Lucy Boyajian, 1977 January 7

  • Box 28, Folder 38
Delighted that Lucy is moving back to New Jersey. She discovered volumes of Calvin Colton and wants to give them to Lucy’s sons [Robert and Ned]. Tells her about the publication of Clay correspondence by the University of Kentucky. She thinks the collection contains the letters sold to the Library of Congress by Uncle George. She recalls Aunt Teetee sitting by the fire putting them in order.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Ned Boyajian, 1993 February 4

  • Box 28, Folder 36
Tells a Christmas story about her mother, Ned’s grandmother. (Mrs. Blanford was delighted that Ned took some interest in the family history.)
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford to Ned Boyajian, 1993 March 23

  • Box 28, Folder 37
Mrs. Blanford relays stories of the family to her niece’s son. They are about the Civil War.
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Charles D. Clay, 1867-1936

  • Box 28-33, 45, 60, 63
The Charles D. Clay series comprises correspondence, military orders, receipts, financial papers, newspaper clippings, and ephemera which document Charles D. Clay's family and military life as well as his business concerns and interests. The bulk of the series consists of letters written to his wife, Mariah Pepper Clay, while serving in the military, primarily while serving in the Spanish American War and during the Philippine Invasion. The series also includes letters to his children; his mother, Susan M. Clay; his ex-fiancee, Lucy Scott; and his business associates such as Basil Duke and Samuel H. Jones. Notable items include two letters sent to him by Charles Jacob, his brother-in-law and mayor of Louisville (Box 32, Folders 66 and 69). The letters discuss his military service, family affairs, his experiences in the wool buying industry, and the breeding of thoroughbred horses. The series also contains military orders from Charles' time in the military as well as receipts and financial materials.

General and single letters, 1873-1936

  • Box 28-29, 45

Calling card of Colonel and Mrs. Donald Clay, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 39
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Calling card of Lt. Col. Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 40
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Charles D. Clay notes on battle, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 41
Handwriting appears to be that of Charles D. Clay.
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Charles D. Clay receipt for tobacco, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 42
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Receipt Virginia Tyler, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 43
Miss Virginia Tyler tutored the older children of Charles and Mariah Clay.
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The Case of Major-General Adelbert Cronkhite, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 74
A pamphlet sent to Colonel Charles D. Clay at the time of Charley’s death at Fort Snelling, Minnesota.
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Charles D. Clay calling cards, undated

  • Box 28, Folder 77
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Christmas card from Charley and Elizabeth Clay to a Servant, undated

  • Box 29, Folder 4
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Town lots sold for taxes Charles D. Clay, 1873-1875

  • Box 28, Folder 44
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Tax list, 1873-1874

  • Box 28, Folder 45
Taxes on lots in Clay subdivision Louisville
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Financial Statement Duke & Richards Law firm, 1879 May 23

  • Box 28, Folder 72
The document is an accounting of sales, taxes, and fees for sale of town lots in Louisville.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucy Scott, 1879 July 6

  • Box 28, Folder 48
Clay was seriously involved with a young woman named Lucy Scott in the 1870s. Subjects: Harshness of West; efforts of a young man to make a living; marriage; Gentlemanly manners; sense of duty. Essentially breaking engagement.
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Letter of Authorization for W.C. Houston, Jr. & Co. for Charles D. Clay, 1879 September 24

  • Box 28, Folder 49
Charles Clay is authorized to solicit consignments from any party not already shipping to them. He is paid two hundred dollars for every 100,000 pounds
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Letter of Authorization for W.C. Houston, Jr. & Co. for Charles D. Clay, 1879 September 24

  • Box 28, Folder 80
Charles Clay is authorized to purchase wool for the company.
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Charles D. Clay to brother (probably Harry), 1881 February 13

  • Box 28, Folder 50
Charles writes to tell him he is in Lexington. The wool business has been a failure so he is back in Lexington living with brother Jim and Eliza and studying for the exam and hopes to seek an appointment from President Garfield. He mentions that Tom and George are waiting for him to go to Jim’s so the only brother left is Harry who is in the Arctic. He also mentions a long diary that Teetee kept and sent to him. That diary is in Harry Clay’s papers.
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Charles D. Clay to Mr. Justice John Harlan, 1881 May 4

  • Box 28, Folder 51
Charles Clay asks for use of Harlan’s influence with President Garfield to secure for him an appointment in the army. He notes that he is grandson of Henry Clay and son of James B. Clay but mentions service of grandfather and Uncle Henry Clay Jr to the nation. His mother has written to David Davis. They think Secretary of War Robert Lincoln is misinterpreting the Statute of 1878. Letter indicates a sense of entitlement.
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Orders No. 2 U.S. Infantry and Cavalry School Fort Leavenworth, 1887 February 9

  • Box 28, Folder 52
List of participants includes Charles D.Clay
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Certificate: President of the United States, 1891 March 19

  • Box 28, Folder 46
Charles D. Clay appointed First Lieutenant of Infantry by the President.
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Charles D. Clay to William Heryford, 1891 July 30

  • Box 28, Folder 53
The handwriting appears to be that of Charles. He is answering a letter to James B. Clay (Jr.) The letter is about property in Missouri that had been owned by Henry Clay and he list several tracts of 160 acres each totaling 1440 acres that Clay paid taxes on as late as 1831. He tells Heryford he cannot tell him what they are willing to do on the matter until he has conferred with the heirs of his uncle Thomas H. Clay.
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Charles D. Clay: Military Orders, 1896 August 22

  • Box 28, Folder 54
Charles was ordered to go from Fort Apache, Arizona to Holbrook then report on the condition of the road. He could then take leave of absence.
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Clay–Pepper Marriage newspaper clipping, 1896

  • Box 28, Folder 68
Charles D. Clay and Mariah Hensley Pepper were married on September 8, 1896.
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Checks on Merchants and Manufacturers National Bank, Columbus Ohio Charles D. Clay, 1898 October 3-December 23

  • Box 28, Folder 47
Payees: Norton & Company, Effie Thornton, Deposit Bank of Frankfort, Ky; T.L. Smith; Third National Bank Lexington, Ky; W.H. Averill; Biscoe Hindman; T.J. Clay; Parisian Cloak Co; Arthur Johnson; Columbus Transfer Company; C.F. Humphrey; W.D. Davis; Hatfield and Sons; T.S. Menough.
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Special Orders #112 Headquarters Dept of the Pacific and Eight Army Corps, 1899 April 25

  • Box 28, Folder 55
Grants leave of absence to Charles D. Clay after his battle wound to return to the U.S.
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Brig. Gen. Robert H. Hall to Adjutant General, 2nd Div, 8th Corps, 1899 April 26

  • Box 29, Folder 3
copy. Recommending recognition for Charles D. Clay for gallantry and good conduct. Notes that he was wounded.
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Charles D. Clay to unknown, 1899 August 9

  • Box 28, Folder 56
The first and last parts of the letter are missing. Charles recounts a military trek in the vicinity of Bordeaux, Wyoming.
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Newspaper clipping Charles D. Clay, [1899]

  • Box 29, Folder 1
Charles returned after wounded in Philippines. He will go to New York for medic al evaluation.
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Charles D. Clay to T. L. Smith, 1900 February 16

  • Box 28, Folder 78
Charles writes to thank Smith and his father for securing an appointment for him He describes in detail his wound and his love of his family. He asks Smith to pay some bills for him. Tom Smith’s wife is Ria Clay’s sister. A note on the back says Elizabeth Smith, Tom’s daughter, sent the letter to Bob Clay.
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Charles D. Clay to Thomas J. Clay, 1900 March 23

  • Box 28, Folder 73
A note expressing thanks for an up-date on health of Susan M. Clay. Charles included a letter from the man who cared for him when he was wounded in the Philippines. (that letter is in the collection.)
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Pinnie Smith to Charles D. Clay, 1900 October 1

  • Box 45, Folder 3
Pinnie writes a long letter about her impending return to the Philippines to rejoin her husband. She had accompanied Charles back to the mainland after his wound.
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Charles D. Clay to G.L. Smith, 1907 April 29

  • Box 28, Folder 57
Charles at Clemson. This is a receipt for one gallon of ice cream.
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Cancelled checks on Charles D. Clay, 1909 November 2, 1914 January 2

  • Box 28, Folder 58
Green Miller was an African American who worked for him; paying advance on wages.
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Blueprint of easement for pipe line owned by Charles D. Clay, 1913 February 1

  • Box 28, Folder 79
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Charles D. Clay to the President of the United States, 1913 April 5

  • Box 28, Folder 59
Letter of recommendation for Desha Breckinridge. Clay introduces himself as the grandson of Henry Clay and son of James B. Clay.
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Charles D. Clay financial documents, 1914

  • Box 28, Folder 60
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Equitable Life Assurance Society to Charles D. Clay, 1915 December 17

  • Box 28, Folder 67
Letter explaining how much money could be borrowed on their life insurance policy. Copy of letter asking for the loan and enclosing the paperwork. Not the first loan he had taken on the policy.
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Receipt from Equitable Life Assurance Society to Charles D. Clay, 1917 September 30

  • Box 28, Folder 61
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War Department, Office of Chief of Finance to Charles D. Clay, 1920 September 1

  • Box 28, Folder 66
Copy of letter from a close friend though unnamed regarding a discrepancy of pay that Clay is trying to clear up.
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Charles D. Clay to General George B. Duncan, 1922 December 30

  • Box 28, Folder 76
Clay contacts Duncan after spending three days in Washington talking to General Davis. He recounts the circumstances surrounding Charley’s death insisting that Charley would not have committed suicide. The second page of the letter is missing. Additionally the letter was in an envelope addressed to Colonel Charles D. Clay from the Department of Justice in Minnesota and containing also a letter from the investigator M. J. Johannis.
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Charles D. Clay to General R.C. Davis, 1923 January 21

  • Box 28, Folder 65
copy of telegram. Clay writes to protest the findings of the Board of Officers at Fort Snelling on the cause of death of Charles D. Clay Jr.
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R.C. Davis to Col. Charles D. Clay telegram, 1923 March 9

  • Box 28, Folder 75
Informs Clay that the Secretary of War has ordered the Board of Officers to reconvene and further investigate Charley’s death.
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Charles D. Clay to General R.C. Davis, 1923 March 13

  • Box 28, Folder 62
Telegram requesting permission to be represented by counsel before the Board of Officers investigating Charley’s death.
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Charles D. Clay to George Clay, after 1923

  • Box 28, Folder 63
Charles refers to loss of one child. Charles Jr died in 1923. Letter probably dates from early 1930s. People mentioned: Mary (Mrs. Thomas H.) Clay, Thomas H. Clay Jr (Mrs. Blanford has erased part of the name to protect his reputation); George Clay (brother). Subjects: Family loyalty; importance of ancestry, “blood.”
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Charles D. Clay to General R.C. Davis, 1924 January 24

  • Box 28, Folder 64
Expresses desire to visit Washington in order to confer directly with Davis (about investigation of Charley Jr.’s death). He asks Davis to tell him exactly the finding of the Board at the second hearing.
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Charles Clay Cited for Gallantry newspaper clipping, 1924 April 11

  • Box 28, Folder 70
Clay was notified by the adjutant general that he had been cited for action in Cuba July 1, 1898 and in the Philippines March 5, 1899.
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Colonel Charles D. Clay obituary New York [Times], [1935] November 30

  • Box 28, Folder 69
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Death of Lt. Col. Charles D. Clay New York Times newspaper clipping, 1935 December 1

  • Box 29, Folder 2
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Sale of Charles D. Clay Farm newspaper clipping, [1936]

  • Box 28, Folder 71
Announces ale to Arthur E. Bendelari.
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Mariah Pepper Clay (Mrs. Charles D. Clay), 1895-1918

  • Box 29-31

Charles D. Clay to Maria H. Pepper Clay, 1895

  • Box 29, Folder 5
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Hensley Pepper Clay, 1895 August 2

  • Box 29, Folder 6
Charles asks to privilege to call on her.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1895 August 29

  • Box 29, Folder 7
Charles apologizes for his persistence in trying to convince her to say something that you felt you could not.
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Charles D. Clay to Miss Maria Pepper telegram, 1895 September 3

  • Box 29, Folder 8
May I call to see you tomorrow Wednesday evening?
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Hensley Clay, 1895 October 13

  • Box 29, Folder 9
Charles writes that he has not heard about his request for an extension of his leave but hopes to know something before Tuesday when he sees her. He writes obtusely about saying what needs to be said, apparently a reference to his proposal of marriage.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria H. Pepper Clay, 1895 November 6

  • Box 29, Folder 10
His train arrived too late in Frankfort for him to call. Notes her adversity to seeing guest during the day but asks her not to punish him because the train was late.
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Telegram Charles D Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1895 December 5

  • Box 29, Folder 11
Charles informs Ria that he leaves Lexington on Dec 7.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 January 5

  • Box 29, Folder 12
Letter begins romantically then shifts to the business difficulties of his brother. He agrees with her view that a trip to North Carolina would be good. Recalls a visit in 1893 to the A&M College of Virginia at Blacksburg. He says he was so impressed he has talked to his brothers about going there to live.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 February 2

  • Box 29, Folder 13
Charles writes that Mr. and Mrs. Collins are taking a month at the Hotel Coronado on the coast of California. Marion Lindsay spent some time there with Miss McCook so she could tell Ria about it. He suggests that they might spend some time there net winter. Colonel and Mrs. De Rossy also leaving. Notes that Mrs. De Rossy was impressed with his housekeeping. He expresses delight in photographs of her.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 February 8

  • Box 29, Folder 14
Charles notes death of Robert P. Pepper Jr, Ria’s brother. Note in margin is in hand of Elizabeth Blanford. Charles was remarkably sensitive having lost father and brothers to a variety of causes.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 February 12

  • Box 29, Folder 15
Charles writes with left hand because he had sprained the right one. He writes quite sentimentally. (this may be because of the death of her brother).
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper, 1896 February 17

  • Box 29, Folder 16
Charles’ company has been assigned to Phoenix and he is delighted because of the good weather there compared to Whipple Barracks. He thinks in a year he can obtain the position of military instructor at either Richmond or Georgetown.
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Charles Clay to Maria Pepper, 1896 March 20

  • Box 29, Folder 17
fragment. Charles speaks of George’s financial woes and says he plans to tell Ria all about his financial situation because he intends to be completely honest with her and hide nothing (It will not be true.) He then explains some of the problems. He had let his own debts go in order to help his brother. Susan M. Clay owned a life interest in her father’s trust. Before Charles left home they agreed to let George sell a portion of the estate to pay off his debts. Letter stops there.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper, 1896 March 22

  • Box 29, Folder 18
Charles writes to explain two previous letters. He has told her of his debts because he plans to keep nothing from her. (Given later events that is almost comical) He then speaks of his brother’s debts and is concerns about his family. Tells Ria that a Lieut Johnson appears willing to accept a transfer that will allow Charles to return to the 17th Infantry now stationed at Columbus. He mentions the possibility of going to Georgetown in two years.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 April 25

  • Box 29, Folder 19
He writes of a bad experience on a trip involving a wagon and some mules. He describes fording a river with mules, sand storms. He then writes about a liberty he took with her, blamed it upon leaving civilization and asked for her forgiveness. He has purchased for her some beautiful Navajo blankets, baskets and pre-historic pottery. He mentions Christine (Reynolds).
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 May 14

  • Box 29, Folder 20
Short letter referring to difficulties in Charles’s family. His brother Tom had written him bad news. (George Clay, another brother, suffered serious economic difficulties during this period. In other letters Charles even contemplated postponing his marriage to help his brother.)
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 May 17

  • Box 29, Folder 21
Charles writes from Fort Apache. He alludes to troubling news he has received from home which could keep them apart for a time. He also notes how homesick he is to see her. He presses a small flower in the letter.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 June 27

  • Box 29, Folder 22
Charles begins the letter romantically promising to devote himself to making her forever happy. He then mentions his mother as the least formidable of any woman you have ever known. He notes how dear she is to him and wants Ria to love her. He is grateful that Ria has taken Mrs. Clay and Teetee to meet her mother. He writes romantically for most of the letter. Mentions two ladies from the post who are going on a camping trip of 4 to 5 days with an Indian guide.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 June 28

  • Box 29, Folder 23
Letter about their wedding. Note at end of letter is in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 July 19

  • Box 29, Folder 23A
Charles expresses concern that he has not heard from her. He encourages her to make arrangements for the wedding to suit herself. He knows little about such things. Then suggests that Ria’s minister use the Episcopal service, although he will yield to her slightest objection.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 July 23

  • Box 29, Folder 24
Charles describes a fire in one of the stables and the role of the men in extinguishing it. He suggests the 8th or 9th of September for the wedding.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 2

  • Box 29, Folder 25
Charles writes from Fort Apache, Arizona. Charles thinks her choice of Sept 9 for their marriage is a good one (they married on Sept 8). Letter is very romantic and Charles is trying to be very sensitive. Everything will be done to her wishes. She will really be his— or rather that we really belong to each other. He asks if she remembers one occasion when she had difficulty making him behave himself. Some banter about her expecting him to help with the housework.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 4

  • Box 29, Folder 26
Charles writes a romantic letter saying he hopes to make her the happiest of the happy women and knows she will make him happy. He then speaks briefly of the weather.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 6

  • Box 29, Folder 27
Fatigued by work on a ditch that brings water to the base. Ria has asked him if he will always be as sweet to her as he is now and he assures her he will.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 9

  • Box 29, Folder 28
Charles, at Whipple Barracks, is concerned because he has not had a letter since July 30. Brother Tom has agreed to be his best man. He mentions the Navajo blankets he has purchased for her and an attempt to steal them, but a fellow officer, Irwin, will take care of them. He mentions seeing a dead rattlesnake and the use of skin to make belts. Notes that he has telegrapher her that his leave has been granted then ends letter on a romantic note.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 11

  • Box 29, Folder 29
Charles consoles Ria concerning illness of her grandmother. Charles praises the wedding gown Ria described in an earlier letter and wants to know about her trousseau. He has ordered a full dress uniform from New York. Will try his best to look pretty. His back up uniform is one given him by the cadets of the State College. (Charles had earlier commanded the cadet corps at Kentucky University). Charles assures Ria that his family will love her and that her reserve will disappear when she meets them. He mentions that no one can be around George and feel any reserve.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 14

  • Box 29, Folder 30
Charles sends condolences for the death of Maria’s Mammy. Note on envelope says Mammy was Ria’s Grandmother Starling. He also writes briefly of the wedding and his return to Kentucky from Arizona at the end of the month.
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Charles D. Clay to Maria Pepper Clay, 1896 August 23

  • Box 29, Folder 31
Charles writes his last letter from Fort Apache. He mentions the farewells he has made, and the fact that he is bring several gifts for her.
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Charles Clay To Mrs. Charles Clay, 1896 November 12

  • Box 29, Folder 32
Charles is distraught over Ria’s accident. The accident is described in the hand of Elizabeth Blanford at the end of the letter. Charles twice urges Ria to be more careful for her own wellbeing and for his. He still hopes she can come to Columbus the next Tueday.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1896 November 22

  • Box 29, Folder 33
Charles writes from Columbus Barracks. He mentions the Poland family and Dr. Loving (possibly a relative of Ria’s). Mrs. Poland wants to entertain Ria when she arrives and Charles wants her to arrive soon. The letter was dated a little over two months after their marriage.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 24

  • Box 29, Folder 34
Charles is preparing for Ria to join him at Columbus. The letter contains information on African American servants.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 25

  • Box 29, Folder 35
Charles writes of Ria’s impending arrival. Offers to come all the way to Frankfort if she needs him. He mentions the possible hiring of a woman to cook who will also bring her daughter.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 26

  • Box 29, Folder 36
On Thanksgiving Day Charles is thankful God gave him his darling wife. He talks about the preparations he is making for her arrival.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 28

  • Box 29, Folder 37
Charles expresses concern that Ria’s plans for a cook have fallen through. All else is in readiness for her arrival. He has met a number of people in Columbus, a Mr. Deshler. Dr. Loving, Ria’s relative, is apparently well thought of.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 March 4

  • Box 29, Folder 38
Postcard. Charles in Washington and very tired after a splendid parade. Teetee had been there too. Card addressed to Columbus Barracks, Ohio
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 11

  • Box 29, Folder 39
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 May 15

  • Box 29, Folder 40
Charles writes to Ria at Frankfort. He misses her. He hopes his unit’s target practice will be at Fort Thomas so he can visit her on Sundays. Mentions Mrs. Rogers and Mrs. Lyon. Notes that a visit home had been a sad one but does not say why. He noted that he had read that Lexington Court House had burned. Tells Ria that Tom Smith has left on a week’s leave and wonders if he will stop by Frankfort. (Family was trying, successfully, to match Tom and Pinnie ).
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 May 16

  • Box 29, Folder 41
Charles writes that he attended evening services at Trinity (Episcopal), but understood little of Mr. Atwood’s sermon. A friend, Chubb, agreed. Nora, a former servant, brought a woman that Charles hired at $10 per month. He also mentions a servant named Agnes. He also tells her he is putting away blankets and other winter items and hoping to keep the moths out. He notes a shared homesickness and mentions something he calls the “woman’s friend”. He asked about Louise’s health. A note in the hand of Elizabeth Blanford identifies her as Ria’s maternal aunt.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 May 17

  • Box 29, Folder 42
Charles urges Ria to think positively. He thinks she is depressed. He gives her a pep talk He says he was shocked to read of Preston Thornton’s terrible act. He does not say what the act was but believes Thornton must have been temporarily insane. Mentions that a Mrs. Harris and the Dowdys asked about her.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 May 25

  • Box 29, Folder 43
Note telling her he has arrived safely in Columbus; encourages her to be brave and not to worry.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 26

  • Box 29, Folder 44
Written from Columbus Barracks Charles mentions meeting Mr. Hatchitt and Mr. Macklin in Georgetown. He is interested in a position in the military department at Georgetown College. He talked with the president and a number of professors who seemed favorably disposed. He also notes seeing Dr. Loving who lived in Columbus. Elizabeth Clay Blanford’s note suggest that his sympathies may have related to death of Louise, but Louise was probably Ria’s aunt. Charles writes encouraging lines to Ria in light of her pregnancy.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 May 27

  • Box 29, Folder 45
Short letter expressing pleasure that she is feeling well. He mentions a Miss Desher, Mrs. Lyons and Mrs. Carter from Columbus and implies that she knows them. He mentions a reception for the Army Surgeons and writes warmly of their home.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 28

  • Box 29, Folder 46
Charles writes that he received a letter to her from Lena that was misdirected. It is not enclosed as letter indicates. He had visited Col. and Mrs. Poland and she had asked about ria. He gives his weight at 157 and ¼ pounds.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 29

  • Box 29, Folder 47
He is bored. He mentions the servants who clean. Mentions Capt and Mrs. Rogers, Mrs. Gill, Mrs. Carter. He is anxious for birth of baby.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 May 30

  • Box 29, Folder 48
Charles writes of a quiet Sunday. He took a long walk, attended church. Mentioned Mr. Atwood, the minister and a lecture by an unnamed person on the origin of the Episcopal Church. He plans to practice surveying with Tom Smith. He asks Ria to change the spelling of a man’s name, a Mr. Pigeon, that he had misspelled in his last letter.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 June 1

  • Box 29, Folder 54
The letter discusses the gender of the child Ria is carrying. They call it Harry but Charles assures her he is most concerned that the child be born strong in mind and body, and that Ria remains healthy as well. He has been asked by Mr. Martin of the University to judge a competitive drill by his boys. Mr. Dickinson and Mr. Cordray will also judge. Charles sends a check to pay Ria’s mother money he had borrowed but cannot repay Pin until the end of the month. He sends Ria $5 and urges her to borrow from her mother if she needs more. Mrs. Lyon, Dr. and Mrs Waters, and Mrs. Poland are Columbus people he mentions to her.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 June 4

  • Box 29, Folder 50
He had received a letter from Tom Clay saying Teetee had fainted and cut her head. He thinks she overtaxes herself. He mentions local friends, but letter is very general.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 June 6

  • Box 29, Folder 51
Charles tells Ria that he will visit Minerva Park that evening with Mr. (Tom) Smith to listen to music. He also recounts visiting a cemetery with Capt Rogers where 2260 Confederate soldiers were buried. He laments that they died far from home. He notes that a Mr. Krauss, who had been in the Federal army, originated the custom of decorating the graves. He reveals aspects of the Lost Cause mentality. He gives Ria news of their friends on the post, and implies a relationship between sister-in-law Pin, or Pinnie, and Tom Smith.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 June 7

  • Box 29, Folder 52
Charles writes a general letter. He had visited Col and Mrs. Poland. He tells Ria to mention to Pin the attentiveness of Mr. Michie to Miss Longstreet. Says Pin better hurry back or someone else (Tom Smith) might fall in love.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 June 10

  • Box 29, Folder 53
Discusses the gender of their child Ria thinks it will be a girl. Charles says he will love and cherish a daughter as much as he would a son. He has spent the day relaxing, reading Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. Thinks it contains the most beautiful thoughts in the English language. He and Tom Smith also spent time at a local park. Wants address of Mrs. Morse of Mrs. Rogers.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 13

  • Box 29, Folder 55
Charles has spent the day sleeping and loafing. He took some colomel and so lacks energy. A letter from sister Teetee informed him that the financial affairs of his family have not improved. He calls his uncle, Charles D. Jacob an exceedingly cold blooded and selfish man because he has not helped them.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay (envelope), 1897 June 13

  • Box 29, Folder 56
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 14

  • Box 29, Folder 57
Charles had led his unit on a 7.5 mile march with Hardaway acting as Lieut. and mapmaker. Having a headache he tried Ria’s remedy bromo-seltzer.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 15

  • Box 29, Folder 58
Charles writes of the heat and the difficulty of sleeping. He has written to Pin about developing pictures. He describes a march his men will make. Mr. Hardaway will map the country they pass through.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 June 17

  • Box 29, Folder 59
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 18

  • Box 29, Folder 60
Charles notes a change in the weather then tells Ria that several people asked about her. Notes the engagement of Nettie Belle Smith (Daughter of Milton Smith CEO of L&N Railroad? Apparently there was a touch of scandal involving an alleged promise to Preston Thornton. He encourages Ria and Pin to try developing pictures. Mentions death of Judge Harlan and laments the nature of it.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 19

  • Box 29, Folder 61
Charles complains of the boredom. He notes that his unit will march to Fort Thomas in August. He mentions people she would know. Mrs. Lyon asked about her. He had not seen Mrs. Bradford. Michie, a fellow officer, was pursuing a Miss Longstreet. Mrs. Blanford’s note is accurate. He mentions Dick and Lieut. Whipple of the State-Guard.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 June 23

  • Box 29, Folder 62
He mentions commanding a battalion in field exercises. Plans to return home Friday (June 25). Many ladies are leaving the post for the summer----Burns, Dickinson, and others.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 June 29

  • Box 29, Folder 63
Charles had just returned from Lexington. He mentioned an introduction by Hull Davidson to a Mr. Russell and his daughter and a Miss Hancock of Virgina. Mentions the Confederate Veteran reunion in Nashville. In Lexington h e had visited with his mother and felt good about her health. Wrote of the impending birth. It appears that there was some anxiety on Ria’s part.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 July 2

  • Box 29, Folder 64
Charles mentions that a friend has read John Fox’s new story in Harper’s and is delighted with it. He also relays compliments about Ria and her family from people at Columbus.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 3

  • Box 29, Folder 65
Charles writes an affectionate letter. They have hired a nurse to be with her and expect Dr. Hume to give the proper directions. He mentions the family’s delight that they will name the child Susan if it is a girl. They seem overly concerned about family’s acceptance of Ria as a member of the family.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 4

  • Box 29, Folder 66
Charles complains of the intense heat. He apologizes for not getting a lotion that he was supposed to get for Lizzie. He mentions the engagement of Hardaway to Ethel Atkinson. He also mentions a Mrs. Bradford and a Mrs. Mann.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 July 5

  • Box 29, Folder 67
Charles writes about getting Ria’s coat, napkins, cloths, etc., cleaned and properly stored. He mentions that Michie, tom Smith and Hardaway had been out to Minerva Park. He describes the park, a new casino and a theatre that will seat ten thousand, a restaurant, soda fountain. Etc. Charles is glad that Ria likes the nurse and speaks of the unborn child as Harry.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1897 July 7

  • Box 29, Folder 68
Letter is little more than keeping in touch. Notes a visit of his mother and Teetee to Frankfort.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 13

  • Box 29, Folder 69
Charles mentions that he may be sent to Chicago for a few days but urges her not to worry. (The baby is due soon.)
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 15

  • Box 29, Folder 70
Ria is in Frankfort awaiting the birth of Susan. His letter discusses the weather, his activities, and a party for an old gentleman, Mr. Waters, who is leaving. Charles clearly is hoping the baby will be a boy.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 16

  • Box 29, Folder 71
Charles attempts to relieve Ria’s concern and her depression. He assures her he will come when she requests it. Col. Poland has agreed. He knows nothing more about the Chicago trip his unit is scheduled to make. He received an invitation to Miss Lacey’s wedding.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 18

  • Box 29, Folder 72
Ria is in Frankfort preparing for the birth of Susan. Charles notes a trip to Chicago but assures her he will come as soon as she calls. Mentions several other men whose wives are away—a Mr. Frier and Mr. Grumley.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 19

  • Box 29, Folder 73
Charles is planning a trip to Chicago. Will camp in Washington Park. Wants Ria to telegraph him each day to let him know how she is doing.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 1

  • Box 29, Folder 74
Charles is quite emotional about Ria and their new baby. He implies that it was Ria’s choice to name the baby after his mother, Susan M. Clay. Charles also talks about an issue with a servant revealing his attitudes about servants, African Americans, etc. Mentions a Captain Roberts.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 2

  • Box 29, Folder 75
Charles complains about the weather. He urges Ria to be careful about her health and praises Pinnie for writing to him. He mentions Mrs. Perry and Mrs. Roberts.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 3

  • Box 29, Folder 76
Charles cautions Ria to take care of herself. While she is bedridden Pinnie writes to Charles.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 August 5

  • Box 29, Folder 77
Charles tells Ria how much she means to him and speaks of their daughter Susan. He had received letters from Pin, Ria’s sister Pinnie. He expresses how much he misses her. He mentions the separation and hopes it will not occur again. His hopes were not realized. He then describes a wedding in some detail.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 6

  • Box 29, Folder 78
Charles writes of his love. Col. Poland left on leave. He mentions that Dr. Loving spoke highly of Ria’s grandfather Starling (Elizabeth Pepper’s father). Charles wants Lizzie to take some photographs of the portraits of Ria’s ancestors for Dr. Loving to see.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 11

  • Box 30, Folder 1
Charles asks questions about baby Susan. He then turns to issue of getting servants. Nora is not coming back. He notes some discontent but does not describe it. He asks Ria if he should speak to Dr. Loving’s cook about getting a girl or attempt to bring colored women from Frankfort. Letter contains information on African American servant issues.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 12

  • Box 30, Folder 2
Charles writes about a flower bed he is planning for violets. He will visit Frankfort soon and is bringing Tom Smith with him. Mentions George (brother) and Mr. Macklin (farm manager).
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 13

  • Box 30, Folder 3
Short letter because he has been officer of the day. He is anxious to have Ria and Susan with him. He is going to build the hot bed himself.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 19

  • Box 30, Folder 4
Charles leaves for field exercises on August 20 but plans to arrive in Lexington Saturday noon. George is to meet him and go to Frankfort with him and Mr. Smith. Praises Susan.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 August 24-25

  • Box 30, Folder 5
Charles is in camp near Visalia, Ky. He visited his mother and everyone expressed excitement about the new born Susan. Brother Jim and Eliza plan to visit Margaret Johnson in order to see her. Charles encourages her to have her mother invite Jim and Eliza to stay there. Says Eliza is very sensitive. He went shooting with Mr. (tom) Smith and George (his brother). Charles hopes May (Ria’s sister) not offended at George’s impudence He has always been a privileged character, and thinks my new sisters are also his. Adds a note on the 25th
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 26

  • Box 30, Folder 6
Charles was visited by his brother Tom, a professional soldier. Comments in blue ink are those of Mrs. Blanford and are accurate.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 2

  • Box 30, Folder 7
Charles had telegraphed Ria because he felt uneasy about her. He is in rifle camp and will not be able to see her before going back to Columbus. He went to Visalia (KY) with Durfee and Smith. Mention the birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. Davis.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 3

  • Box 30, Folder 8
Charles is with his unit at rifle practice but will return to Columbus soon. He mentions Tom Smith and another man whose name is illegible.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 September 7

  • Box 30, Folder 9
Charles writes about desire to be with Ria and Susan. He mentions his guest and the arrival of the 6th Infantry together. Mrs. Atkinson and Mrs Minor may be two of the guest. Mentions Captain and Mrs. Rogers.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 8

  • Box 30, Folder 10
Charles writes a very sensitive note on the first anniversary of their marriage.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 9

  • Box 30, Folder 11
Charles expresses his frustration with his superiors for having a street parade in the hottest part of a hot day. Many men fell out, including Rogers and Grimsley. Rogers became unconscious and Charles’ description of the cure says something about home remedies or medical practice.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 10

  • Box 30, Folder 12
Charles notes he is feeling better after the September 9 parade in the heat. Captain Rogers is better too. He saw Dr. Loving who will help find a cook. He writes about planting violets at their house. Charles has had house guests but says little about them.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 September 13

  • Box 30, Folder 13
He is concerned because her letters have appeared sad. He describes the work he has been doing on their house. He hopes his request for leave has been approved so he can see her soon.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 14

  • Box 30, Folder 14
Charles tells Ria about work on their home and the arrival of some furnishings. He assures her they will have a wonderful home. He asks her to find a gift for the marriage of Anna Worley. Mrs. Harvey W. Worley had been a very good friend and he felt badly about forgetting about the wedding.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 16

  • Box 30, Folder 15
Charles explains why he has not written. He was tied up with duties of officer of the day and with housecleaning. He plans to see Dr. (Starling) Loving who has promised to find them a cook.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay fragment, [1899] January 27

  • Box 30, Folder 16
see date on envelope. A twelve page diary letter of events aboard the General Grant as they head for the Philippines. Describes ship, a converted cattle boat. Mostly talks about how much he misses her and plans for reunion. Letter ends at the anchor in harbor at Gibraltar.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898

  • Box 30, Folder 17
Charles in Lexington. General news about his mother and Eliza Clay, James B. Clay Jr.’s wife.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 March 11

  • Box 30, Folder 18
Charles is in Frankfort and Ria is in Columbus. He sends news of home. He plans to go with Mr. Chinn and Mr. Macklin to Lexington on business but does not say what. It probably concerned Ria’s farm. Macklin was an overseer of the farms for the Pepper women and Chinn was something of a financial adviser. Mentions Lena and Mr. Hatchett.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay (2), 1898 March 12

  • Box 30, Folder 19
Announces arrival in Tampa; describes the weather and his camp. Suggests that any invasion of Cuba will await training of the volunteers that will reinforce the regular army. Again warns Ria not to pay heed to the newspaper accounts.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 23

  • Box 30, Folder 20
Charles writes of his chances for promotion. A new army bill has decreed one major instead of two be added to each regiment. He is angry at that rascal Bailey of Texas and the Democrats who oppose all army bills. He says he’ll never vote Democratic. Charles is trying to get permission from Governor Bradley to raise a regiment. He urges Ria to encourage a friend (Dick Dencer) to write an article for Lexington, Louisville, and Frankfort papers saying he has offered his services to the state. He plans to raise men who served under him at the University of Kentucky.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 23

  • Box 30, Folder 21
Spanish American War—notes health, his brother Tom’s trip to Washington to seek war appointment. Says tell Pinnie that Tom (Smith) is well and making sketches of the camp for her. Tom Smith sent interesting sketches from many of the posts at which he served.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 25

  • Box 30, Folder 22
Charles is happy Ria and Susan have reached Frankfort. Notes receipt of letters from Mrs. Pepper and his mother. Urges Ria to sing Susie her daddy’s song. Fears she will forget him before he returns. Concerned that his insurance policy covers him even when at war. Suggest she seek help of Mr. (Frank) Chinn if necessary.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 26

  • Box 30, Folder 23
Notes letters from home and his pleasure that she is in Frankfort. Urges her not to pay much heed to newspaper accounts of the war.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 27

  • Box 30, Folder 24
Obligatory note containing information on military news. Expresses concern that Captain Rogers may have to retire.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 28

  • Box 30, Folder 25
Notes a flurry of telegrams concerning illness of daughter Susan. He then turns to war news. Capt Poland, a friend, will become a Brig. Gen’l of Volunteers. He is quite hostile to the volunteers. Hopes they won’t be needed. Believes victory at Manila may send a message to Spain. Notes that Dr. Pope has brought his wife to Tampa.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 29

  • Box 30, Folder 26
Spanish American War. Contained two film copies of photographs of Charles D. Clay. Expresses concern about Susan and urges her not to worry about him.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 4

  • Box 30, Folder 27
Spanish American War, meets old friends, misses family. Mentions Mrs. Pope, wife of Dr. Pope and Capt Rogers, Mr. Michie, Dr. Ten Eyck, Capt and Mrs. Guilfoyle, Col. Lane.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 5

  • Box 30, Folder 28
Spanish American War. Romantic letter about his homesickness and desire that war will be over quickly.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 6

  • Box 30, Folder 29
Describes Cuban army in training in Tampa. Plans to go to a dance at the Tampa Bay Hotel given by the ladies of Tampa.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 9

  • Box 30, Folder 30
Spanish American War. Attended Episcopal Church, minister Mr. De Hart. Dined with a Mrs. Allen. Met General Wheeler, formerly of the Confederate army. He knew his cousin Harry Boyle Clay had been on Wheeler’s staff in Civil War. Felt Wheeler’s appointment would do much to unite North and South.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 11

  • Box 30, Folder 31
Affection letter between husband and wife. Separation is undoubtedly taking a toll on them.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 15

  • Box 30, Folder 32
newspaper clipping. Spanish American War. Advises Ria on how to handle the wheat crop. Tom Clay is also advising her but Charles suggests that she listen to Mr. Macklin as well. Macklin was the farm manager of several Pepper farms. The farm in question belongs to Ria. Charles also talks about political appointments during the war. Appalled that the Governor has named Bill Owens a major. Says presidential appointments are just as bad---young Alger and Logan for example. He will do his duty anyway.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 16

  • Box 30, Folder 33
He and Tom Smith had visited the port at Tampa and talked to naval officers. Notes that he left his family one month ago but it seems like two months.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 17

  • Box 30, Folder 34
Announces appointment as Regimental Adjutant. Means he will be mounted. Believes the position enhances his chance of advancement.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 19

  • Box 30, Folder 35
The navy has the Spanish fleet penned up in the harbor of Santiago de Cuba. Believes the war will be over shortly after surrender of the fleet. Gives some news of individuals moving from one unit to another.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 21

  • Box 30, Folder 36
Charles’s duties as Adjutant getting in way of his letter writing. Says he was appointed by Col Haskell. Clay is now Chief of Staff. Says he will explain duties later. Met a General Lee. He also notes that Dr. Loving, one of Ria’s doctors, was apparently working on Clay’s behalf. The Clay family was quick to use any influence they could muster.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 24

  • Box 30, Folder 37
Short note. He is tired but in good health.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 26

  • Box 30, Folder 38
Charles writes to Ria about the formation of a new regiment by the Governor of Kentucky. Charles had asked Ria, his uncle Charley Jacob, and a Dr. Loving to use their influence in support of his appointment as a Colonel of a volunteer regiment. However, this regiment is composed of Negro troops and he wants nothing to do with it. He says only the Negro troops in the regular army had caused any trouble although he does not mention what the trouble was. His letter is rather racist. He thinks he can get along with his Colonel, Haskell, but he does not altogether admire him. As adjutant his expenses will increase. He explains the new costs.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 30

  • Box 30, Folder 39
Spanish American War. General letter; notes they have orders to be prepared to go to the transports at a moment’s notice.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 31

  • Box 30, Folder 40
Page 3 of a letter during Spanish American War. Notes injury to Col. Haskell and deaths of Dickinson and Michie
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 1

  • Box 30, Folder 41
Spanish American War Note to say he is well but knows nothing of troop movement.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 3

  • Box 30, Folder 42
General letter. Mr. Macklin had agreed to select a horse for him but Charles says quartermaster Department has provided one. Talks about his daughter
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 4

  • Box 30, Folder 43
Announces to her that they are about to move. He does not know whether he will go to Puerto Rico or Santiago de Cuba. Letter then speaks of his love. His letter suggests that he is a little anxious. Adds a footnote that she might follow Tom Clay’s suggestion concerning Pat Henry working her farm on shares.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 5

  • Box 30, Folder 44
Spanish American War. Charles is on the transport. Describes officers’ quarters as comfortable. He has taken Tom Smith into his quarters. The men, however, are most uncomfortable. Blames the government for inadequate preparation. Mentions transport ships Cherokee and Iroquois and the 17th Infantry.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 6

  • Box 30, Folder 45
Spanish American War—troop ships had moved to the entrance of the bay then been ordered back to Port Tampa. Most of letter is about finances. He does not cash her $100 check and assures her that he will be able to send her money.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 8

  • Box 30, Folder 46
Letter expressing love for wife and daughter. Encourages wife to keep his mother informed because he has time to write only one letter. Urges her to pay no attention to newspapers and other rumors. Mentions two people Ria may have known.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 10

  • Box 30, Folder 47
Spanish American War. Another letter telling her the convoy is moving.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 11

  • Box 30, Folder 48
Spanish American War. Describes harshness of battle and loss of 17th infantry officers Haskell, Dickinson, and Michie. Mentions General Nelson Miles. Says the expedition was not prepared properly and the President and his advisors have much to answer for.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 14

  • Box 30, Folder 49
Charles writes that the Spanish have asked to surrender. A cease fire exists while instructions are requested from Washington.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1898 July 6

  • Box 30, Folder 50
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 10

  • Box 30, Folder 51
Spanish America War War news—17th is on west side of Santiago as part of an encirclement of the city. He is well. Urges her to share his letters with his mother.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1898 July 11

  • Box 30, Folder 52
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 13

  • Box 30, Folder 53
Spanish American War. Notes how busy he is but hopes to be started home in 10 days.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1898 July 16

  • Box 30, Folder 54
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 6

  • Box 30, Folder 55
Spanish American War Note saying he had arrived at Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point Long Island.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 25

  • Box 30, Folder 56
Charles preparing house at Columbus Barracks with servant Effie. He wants Ria to visit. Elizabeth Clay Blanford’s note on envelope denotes conception of Charley Jr. and importance to father.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1898 August 26

  • Box 30, Folder 57
Homesick for Ria. Asks her to leave Susan in Frankfort and take train to Cincinnati where he will meet her. Tom Smith wants her to bring Pinnie too.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 September 23

  • Box 30, Folder 58
Charles is blue because wife and daughter are in Frankfort. Daughter Susan is ill.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 September 24

  • Box 30, Folder 59
Charles preparing their home in Columbus. Hopes to be with her in a week.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 September 25

  • Box 30, Folder 60
Note saying he hopes to start for Frankfort in two days.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 September 30

  • Box 30, Folder 61
Charles is preparing to leave for the Philippines. Mrs. Pepper has been with him helping pack. Charles found some letters from a Miss Bronson, a former girlfriend with whom he talked about marriage. He had broken it off when he went into military service. He burned them and told Ria they meant nothing to him. There are, however, other letters from her in the collection.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 October 3

  • Box 30, Folder 62
Charles announcing his travel to Frankfort from Columbus
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 13

  • Box 30, Folder 63
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay telegram, 1899 January 15

  • Box 30, Folder 64
Charles informs Ria he is leaving Columbus, Ohio for New York and eventually the Philippines.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 16

  • Box 30, Folder 65
Phillipine Insurrection. Sentimental letter about what she means to him. Mentions sense of duty as a military officer. Elizabeth Pepper had helped him close up the house in Columbus. He describes a parade through Columbus with many friends, businessmen and even the governor saying nice things to him.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 3

  • Box 30, Folder 66
He writes a short note because they will soon leave Gibraltar but he promises to write more shortly. He mentions the weather, her cablegram, and his robust health.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 10

  • Box 30, Folder 67
Philippine Insurrection. Charles aboard U.S. Transport Grant near Port Said. Long letter describing Gibraltar, British-Spanish relations. Met the American consul, a Mr. Sprague who had known James B. Clay when minister to Portugal. Describes a dinner given the American officers by the British. Voyage from Gibraltar along coast of Africa. Expresses homesickness for her and Susan.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 25

  • Box 30, Folder 68
Philippine Insurrection. Charles describes the voyage that took him virtually around the world. The Grant sailed through Gilbraltar and the Red Sea. Noted the boredom with nothing to see but water. Expresses his feelings for her and daughter Susan.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1899 March 4

  • Box 30, Folder 69
Philippine Insurrection. Charles writes from the U..S. Grant on his way to the Philippines. He describes the city of Colombo to her. Encourages Ria to be brave.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 13

  • Box 30, Folder 70
fragment. She describes a pretty day and a walk with Susan, their daughter.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 17

  • Box 30, Folder 71
Philippine Insurrection. Clay notes arrival in Manila; expected protracted fighting. Mentions photographs for Ria and Susan.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 19

  • Box 30, Folder 72
Charles writes to say he has been appointed Adjutant General of the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division of the 8th Army Corps. He lists units in the brigade. General Robert H. Hall appointed him. He was honored and felt it a stepping stone. Suggested that Tom Clay could explain to her.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 24

  • Box 30, Folder 73
Philippine Insurrection. Charles writes almost with a premonition of his fate. He expects a decisive battle the next day and becomes quite religious. Mentions doing his duty several times in the letter. Asks ria to look after his mother.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 April 2

  • Box 30, Folder 74
Charles sends a typed letter explaining how he was wounded. He admits to having mislead her in his initial cablegram, but now gives her details of the battle, his wound, and the prognosis for the future. Mentions General Hall and Lieutenant Gregg.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 April 9

  • Box 31, Folder 1
Philippine Insurrection. Fifteen days after his wound Charles writes to assure Ria he had done his duty faithfully. Recounts the death of Lieut. Gregg. Calls Gregg the finest specimen of physical manhood. Charles criticizes the war saying right is not on our side. Says surgeon will take him to the British war ship Powerful to x-ray his shoulder. After X ray a Dr. Fitzgerald will decide whether to extract the bullet or send him to U.S. Charles claims he is doing well. Expresses thanks to the women of the Red Cross, particularly Missess Henshall, Ridley, and Dowling
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 10

  • Box 31, Folder 2
Charles is in Nashville working at the recruiting station with a Lieut. Carter of the 5th Cavalry. He must travel two nights and one day to man the Memphis station as well. Discusses plans to assure safety of family when they move there. He wants to hire a Vanderbilt student to spend the nights in a room of their home. Excited about the extra money he will make because of travel. Seems to be trying to impress Ria with how much he will make.
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Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 12

  • Box 31, Folder 3
Charles is in Nashville. He is looking for a house to rent so mentions estimated costs; also estimates costs for servants. Charles gives Ria specific instructions about ordering stationery.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 14

  • Box 31, Folder 4
Charles is delighted with his pay which includes travel money. He is anxious for Ria to join him. Wants her to bring Pinnie with her. Also bring Mary Jackson. They can hire a girl to help her if necessary.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 18

  • Box 31, Folder 5
Charles is worried because the family members are all sick; urges Ria to keep nothing from him (interesting since he kept many things from her) Attempting to find a house in Nashville so discusses rental property and possible improvements.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 19

  • Box 31, Folder 6
Charles describes his schedule to her and gives her an address in Memphis. He will be there on Wednesday’s. He will rent a house soon. Talks about getting dresses made and ideas for the house. Mentions death of Henry Ware Lawton, his commanding officer in the Phillipines and Thomas J. Clay’s commanding officer in the Geronimo campaign.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 26

  • Box 31, Folder 7
Short note to tell her he had arrived in Nashville. Enjoyed Christmas with the family; hopes she will soon join him in Nashville
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 27

  • Box 31, Folder 8
Ria had asked him to write from Memphis. Mentions a Moses Gibson.
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Charles D. Clay to Mariah Clay, 1900 January 10

  • Box 31, Folder 9
The furniture has arrived in Nashville for their house. He has the grippe.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1900 January 14

  • Box 31, Folder 10
He had been ill but took Warburgs tincture prescribed by Dr. Maddin and now feels better. He has sent a telegraph so she won’t worry. He urges her to ship their household property. He misses his family. He describes damage to the furniture that had been shipped. He expresses surprise at the share she has received from the sale of farm products. She received $95 but he says her share of the estate should be around $20000 so she should be receiving a great deal more.
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Charles D. Clay to Ria Clay, 1900 January 15

  • Box 31, Folder 11
Charles describes the house he has readied for Ria. He also tries to heal a rift with Ria’s mother. He had said her portion of the estate should yield more income. Says he knows she has done the best she can and he is grateful to her. He is hurt that Mr. Chinn and Mr. Macklin should be so critical of his judgment that they cannot make the balance of the estate yield two percent.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1900 January 23

  • Box 31, Folder 12
Charles writes about acquiring servants. A friend, Mrs. Brown, has helped him get a house girl whom he describes as a 30 year old mulatto woman. Mrs. Brown will also help him find a cook. He encloses a letter from his mother and suggests that if she is strong enough they must have her with them during the winter.
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Charles D. Clay to Mariah Clay, 1900 January 28

  • Box 31, Folder 13
Charles is obviously anxious about her impending arrival in Nashville. He has prepared the home, insulated the windows, contracted for a closed carriage. Supper will be waiting. Servants will please her.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1900 June 16

  • Box 31, Folder 14
Charles expresses his loneliness and how much he looks forward to her arrival. He suggests that the house he has prepared is more attractive than the one in Columbus. Encourages her to ask her mother to come with her. One the freight comes he will be ready to meet her in Louisville for the journey to Nashville. He insists that she get a vaccination for herself and Susan.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1901 November 16

  • Box 31, Folder 15
Arrived safely in St. Louis. Purchased Christmas gifts for Susan and Charley. Notes his blue spirits over separation.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1901 November 23

  • Box 31, Folder 16
Charles mustering out short term enlistees. This is after his wound so not fit for field service. He reported to a Col Goodale; hopes to join others of 17th Infantry who will be stationed at Columbus Barracks.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1901 November 30

  • Box 31, Folder 17
Information about Charles’s military pay and expenses. Had Thanksgiving dinner with Capt and Mrs. Morse; seeing their daughter made him miss his family more. Letter suggests that he would like to go into business with Tom Smith. Note in blue ink is in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 2

  • Box 31, Folder 18
General letter. He has little to do but they expect a transport in with soldiers to be discharged.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1901 December 6

  • Box 31, Folder 19
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 10

  • Box 31, Folder 20
Glad to receive letters from Ria, Susan and Charley. Liked Susan’s drawings. Transport Sheridan arrived so plenty to do.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 13

  • Box 31, Folder 21
Writes to tell Ria that he is thinking about retiring. Wound is painful. He thinks himself unfit for active service. He has consulted physicians and they will recommend that he go before a board if he wishes it. Notes in a post script that a position he had thought available for Tom Smith fell through.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 1

  • Box 31, Folder 22
(stationery says 1901 but is probably 1902 given contents of letter. Clay went before a Board of Medical Officers who would report to a Retiring Board on his condition. Mentions presents from Tom and Pinnie Smith and Lizzie smith.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 4

  • Box 31, Folder 23
Failure of Christmas presents to arrive; speaks of his impending retirement. He has been before a board of Medical officers and expects them to recommend retirement. Clay was wounded in the Philippine Insurrection in 1899.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 7

  • Box 31, Folder 24
Charles’s birthday so he is making resolutions about being good husband and father. Sends Ria half his pay. Mentions Board of Medical Affairs.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 10

  • Box 31, Folder 25
Romantic letter emphasizing his dependence upon her. He hopes his decision to retire is a proper one and that he can provide ample support for his family.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 13

  • Box 31, Folder 26
Charles says he has just about finished processing the men from two transports and the Grant will soon arrive with the 4th Infantry and 500 discharged men. Urges Ria to have rugs aired; fears moths. Mentions retirement. Has been playing whist, cribbage and solo. A major Garrard of 9th cavalry is good at whisk.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 15

  • Box 31, Folder 27
Charles answers a letter from Ria chastising him for not writing. He says letters have miscarried. He mentions that the Grant will soon arrive. He does not go to San Francisco because it is expensive. Mentions Captain Perry.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 17

  • Box 31, Folder 28
He reminisces about his mother, Susan M. Clay, celebrating her 79th birthday and writes briefly about his work.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 22

  • Box 31, Folder 29
Charles expresses his pleasure that Ria and the children are at Mrs. Pepper’s house instead of the Capitol Hotel for the winter. He mentions the landing of the Grant with men of the 4th Infantry. He mentions possibility of the 17th Infantry being sent to Alaska. A Capt Jenks told him it was pleasant there but he prefers service in this country.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 25

  • Box 31, Folder 30
Charles in San Francisco but contemplating retirement. Asked Ria to send him a list of blue china she wants. He is allowed 2000 lbs of baggage so can ship it at government expense.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 26

  • Box 31, Folder 31
Mentions a trip to San Francisco to see a comic opera called The Princess Chic with Mrs. Cole and Capt and Mrs. Perry. Weather was very bad----cold and damp. Spent night with the Perry’s at Fort McDowell. Mentions processing the men returning on the Grant.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 2

  • Box 31, Folder 32
Charles explains how boring life is on the island. He plays cards with the other two old men, Majors Garrard and Augur. [Probably Joseph Lee Garrard, 9th Infantry, and Ammon Arthur Augur, 20th Infantry. See http://www.mfhn.com/auger;geds;afsa;augg118.htm#3723 and http://www.arlington cemetery.net/joseph-girrard.htm. He then writes romantically about how bad he misses her.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 6

  • Box 31, Folder 33
Charles writes that he received the list of Canton China Ria would like. Will check at Sing Fat’s store. Writes tenderly of wife and family.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 7

  • Box 31, Folder 34
Charles answers a letter from Ria about the assassination of Governor William Goebel. Jim Howard, one of the suspects is from the same county as Major Garrard who says that Howard is a cowardly murderer. Even if he did not kill Goebel his past suggests a capability to do most anything. Promptly changes subject to his impending appearance before the Retiring Board.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 8

  • Box 31, Folder 35
He writes of the boredom of camp. He is reading a novel, Janice Meredith, and does not go to San Francisco because it is expensive.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 9

  • Box 31, Folder 36
Describes trip to San Francisco. Reading novel Janice Meredith. [Bu Paul Leicester Ford and Edward Everett Ross, it is about a girl who helps Paul Revere.] Went to Sing Fat’s store but closed due to Chinese New Year [a popular Chinese bazaar].
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 11

  • Box 31, Folder 37
Camp life very quiet. Played a few games of Solo with Maj Garrard and Augur. He writes briefly of the retirement board, held up by absence of General Young.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 12

  • Box 31, Folder 38
He writes about the blue china Mrs Pepper and Ria want. He complains about the price. Most of letter contains affectionate comments of a husband to his wife.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 13

  • Box 31, Folder 39
Charles teases Ria because he did not receive a letter. Boredom of camp life; cards with Majors Garrard and Augur the only amusement.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 14

  • Box 31, Folder 40
Charles is frustrated by the tax issue. Example of difficulties military personnel have with frequent transfers and financial obligations. He is also upset that she had to deal with it, perhaps a sign of his traditional values.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 24

  • Box 31, Folder 41
Agrees to look for blue China and assures her he will follow her advice about spending more money than he can afford. He tells her his retirement file should reach Washington soon but he probably won’t hear anything before March 10.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 27

  • Box 31, Folder 42
Clay writes to assure her that he had not been inconvenienced by the storm. She referred to a cyclone in Feb 26, 1902 letter. He had also telegraphed and thanked her for her concern. He tells her he had picked wildflowers for Susie and papa’s boy. Tom had written him about taxes, he believes, are the same that Ria had paid.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 28

  • Box 31, Folder 43
Charles notes that he has seen Capt Lyon and Capt Dowdy who have just returned from the Philippines. Tells Ria that Dr. Pope died in the Philippines of Bright’s disease. Bright family experiencing much tragedy. One of their sons has disappeared. Charles is highly critical of the war in the Philippines. It is too costly in money and human lives.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 March 2

  • Box 31, Folder 44
Short note mentioning press of work. He is working toward retirement and is hoping Tom Smith might get his position.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 March 5

  • Box 31, Folder 45
Describes a visit to San Francisco (he is stationed at Angel Island) where he met many old friends—(Henri) Lyon, an unnamed Sgt Major of the 17th, Major Wilson, Captain Dowdy (describes difficulties of), Captain and Mrs. Cole. Describes continuing pains from the surgery associated with his wound.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1902 September 21

  • Box 31, Folder 46
Short note keeping in touch. He mentions a trip to the dentist and the miserable weather.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1904 November 10

  • Box 31, Folder 47
Charles assigned to Clemson College. Talks to President of the College about repairs to their house—a Dr. Mill (spelling uncertain) most of letter is about what furniture to bring and storage for other pieces. Also mentions having dinner with Prof. and Mrs. Riggs, a professor of mechanical engineering.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 July 18

  • Box 31, Folder 48
Concerned because Dr. Bullock has diagnosed Charley with typhoid fever. Praises Ria for taking him to Good Samaritan Hospital. Letter shows father’s concern.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 August 5

  • Box 31, Folder 49
Conferring with Colonel Johnson and Mr. Dowdy about finding a house. Does not want to bring the children down until cooler weather. He misses his family. Mentions a Minnie Williams who was nice to Charley while he was ill and a lease with Tom Shelby.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 August 16

  • Box 31, Folder 50
Describes a house and arrangements to rent it from a Mrs. Bright. Describes housing conditions in Little Rock.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 August 19

  • Box 31, Folder 51
Discusses financial matters, Ria’s state of mind, and the house he has rented for them. He will go to Kentucky for them around September 20. He is in Little Rock.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 August 29

  • Box 31, Folder 52
Charles explains his travels as a civilian employee of the army. He has to go to Fort Smith, (Ark), Texarkana, and Hot Springs. He had been at Clemson but is delighted to be away from it. He alludes to significant issues at Clemson. Mrs. Blanford writes at the end of the letter that as military commander at Clemson Clay found the boys undisciplined. When he attempted to control them the authorities refused to support him. She says the entire junior class was dismissed by the next commander.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 September 14

  • Box 31, Folder 53
Charles worried about Charley. He is getting the house ready for the family to join him in Little Rock.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1907 September 18

  • Box 31, Folder 54
Plans to meet in Louisville for the trip bringing the family to Little Rock. Still concerned about Charley who had a relapse.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 May 15

  • Box 31, Folder 55
Ria’s surgery has been scheduled by Dr. McMastry for May 25. Clay will apply for leave so he can be with her. (He wasn’t) Tries to cheer her by quoting a Dr. Gibson who says her operation is not a dangerous one. Also calls her the bravest woman he ever saw.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 May 18

  • Box 31, Folder 56
Charles is depressed over money and absence of family.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 8

  • Box 31, Folder 57
Short note about weather and press of business.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 9

  • Box 31, Folder 58
Enclosed list of Bible and Science Readings for Ria. He had fixed up the cottage; misses her; asks about how she feels as she recuperates from surgery. Enclosure is a list of Bible and Science and Health readings from Lena, Ria’s sister to Ria. Other correspondence suggests Charles was rather hostile to Christian Science so it seems out of character for this to be in Charles’s letter.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 12

  • Box 31, Folder 59
Talks about her surgery and his travels.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 13

  • Box 31, Folder 60
Complains of train schedules; mentions her surgery; mentions a burning accident of Dan Payne. Fears that turmoil over horse racing in New York will hurt the price of a filly he wants to sell on June 26. To Ria’s complaint that she does not receive letters, he notes that he writes a few lines every day.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 13

  • Box 31, Folder 61
Misses Ria terribly; having trouble with station at Texarkana. Will send Arondale (spell) to replace the Corporal there.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 14

  • Box 31, Folder 62
He has been to a party at the Elk’s Club in Little Rock with a Mr. Dowdy. Noted that there was no drinking. Urged Ria to remain in the hospital if she was too weak to go home. Bit is Bob as note in hand of Mrs. Blanford says.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 16

  • Box 31, Folder 63
Complains of health; thankful for Mr. Dowdy who relieves some of his lonesomeness. Dowdy and two others will come to play cards in evening. He notes there will be no gambling. Worried because he does not know if she has left the Louisville hospital for Frankfort.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 17

  • Box 31, Folder 64
Talks money matters with Ria; has paid the infirmary and sent W.S. Farmer his note for items she has purchased. His brother George has written him fearing ruin because New York has passed an anti-racing bill. Notes his own horse interests. Terribly distraught over finances, but mentions that he could make $4600 per year plus income from two farms. Talks about taking a recruiting position in Louisville. Letter paper clipped to one from Mary Nash ______ to Ria, June 10, 1908
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 18

  • Box 31, Folder 65
General letter but tells her what she should not do following surgery.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 20

  • Box 31, Folder 66
Lonesome letter to Ria. Urges her to care for herself and follow the instructions of Dr. McMastry, her surgeon. He emphasizes how much he misses her. Describes Shreveport and the problem of mosquitoes.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 22

  • Box 31, Folder 67
Charles in Little Rock, Ark recruiting for army; talks about cashiering a corporal; most of letter about Ria’s surgery. Mentions M.D.s he has checked with—a Dr. Amis at Fort Smith and a Dr. Gibson. Ria’s md. Was a Dr. McMastry. Bill of the surgery (probably a hysterectomy) was $300. Also talks about a possible assignment in Louisville. Ria does not like Louisville.
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Charles D. Clay to Mariah Clay, 1908 July 3

  • Box 31, Folder 68
Ria has written a depressed letter related to her surgery and other issues. Clay has written Dr. McMastry, her surgeon, about her symptoms. He also consoles her about Mary, Susan’s caretaker, who had a stroke. Describes sense of obligation to help her because of what she had meant to family (an aspect of race relations). Wants to move to Louisville. Only a Mr. Dowdy cares about him in Little Rock. Does not understand Elizabeth Pepper’s prejudice against Louisville. Discussion of where they will live. He has suggested that they live with his sister, Teetee, and share expenses. Would make same offer to Ria’s mother.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 10

  • Box 31, Folder 69
Charles writes about her surgery. Apologizes for a scolding letter. Signs letter Old Daddy, a reference to the difference in ages of Ria and himself.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 11

  • Box 31, Folder 70
Charles is concerned about finances. Ria has moved back to Kentucky, the expense of which may be an underlying theme of the letter. He also notes his loneliness and need for family.
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Charles Donald Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 13

  • Box 31, Folder 71
From Little Rock he writes a general letter. Mentions Clifton Breckinridge (had been in Civil War with Charles’s brother James) and how nice he had been to him.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 14

  • Box 31, Folder 72
Chides Ria for walking alone in the woods without a man protector. Remainder of letter is chatty news about neighbors and a house he could rent if she approved of it.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1908 July 19

  • Box 31, Folder 73
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 23

  • Box 31, Folder 74
Misses her terribly; writes, Ria I am such a baby. Wants to be with family.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 25

  • Box 31, Folder 75
General letter about travels and his illness due to the heat. Saw (Clifton) Breckinridge.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 July 27

  • Box 31, Folder 76
Short note saying he is feeling better. He is stationed in Little Rock; she is at her mother’s in Frankfort.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 August 1

  • Box 31, Folder 77
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 August 30

  • Box 31, Folder 78
Gives her travel itinerary and plans to start home.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1915 August 31

  • Box 31, Folder 79
Charles in Washington with brother Tom trying to get back on active duty with the army. A friend, Bob Woolley, has been seeking help of Mr. Breckinridge, member of Kentucky’s congressional delegation probably. The reference to Dr. Trapp and the baby’s eyes is puzzling. The youngest child, Elizabeth would have been 8 years old.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1918 June 7

  • Box 31, Folder 80
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1918 September 29

  • Box 31, Folder 81
Ria has written that she does not want to stay in Louisville or anywhere else without him but he tells her that he is going to do just that. Also sends note telling children to be good for their mother. All is not well in the Clay household. Mentions importance of Tom Smith’s position, but also notes the extravaganza of Pinnie, Ria’s sister. Cautions that she must be frugal. Stresses the fact that he is old. There is obvious significant tension in family.
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Charles D. Clay, Jr., 1907-1918

  • Box 31

Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, Jr., 1907 October 19

  • Box 31, Folder 82
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Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, Jr., 1918 June 30

  • Box 31, Folder 83
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Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1879-1897

  • Box 29, 31-32

Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, undated

  • Box 31, Folder 84
Enclosure to letter to George H. Clay not found. Asks Teetee to use some money he had sent George to buy their mother a birthday present. Enclosed it separately so if Susan asked to see his letter they would not have to show her this note.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1879 June 15

  • Box 31, Folder 85
He spends a page telling them why he has not written. He describes his employer, W.C. Houston Jr, very favorably. He says it is difficult to succeed in the wool business without start-up capital. Mentions a trip by Cousin Mary, Mrs. Conley and Eliza to Atlantic City
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1880 May 6

  • Box 31, Folder 86
Charles tells her of his employment by W.C. Houston, Jr & Co. purchasing wool. He asks Teetee to forward him some money so he can meet his expenses. Wants money from his mother as well. Has a grand plan to make a fortune. Urges Teetee to keep his plans secret but does not explain why.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1880 June 1

  • Box 31, Folder 87
Teetee had written him despondent because she could not raise the money to go into the sheep business with him. He is discouraged too and is considering breaking his ties with Mr. Houston. Charles is thinking about selling his land. He has written to (Basil) Duke about it. He notes that he does not like the way Duke is handling their business. He says it is gratifying to hear how high Harry stands in Louisiana. (Harry would go on an Arctic expedition and return to Louisville politics between this time and his death in 1884.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1880 June 26

  • Box 31, Folder 88
Charles is in Trinidad, Colorado. He asks Teetee for $150. He can’t find a job but does not want to go home. Eugene Cushing will arrive in a week and Charles thinks Cushing can help him obtain a job.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1883 February 26

  • Box 31, Folder 89
Teetee and mother are visiting Fort Leavenworth. He hopes they will come home soon. He is not well. In explaining why he writes so infrequently he mentions an accident last summer. He now has dyspeptic headaches. He writes about preferring death than struggle to survive. He visited Eliza and Jim. He mentions George and his horses, the uncertainty of horses, and George’s desire for a farm. He had dinner with the Mentelles, a Lexington family. (Mary Mentelle, daughter of Waldemar and Charlotte Mentelle, married Thomas Hart Clay) He also visited the McDowell relatives and describes some of the alterations they are making to Ashland. He saw the Harrisons. He mentions Margaret who is disconsolate because of rumors Tom is engaged.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1886 August 15

  • Box 32, Folder 1
Charles complains of the intense heat at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He asked about his mother’s health and suggests a trip to the mountains of Western Virginia. He urges her to put no trust in newspaper accounts. He asks what Kentuckians think of a particular case, then says he does not think Mexico wants war.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1887 September 15

  • Box 32, Folder 2
Charles writes from Fort D.A. Russell in Wyoming. Some discussion of garrison social life.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1888 January 9

  • Box 32, Folder 3
He describes a full social life at Fort D.A. Russell. He mentions a reception given by Dr. Caldwell for a newly married couple (name indecipherable) and a German he and a Lieut. In his regiment gave for a Mr. Kuykendall of Cheyenne who had been very polite on their hunting trip. He planned a Christmas tree and party for 27 children of the enlisted men. He had Christmas dinner with the family of Capt. Van Home. He goes on to describe diners, Germans, and other social events. He also notes that sitting on court martial has kept him busy. He mentions a photograph of his father (James B. Clay) that Teetee sent him. He is proud of his father. He received a gift from Aunt Etta (Jacob relative) He mentions Lucy (perhaps Lucy Scott), Ida Clay, Nettie McDowell, Margaret Martin, and Eliza Clay, and Mary Stallcap. There are numbers on the back of last page, perhaps scores of a card came.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1888 March 2

  • Box 32, Folder 4
Charles sends $15 for payment on loan. The letter includes information on obligations to Teetee and to George.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1888 August 26

  • Box 32, Folder 5
They stopped in Omaha because of General Mezner’s illness. He calls Omaha a stupid little western town. He has made a long March which will end at Keaney, Nebraska.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1890 January 13

  • Box 32, Folder 6
Charles thanks Teetee for his Christmas present. Notes that Jeannie Worley has returned home.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1894 November 2

  • Box 32, Folder 7
Charles explains that he has been busy preparing his company for a long march and that is why he has not written. Sends a check for $80 to Tom.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1895 April 1

  • Box 32, Folder 8
Charles described a bad cold and bronchitis he had developed as a result of a trip to Phoenix. He went with Col DeRussy and Mr. and Mrs. Collins. He spends most of the letter talking about people that knew Tom Clay. Mr. Collins admired him very much. He met a man named Baker who wanted to be remembered to Tom. He also mentions a Dr. Ainsworth of Lo Angeles, Colonel Ward, Adj General of the Department, who knew Tom.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896 August 12

  • Box 32, Folder 9
Charles writes to Teetee about his wedding. He wants to be involved in all the planning. He is concerned that certain people be invited, ordering a new uniform, etc.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1897 June 4

  • Box 29, Folder 49
Charles writes after learning from brother Tom that Teetee had fainted and cut her head badly in the fall. His advice seems quite Victorian.
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Charles D. Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1897 November 13

  • Box 32, Folder 10
Charles notes a fire at Balgowan in which some mirrors were lost. He suggests the importance of having insurance. He urges Ria to visit them in Columbus. Mentions a letter written by Harry with a postscript from John, two of his brothers.
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Susan M. Clay, 1868-1901

  • Box 32

Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1868 July 15

  • Box 32, Folder 11
Charles writes to say he and George are well and to ask about his mother and Teetee. He mentions Frank Noad.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1871 March 1

  • Box 32, Folder 12
Charles and George are at school and want family members to write. They do not like the food. He mentions that Teetee will go home with a Mrs. Nelson and that Nestor had written him. On back of letter in large letters is Home-Sick Boys Geordie and Charley
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Susan M. Clay, 1872 May 12

  • Box 32, Folder 13
Writing from Racine College in Wisconsin. He mentions a cricket match but he was excused by Mr. Spalding due to a hand injury. He and Walker (unknown) have joined Dr. De Kouen’s confirmation class. He asks her how Mansfield looks. Mrs. Clay lived at the Thomas H. Clay estate for several short periods after the Civil War. He asked about his Aunt Mary (Mrs. Thomas H). Wants George, Tom and Teetee to write to him.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1880 August 8

  • Box 32, Folder 15
Charles describes his journey by horseback 300 miles from Trinidad to Rico.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1882 August 16

  • Box 32, Folder 16
The family has purchased the land outside Lexington (site of present Calumet Farm) which they s (James Clay Jr) and wife Eliza are in New York. Envelope explanation is by Elizabeth Blanford.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1882 October 23

  • Box 32, Folder 17
He is pricing tickets for her from Louisville to Denver. He tells her not to be uneasy about him becoming engaged. Paupers have no business marrying. He mentions two people—Katie and Uncle Robert. Both are probably from the Jacob family since no one of those names is Clay's
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Telegram Charles D. Clay to Mrs. James B. Clay, 1883 October 6

  • Box 32, Folder 18
Charles tells his mother he has passed his examination,
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1884 March 16

  • Box 32, Folder 19
Charles notes that he has written regularly and should be congratulated for overcoming the monster procrastination. He is concerned about brother Tom’s ill health. This letter must have been written just before Susan M. Clay bought the farm they named Balgowan. The letter speaks to the wild life of a western military post. Guard house is full of prisoners after a post pay day spree. Only one of his men is in the guard house and he will not prefer charges. Praises his company commander and says they both believe in justice tempered with mercy. He tells his mother not to worry about lions, bears, etc. because he is cautious. Refers to a dangerous activity called “coasting.” Dr. Brach broke his leg. Promises to go to church. Charles is stationed at Fort Custer in the Montana Territory
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1884 June 3

  • Box 32, Folder 20
Charles sends $120 to pay George, Teetee, and part of his debt to Mrs. Clay. Explains why he has not sent more. He is trying to get a transfer but is not terribly hopeful.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Susan M. Clay, 1884 June 11

  • Box 32, Folder 21
From Fort Custer, M.T. Charles sends 8 photographs he was given as follows: one to her, one to Teetee, one to Eliza (Mrs. James B. Clay Jr.), one to aunt Mary and Miss Rose together (Mary Mentelle Clay and daughter Rose), one to Margaret Martin, one to Jennie Walker, one to Harry (Brother), and one to Aunt Etta (a Jacob relative). The Harry Clay he mentions is either his uncle or his cousin in Rogersville, Tennessee. He then asks for photographs of all his relatives. He writes about his success as a military officer and claims his health is good.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1884 December 8

  • Box 32, Folder 22
Charles encourages his mother to seek medical attention before she is seriously ill. He mentions that Mary Harrison is seeking the position of Post Mistress and he encourages her to write to Mr. Cleveland, the President, on her behalf. The Harrisons have always been true friends. Teetee has told him that Cousin Nannie (Anne Clay McDowell) has been very attentive. He also mentions Nettie McDowell and wants her to find him a sweetheart and send him her picture since he sent her one of himself earlier. He wants her to thank Mr. Wilson, probably Robert Burns Wilson, for a picture he gave Mrs. Clay of Uncle Aaron (Dupuy). Uncle Aaron was an early valet of Henry Clay and a family favorite. Charles tells her of plans to seek a leave of absence to gather letters of recommendation and to see Mr. Cleveland about a transfer to the 2nd or some other Regiment of Cavalry. Says his only claim upon Arthur was his grandfather but on Cleveland has both grandfather and father. And he says he is a Democrat. Offers his brother Jim a good citizen overcoat that is now too small for him and asks his mother to give his love to Jamie Walker and tell her to write.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1885 March 1

  • Box 32, Folder 23
From Fort Custer, Montana Territory Charles sends a check to pay part of his debt to George. He also promises to send Teetee money. He tells his mother his health is good.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1885 July 16

  • Box 32, Folder 24
Charles writes from Fort Custer to tell his mother he had arrived safely from a training trip. He describes the terrain and the danger of rattle snakes. He has enjoyed the trip but is excited about orders to go to Fort Leavenworth. He also urges his mother not to be so concerned about Tom. There may be Indian uprisings but he mentions several reasons Tom will be safe.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1886 January 6

  • Box 32, Folder 25
Charles has begun his career in the military. Dissatisfaction with African-American servants.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1886 August 6

  • Box 32, Folder 26
fragment. He has just returned to Fort Leavenworth. He mentions the heat and the abbreviated work schedule caused by it. He mentions an accident to one of the officers and in the midst of an explanation the remainder of the letter is missing.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1886 August 8

  • Box 32, Folder 27
Charles tells of two tragedies at his base. A Lt. Weinberg had been seriously burned and might not recover, and a child of General McCook had died. He mentions that he had seen that Lady Longfellow had won a race in Chicago. That would be a horse owned either by George or Tom. An inset to the letter tells about the fire that burned Weinberg. He had gotten up during the night. He stumbled and fell on his lamp. His underclothing became soaked in the oil and caught fire.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1887 January 3

  • Box 32, Folder 28
Charles writes brief note to let his mother he arrived at Fort Leavenworth safely. He mentions meeting many pretty girls in Louisville and forgetting to leave his Uncle Tom (Thomas P. Jacob) eight dollars.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1887 January 7

  • Box 32, Folder 29
It is Charles’s birthday so he writes to thank his mother for his existence and all the advantages he has had. He laments accomplishing so little. He is entering his examination period (for the military) so won’t be able to write. He sent an $8 money order to Uncle Tom (P. Jacob) that he had forgotten to give him when in Louisville.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay (2), 1887 June 6

  • Box 32, Folder 30
His letter is brief because he is preparing for examinations at Fort Leavenworth school. He has almost finished his essay on the campaign of Vittoria. He says Teetee can read it in Napier’s Peninsular War. He asks about George’s horse Chevalier.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1887 November 24

  • Box 32, Folder 31
On Thanksgiving, he notes that the family has had no great afflictions, no great reverses, good health and a fair degree of prosperity. Dined with Colonel and Mrs. Offley. He is no great force, but pleasant socially She is an excellent type of the southern lady. Mentions three Marshall girls living with them, the granddaughters of Lewis Marshall, a brother of Judge Thomas A. Marshall of Kentucky. They are related to Robert E. Lee. He attended a party given by a Dr. Garrand. He asks if George received the $75 he sent him.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. Susan M. Clay, 1888 December 17

  • Box 32, Folder 32
He has contacted Dr. Patterson of Kentucky University about a position at the university. He hopes to receive a three year assignment there. He also talks to his mother about his desire to find a wife, a subject they have discussed before. He also talks about his debts.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. and Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1888 December 24

  • Box 32, Folder 33
Charles writes of his love of family and reveals a concern that he is getting older and remains unmarried. He wonders if he can ever fall in love with any woman. He has thirteen volumes of Tolstoy he plans to send but has read several of them. He thinks Tolstoy one of the great writers of the century but does not like the way he handles Napoleon. He attributes Tolstoy’s dislike of Napoleon to the fact that the author is Russian. He describes his own feelings toward hero worship. He thinks historians are guilty of it and should pay more attention to what is great and good in the national character. He mentions an imported horse that George h ad lost. Praises George for handling the loss well. He is seeking a position at the A&M College (Kentucky University) He discusses his finances and his intent to pay the note he owes George. The note on blue paper is to Lindsey Apple from Elizabeth Clay Blanford dated March 20, 1988. She notes that Charles Clay later gave the Tolstoy volumes to Susan, his daughter, her sister.
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Charles D. Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1889 January 26

  • Box 32, Folder 34
Charles writes a postcard to calm his mother’s fears. He assures her he will be home around March 1.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1889 January 26

  • Box 32, Folder 35
Charles writes from Fort D.A Russell in Wyoming. He has received a scolding letter from her and thought it is not the first there are things that pain him. Susan has apparently accused him of not loving them because he does not write frequently enough. He defends his membership in the Cheyenne Club. He meets the best people of the town there and thinks it preferable to loafing around saloons and public billiard halls. He claims he has gambled only once. He occasionally plays cards with other officers. He has probably lost fifty or sixty dollars over the last year and a half. He also lost eighty dollars in a game played with citizens. She has also chastised him for a failure to appreciate the value of money. He agrees. He assures her he will do nothing to disgrace her or himself. He mentions having lunch with Susie Magoffin. Claims he is one of the best dancers in Cheyenne.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1889 October 31

  • Box 32, Folder 36
Charles writes to let his mother know he has arrived safely from his hunting trip. They brought back over 3000 pounds of meat. He is delighted with his role.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1890 June 15

  • Box 32, Folder 37
Charles writes about a disagreement with Dr. Patterson of the University. The War Dept has published an order defining what officers detailed to colleges are required to do. Apparently Patterson wants him to do differently. Charles assures his mother he will handle the matter without antagonizing Dr. Patterson but he will stand up for his rights. He plans to see Governor (Simon Bolivar) Buckner who is an old army officer. He notes he was glad to see that one of the Clay horses, Balgowan, had won a stakes race in St. Louis.
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. James B. Clay Sr., 1896 March 25

  • Box 32, Folder 38
Charles is disturbed by the selling of property in his mother’s trust. He also tells her that he may be able to transfer to the 17th Infantry at Columbus, Ohio
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Charles D. Clay to Mrs. James B. Clay, 1896 August 3

  • Box 32, Folder 39
Charles is upset that he hears so little from home. He announces plans to leave Whipple Barracks on August 25. He says wedding will be simple because Ria is in mourning (death of her brother Robert). He promises to show his mother Ria’s letters when he gets home. It will convince her of Ria’s strength and pure, Christian spirit.
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Lt. and Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Mrs James B. Clay Sr., 1896 December 13

  • Box 32, Folder 40
Charles and Ria write separate letters to Mrs. Clay. Charles’s letter encourages them to visit. Ria has well-placed relatives in town and there is an officer who was in Tom’s unit. Ria describes the house in great detail and encourages the Clays to visit.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1897 November 18

  • Box 32, Folder 41
Charles expresses concern for his mother’s health. He asks about a trip to Columbus to see them.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1899 November 13

  • Box 32, Folder 42
fragment. From Fort D.A. Russell Charles writes chastising his mother for not taking care of herself. He wishes he was there to help nurse her then apply some army discipline to her habits. He then notes that he is in charge of his company and has whipped them into shape. Charles seems to be quite the disciplinarian. He describes a hunting trip that he led.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1901 June 8

  • Box 32, Folder 43
News of family. He has sent Ria and children to Frankfort. Hopes his mother can see them.
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Charles D. Clay to [Susan M. Clay ] fragment, undated

  • Box 32, Folder 44
Charles is serving in the west and is writing home but only pages 2 and 3 of the letter are here. He mentions gifts for two of the servants. He also mentions the Goodloe-Swope affair which helps date the letter.
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Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1912-1935

  • Box 32

Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1912 January 12

  • Box 32, Folder 45
Clay apologizes for not writing but claims press of business. Trying to secure position with Governor McCreary of Kentucky. Working with General Haldeman, the Adjutant General and Col. Tandy Ellis his assistant. Mentions Bud (Charley) and Bit (Bob). Fritz Goedecke is May’s husband.
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Colonel Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 January 14

  • Box 32, Folder 46
Postcard.
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Colonel Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 June 20

  • Box 32, Folder 47
Thank you for father’s day gift.
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Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1935 January 30

  • Box 32, Folder 48
Thanks her for remembering his birthday. Apologizes for not writing sooner but he has suffered a very bad cold.
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Colonel Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1935 September 19

  • Box 32, Folder 49
Demanding to know their financial circumstances so he and Uncle Tom (Thomas J. Clay) can help them.
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William Sawitzky, 1930-1932

  • Box 32

Colonel Charles D. Clay to William Sawitzky, 1930 June 9

  • Box 32, Folder 50
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Col. Charles D. Clay to William Sawitzky, 1931 September 11

  • Box 32, Folder 51
An example of the Colonel’s Victorian discretion.
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Charles D. Clay to William Sawitzky, 1932 May 22

  • Box 32, Folder 52
Sawitzky is feeling the impact of the depression in New York. Clay offers a place for the summer.
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To Charles D. Clay, 1867-1930

  • Box 32, 45, 63

Cousin Ida to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 32, Folder 53
A brief letter written by a young child. Ida invites Charles to come stay with her family.
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J.T. Jacob to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 32, Folder 54
Charles cousin writes that he must cancel their plan to visit a young woman.
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Social Invitations to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 32, Folder 55
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Invitation to Wedding of Sunshine Harris and Thurston Ballard to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 32, Folder 56
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Mary T. Nash to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 32, Folder 90
copy. The Nashes were related to Ria Pepper Clay. She mentions moving away and letter is from Clarksville. She mentions two sisters Virginia Lee and Jessie Finley. Letter is probably from 1870s because she use the derivative of George, Geordie, used when he was a young boy.
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Mary [Mrs. Thomas H.] Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1867 March 27

  • Box 32, Folder 91
copy. Mary is delighted to hear from her nephew, praises his letter then begins a rather somber account of things. Farming is bad, no money is being made, they do not have the means to entertain, country life is lonely, and she fears Charles’ mother is lonely too. Mike (unidentified) has a nice little Irish wife and Nestor (unidentified) goes to school when the weather permits. Thomas Hart Clay has not returned from Central America.
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Unknown to Charles D. Clay, 1878 August 12

  • Box 32, Folder 57
He informs Charles he can’t help him in Boston because he has no strong acquaintances there.
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A.E. Richards to Charles D. Clay, 1878 December 27

  • Box 32, Folder 58
Letter contains business information.
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Daniel Hefferman to Charles D. Clay, 1878 November 13

  • Box 32, Folder 59
Hefferman offers to sell the lots he bought for taxes back to Clay.
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Thomas P. Jacob to Charles D Clay, 1879 January 27

  • Box 32, Folder 85
Jacobs expresses admiration for Charles’ perseverance over two years trying to find a position and hopes he will now be successful. He tells Charles of Susan M. Clay’s illness but hopes that when the effects of morphine have worn off she will recover. She is staying at Mattie Richards.
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A.E. Richards to Charles D. Clay, 1879 January 25

  • Box 32, Folder 60
Encloses a check for $200 for a sale. Gives Charles advice and encouragement.
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S. Barton Shelby to Cousin (Charles D. Clay), 1879 October 26

  • Box 32, Folder 61
Family news
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Unknown to Charles D. Clay, 1879 December 27

  • Box 32, Folder 62
Postcard. Writer asks Charles for $50 to buy clothes. The card is probably from George Clay. He talks about his St. Louis property.
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H.B. Peasly to Charles Clay, 1880 May 31

  • Box 32, Folder 73
Job opportunities in the wool business.
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Thomas P. Jacob to Charles D. Clay, 1880 July 14, September 21

  • Box 63, Folder 19
Note Elizabeth Clay Blanford. Elizabeth was daughter of Charles D. Clay. Letters claim Jacob cannot help his nephew with employment. There was some friction between the Louisville Jacobs and Susan M. (Jacob) Clay over inheritance and management of funds.
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Unknown to Charles D. Clay, 1880 December 12

  • Box 32, Folder 63
The letter relates the death of Dr. E (Eugene) Cushing in an affray with Ed Ponett (?) Cushing struck by two of five shots. Cushing settled his affairs and died with honor.
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Unknown to Charles D. Clay, 1882 July 23

  • Box 32, Folder 64
Signature is indecipherable. James F. Robinson Jr, the manager of Crab Orchard Springs may be the son of James F. Robinson, the Union Governor of Kentucky during the Civil War. He writes to make note of some kind of accident that has befallen Charles Clay in Louisville. He hopes he finds someone who will help Charles as much as Charles helped him at an earlier time but no explanations are given. He notes that he wants to go into Eastern Kentucky, apparently on business Charles knows about but he has been unable to do so. Invites Charles to visit him for a few days.
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Letter of Recommendation for Charles D. Clay from W.C. Houston Jr., 1882 October 31

  • Box 32, Folder 65
Letter to potential employers in the wool buying industry. Note in blue ink is by Elizabeth Clay Blanford. It suggests Charles Clay strongly disliked the wool business.
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Charles D. Jacob to Charles D. Clay, 1882 December 20

  • Box 32, Folder 66
Jacob, the mayor of Louisville and Charles’s uncle, sends Charles $60 and mentions that he had received a scolding letter from Susan M. Clay. Evidence of the hard feelings regarding administration of the family trust.
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John J. Jacob to Charles D. Clay, 1892 April 27

  • Box 32, Folder 67
Jacob was Clay’s uncle, but was of similar age. McDowel Wedding----Nettie or Nanette McDowell and Thomas Bullock. A major social affair in Lexington.
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A. Baied to Charles D. Clay, 1893 February 13

  • Box 32, Folder 68
The writer addresses the letter to his cousin and the letter deals primarily with genealogical issues. Mentions the father of John, the Grenadier.
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Unknown to Mr. Charles D. Clay poem, 1895 November 15

  • Box 32, Folder 75
Only a printed poem in envelope. Probably from Ria. They married Sept 8, 1896
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Pinnie Pepper to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 10

  • Box 45, Folder 1
Letter praising Clay’s daughter Susan. Says she has a temper and the letter suggests it was encouraged by family members.
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Charles D. Jacob to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 19

  • Box 32, Folder 69
He sends a cup and a fan as gifts commemorating his son who was killed in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Charles Clay made the arrangements to have the body exhumed and sent back to Louisville. Someone has written the names of people over terms like niece, mother, etc. They appear to be accurate. Charles D. Clay’s actions led to better relations between Charles Jacob and his sister, Susan M. Clay. She had believed he had mismanaged her trust fund.
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P.B. Haskell to Charles D. Clay, 1898 December 7

  • Box 32, Folder 70
Spanish American War. Thank you note for Clay’s comments in Ohio State Journal about the fallen of the 17th which included Haskell’s brother.
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J.W. Atwood to Charles D. Clay, 1900 January 29

  • Box 32, Folder 71
Writes to ask for contribution and solicitation of same for a memorial to the men of the 17th Infantry at Trinity Church in Columbus, Ohio. Includes two enclosures, one of the church treasurer’s report and the other a portion of the announcement of the memorial.
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Will F. Aldnach to Charles D. Clay, 1900 January 30

  • Box 32, Folder 72
Philippine insurrection. Aldnach was in charge of the litter carrying wounded men the day Charles was wounded. Letter gives a very graphic account of that day. Says he believed Clay very near death. Medical value of whiskey!
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Ella Williams to Charles D. Clay, circa 1908-1914

  • Box 32, Folder 74
Early 1900s. Miss Williams ran a school Charley and Bob attended briefly. Susan graduated in 1914.
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G.D. Wilson, Secretary, Kentucky Association to Charles D. Clay, 1911 October 27

  • Box 32, Folder 76
Notes enclosure of statement for entry in the Breeders’ Futurity 1913. No statement included with letter.
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George M. Kaltschmidt to Charles D. Clay, 1912 December 10

  • Box 32, Folder 77
Writes asking Clay for a job. He has heard that Clay has a detail with the organized Militia of Kentucky.
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George M. Kaltschmidt to Charles D. Clay, 1913 March 12

  • Box 32, Folder 78
Contains newspaper clipping and cloth book mark Letter requesting help getting a position in Louisville. Lists retired officers of the 17th Infantry living in the East San Diego, CA area. Includes copy of a speech Clay gave in 1898 when the 17th returned from Cuba honoring the fallen. Letter says it was from Columbus Dispatch. Also a small cloth book marker noting the return of the 17th
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Desha Breckinridge to Charles D. Clay, 1913 April 3

  • Box 32, Folder 79
Desha takes Charles up on offer to write the President and Senator (Ollie) James to recommend him for position of Collector of the District.(Internal Revenue)
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Secretary to the President to Charles D. Clay, 1913 April 7

  • Box 32, Folder 80
Acknowledges Clay’s letter of recommendation for Desha Breckinridge as Collector of Internal Revenue for the 7th District of Kentucky.
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Louisa Allan to Major Charles D. Clay, 1918 September 2

  • Box 32, Folder 81
Letter praising Bob Clay.
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D.S. Spencer to H.B. Clay (actually Charles D.), 1922 February 11

  • Box 32, Folder 82
Sends news to Clay about circumstances of Charley’s death. Spencer had visited Clay earlier on a trip south to tell him all was not right about the investigation at FT. Snelling. Testimony of Capt Orsinger and Lieut Ingram; Urges Clay to come to St. Paul himself.
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D.J. Spencer to Col. Charles D. Clay, 1923 February 25

  • Box 32, Folder 87
Spencer reports to Clay that he has been to the Department of Justice to speak to the officer in charge of the investigation. He describes information that came secretly from the army base to the investigating officer. He encourages Clay to come to Minnesota. Notes in margins are in hand of Elizabeth Blanford. They give a few of the death as the family chose to see it.
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R.C. Davis to Col. Charles D. Clay Telegram, 1923 February 28

  • Box 32, Folder 88
Has ordered commanding officer at Fort Snelling to render every practicable assistance. Refers Clay to his letter of Feb 27.
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Adelbert Cronkhite to Charles D. Clay, 1923 March 31

  • Box 32, Folder 89
Sends a pamphlet confidentially to indicate that he experienced circumstances similar to the death of Charley Clay.
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Official Notification War Department to Col. Charles D. Clay, 1923 June 15

  • Box 32, Folder 83
The board determined that Charley’s death had occurred in line of duty and not the result of his own wilful (sic) misconduct. No powder burns or singeing of the hair characteristic of Colt 45 wound. Noted that pistol was on the mantle but impossible for him to have placed it there. He was not killed by his own pistol which is missing. Further praise of Charley.
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M.J. Johannis to Colonel Charles D. Clay, 1924 August 8

  • Box 32, Folder 86
Johannis notes a check Charley had made out to J.M. Heller and promises to investigate. Assures Clay he will leave no stone unturned in the investigation.
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J.P.Young to Colonel Charles D. Clay, 1930 December 3

  • Box 32, Folder 84
Hart family genealogy
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1877-1879

  • Box 33

Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 33, Folder 1
Duke says he cannot complete their business because the tax title man is sick. Hopes to complete it by January 3.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1877 October 15

  • Box 33, Folder 2
Duke acknowledges receipt of check to be applied to taxes.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1877 November 15

  • Box 33, Folder 3
Advice and information on sale of lots.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 April 25

  • Box 33, Folder 4
Duke informs Clay on market for lots.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 June 3

  • Box 33, Folder 5
Duke explains why he can not sell Charles’ land.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 September 6

  • Box 33, Folder 6
Information on property holdings in Louisville
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 September 8

  • Box 33, Folder 7
Duke urges Clay not to go to court because his adversary gave an extension of time as a personal favor. He urges him to keep his lots even if he has to borrow money to pay the taxes. He tries to explain tax laws to Clay. Susan M. Clay was mistaken in her interpretation, he says.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 September 12

  • Box 33, Folder 8
Information on taxes owed.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 September 17

  • Box 33, Folder 9
Duke gives legal advice about taxes on lots.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1878 December 16

  • Box 33, Folder 10
Advice on the low market for lots.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1879 April 17

  • Box 33, Folder 11
Duke says he is doing all he can to find purchasers but it is not possible to accomplish impossibilities.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1879 June 21

  • Box 33, Folder 12
He agrees to sell property when purchasers can be found.
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Basil Duke to Charles D. Clay, 1879 August 24

  • Box 33, Folder 13
Duke gives legal advice on lots on which are owed back taxes, potential sale of lots etc.
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1878-1879

  • Box 33

Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1878 September 24

  • Box 33, Folder 14
Agrees to help Charles.
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1878 October 11

  • Box 33, Folder 15
Jones informs him that a Mr. Green will place Charles in a position buying wool.
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1878 November 21

  • Box 33, Folder 16
Jones urges Clay to see Alfred Pope if he has been unable to raise funds. It is important for Clay to be in Philadelphia soon.
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1878 December 21

  • Box 33, Folder 17
Jones discusses Charles’ attempt to find a position. If current effort fails he wants a mutual friend to introduce him to William Houston. (Charles later went to work for Houston in the wool business.)
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1879 January 13

  • Box 33, Folder 18
Gives Charles advice about making a fortune. He mentions that Charles has problems with his eyes.
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1879 March 24

  • Box 33, Folder 19
Jones writes of a voyage they took hunting and fishing. He speaks of a great deal of leisure activity then encourages Charles as the latter enters the wool trade. He hopes Charles will finish his apprenticeship before the trade begins. The letter mentions a number of family members. Jones is married to Susan M. Clay’s sister Kate. Penciled note is by Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1879 August 29

  • Box 33, Folder 20
Jones gives Charles some business advice and some encouragement. He also mentions Tom Clay’s success as a marksman. (Tom later won a number of army competitions as a marksman.)
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Samuel H. Jones to Charles D. Clay, 1879 November 25

  • Box 33, Folder 21
Jones responds to a letter from Charles. He mentions the wool business and general news of business and the family.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1875-1880

  • Box 60

Lucy Scott note, undated

  • Box 60, Folder 20
In hand of Lucy Scott and filed with her letters. It probably was contained in a letter.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay fragment, undated

  • Box 60, Folder 24
Thinks it strange that Charles and his four brothers are all single. Mentions her cousin Jane who is Edward Biddle’s mother.
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Lucy Scott acceptance of invitation from Charles D. Clay, 1878-1880

  • Box 60, Folder 21
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1875 July 22

  • Box 60, Folder 25
Tells him not to come to see her because she is busy with blackberry preserves.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1878 August 25

  • Box 60, Folder 26
Acceptance of engagement. Subjects: Social history.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1878 September 18

  • Box 60, Folder 27
Subjects: Social history.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1878 October 30

  • Box 60, Folder 28
Subjects: Social history.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1878 December 22

  • Box 60, Folder 29
Subjects: Social history; West Point Party. Wife of General Scholfield; Flirtation.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 January 5

  • Box 60, Folder 30
At West Point. Attends a cadet party. Lucretia Hart (Teetee) Clay, Charles’ sister is there too.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 March 5

  • Box 60, Folder 31
Subjects: Social history Mentioned: Mr. Alford of Lexington; Sallie and Lucy Humphrey
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 April 7

  • Box 60, Folder 32
Mentions invitation from Teetee to visit, but had to decline. Talks about an old beau.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 May 12

  • Box 60, Folder 33
Subjects: Social history; Belle Alliance; southern blacks.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, approximately 1879 May 28

  • Box 60, Folder 34
Lucy’s stationery. Dated 1879 because addressed to Charles who was in Philadelphia in 1879. Pressed flower in the envelope.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 May 29

  • Box 60, Folder 35
Subjects: social history pressed fern in letter.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 June 12

  • Box 60, Folder 36
She feels fate keeps them apart. Encourages him to try to get to know the Yankees of Philadelphia that he detests so much.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 June 23

  • Box 60, Folder 37
Subjects: Social history She is pushing him for a commitment. Tiny picture included in the letter. A young woman’s boredom.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 July 1

  • Box 60, Folder 38
Lucy speaks of them as engaged. She wants him to go to Trinidad and start a sheep farm. He can be independent and she is not as enamored of society as he might think. Apparently she is assuming marriage.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 July 22

  • Box 60, Folder 39
Subjects: social history.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 August 11

  • Box 60, Folder 40
Subjects: Social history.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 August 24

  • Box 60, Folder 41
Chatty letter, mild flirtation, local news. Mentions Thomas J. Cay’s success as a marksman.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1879 September 7

  • Box 60, Folder 42
Scott chastises Charles for not writing as frequently as she thinks he should. Letter may say something about social relationships. Her tone is quite flippant. It suggests wealth at a time when he is struggling to find a position.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1880 January 2

  • Box 60, Folder 43
Mentions a visit to New Orleans by Mary Ballard. Asked her cousin Sallie Bennett to call on Teetee.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1880 March 17

  • Box 60, Folder 44
Misunderstanding between them. She has heard he and Barton Shelby are a match.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1880 April 27

  • Box 60, Folder 45
Sympathizes with Clay over financial woes. Mentions an overpowering dread of insanity. Says she will not connect herself with a family in which it was hereditary. Ironic since it existed in Clay family.
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Lucy Scott to Charles D. Clay, 1880 May 16

  • Box 60, Folder 46
Wants to know about New Mexico. Mentions his illustrious heritage and the importance she places on it. She does not think Teetee, Charles’ sister, likes her but declares Susan M. Clay, Charles’ mother, a highly refined lady. Mentions coming marriage of Lizzie Scott and Duncan Ogden. Mentions Lucy Bergland.
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Mariah Pepper Clay (Mrs. Charles D. Clay), 1883-1939

  • Box 63
  • Item 1
  • Box 33-38, 45
The Mariah Pepper Clay series comprises correspondence, a sworn statement, an art notebook, ephemera, and a memory book, which documents Mariah Pepper Clay's familial relationships and major life events. Letters written to her husband and children make up the bulk of the collection and concern events such as her wedding; the birth of her children; her husband's military service; her childrens' schooling at institutions such as West Point and the University of Kentucky; Charles D. Clay, Jr.'s suspected suicide; her conversion to Christian Science; and Susan Clay's elopement with William Sawitzky. The letters illuminate her relationships with her children, husband, mother-in-law Susan M. Clay , and sister-in-law Lucretia Teetee Clay. Additionally, the series includes a sworn statement concerning the death of Charles D. Clay, Jr. (Box 33, Folder 24).

General and single letters, 1883-1928

  • Box 63
  • Item 1
  • Box 33

Mrs. Charles D. Clay to unknown fragment, undated

  • Box 33, Folder 22
Letter about property they could buy collectively with some hope of a profit.
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Invitation to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 63, Folder 5
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Art notebook Mariah H. Pepper, 1883 September 13

  • Box 33, Folder 25
Pencil drawings and paintings by Mariah H. Pepper (Clay)
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Mariah Hensley Pepper Memory Book, circa 1890-1895

  • Item 1
Ria kept dance cards, invitations, minor league baseball scorecards and many other items related to her social life in Frankfort before her wedding in 1896. There are dried flowers, hair pins and other small artifacts as well. There are a few letters and pictures attached to the pages. The book provides a picture of the social activities of gentry youth.
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Maria Hensley Pepper (Clay) to Susan M. Clay, 1896 January 12

  • Box 63, Folder 1
Ria writes to her future mother-in-law attempting to say all the right things.
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Mariah Pepper Clay to Susan M. Clay, circa 1899-1900

  • Box 33, Folder 23
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Copy Sworn Statement of Mrs. Charles D. Clay on death of Charles D. Clay Jr., 1928 March 5

  • Box 33, Folder 24
Seeking to be declared his beneficiary. Statement explains circumstances of Charles D. Clay Jr.’s death.
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Mariah H. Clay (Mrs. Charles) to William Sawitzky, 1928 April 24

  • Box 63, Folder 2
Susan doing art work; off to Louisville with Col Strode Jackson. Invites Sawitzky for a visit; Susan had dinner with Mr. and Mrs. (Frank) McVey.
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Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1931-1939

  • Box 33

Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1931 November 3

  • Box 33, Folder 26
Postcard. Denotes sensitivity expressed within family.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1931 November 10

  • Box 33, Folder 27
Elizabeth is visiting Bob at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Mrs. Clay writes about Susan leaving to go back to New England, taking with her a number of birds.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1931 November 13

  • Box 33, Folder 28
Pin refers to Mrs. Tom (Pinnie) Smith, Mrs. Clay’s sister. Mrs. Clinkenbeard was a Christian Science practitioner used by Susan, Elizabeth and Mrs. Clay. Mrs. Clay and the girls attended the Christian Science group. The brothers and Colonel Charles D. Clay remained Episcopalian.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1931 December 3

  • Box 33, Folder 29
Elizabeth is visiting her brother Bob, a West Point graduate, stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Mary Martha was Bob Clay’s wife, nee Martindale.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay Blanford, 1932 January 20

  • Box 33, Folder 30
Susan, Charles, Robert and Elizabeth called their mother Marm. Elizabeth was called Metzie. Many of their letters are signed or addressed to those nicknames. They all loved animals and kept many pets. Elizabeth married William Blanford after World War II. Susan married William Sawitzky in 1927.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Starling Clay, 1932 January 14

  • Box 33, Folder 31
newspaper clipping enclosed. Notes her appreciation of Elizabeth’s frank assessment of circumstances around Capt A (Allison). (There was great hope within the family that Elizabeth would marry him, but she said that while she liked him and his mother she could not marry a man she did not love.) She mentions some of Elizabeth’s literary efforts, particularly Frogtown Spirit and possibility that Professor Farquar of the University would get them published. Mentions precarious financial situation. She discusses problems of tobacco farming in early years of the depression. She then turns to social activities and notes that Tom Clay had been hit by a car in Lexington but was being treated very well by the staff at the hotel where he lived.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Starling Clay Blanford, 1935 August 15

  • Box 33, Folder 32
Addresses letter to Charley, son who had been dead for over ten years; Elizabeth (Metzie) visiting Bob in Champaign, Ill.; Escapade; Tom (Smith), a cousin; Mrs Martindale, Bob’s mother-in-law; Cleo (Dawson Smith) taught Spanish at U.K.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1935 September 15

  • Box 33, Folder 33
Elizabeth visiting her Aunt Pinnie Smith. Mentions Millie Lawson. Mentions Helen and Tom. Tom Smith is Pinnie’s husband.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1938 August 27

  • Box 33, Folder 34
Elizabeth spent part of her inheritance after the death of her father on a trip to Europe. Mrs. Clay was visiting Susan, but rented rooms then spent most of the day with her daughter and William Sawitzky.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Elizabeth Clay, 1939 April 11

  • Box 33, Folder 35
Elizabeth visiting Susan ; Lizzie is Mrs. Clay’s sister; mentions Lucy Ferman, author of Ky mountain stories.
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Charles D. Clay, 1895-1923

  • Box 33-36, 63

Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay Fragment, undated

  • Box 33, Folder 36
Susan cutting teeth. Letter expresses concerns about the fire place and the danger to children.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 33, Folder 37
Dated around Thanksgiving after birth of Bud in 1899 Mary is servant who helps with children. Mentions birth of Robert Burns Wilson’s daughter; Tom and Lizzie smith, Mariah’s sister. Ria often referred to Charles as her old man because of the difference in their ages.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1895 September 28

  • Box 33, Folder 38
Ria writes flirtatiously that she will see him Sunday evening but makes no promises as to the sanity of her behavior.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1895 October 31

  • Box 33, Folder 39
Ria has sent him a quotation then has to explain it to him. She has expressed a willingness to leave everything and depend absolutely on him for happiness. Then tells him not to ask her to say more.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1895 December 11

  • Box 33, Folder 40
Ria chastises Charles for not writing as he has promised. She mentions that Governor and Mrs. Bradley are staying with Mr. Tarlton. Elizabeth Clay Blanford writes that Tarlton is Christine Reynolds’ step-father. Warns Charles to keep out of the way of the Apaches.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1895 December 18

  • Box 33, Folder 41
Ria recounts that only two weeks ago he was visiting her. She says Christine (Reynolds) could not gauge the Governor’s (Bradley) response to her petition for Charles. (Charles had appealed to the governor of a position.) She did mention that he had many applications. Ria then tells Charles that she has begun bicycling to their country home each day. She is gaining a reputation as a nineteenth century new woman. Letter is one by a young woman seeking to be engaging but avoiding saying too much.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1895 December 26

  • Box 33, Folder 42
Ria writes a chatty letter about Christmas. She thanked Charles for the roses he sent her. She told Mr. Cannon about her engagement to Charles.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1895 December 31

  • Box 33, Folder 43
Ria is addressing him as Mr. Clay at this time. She says she dislikes cabinet photographs but since it is for him she will go to Mullen (a prominent Lexington photographer) She, Lena and Lissie had planned a trip to the North Carolina mountains but Clay Hatchett, Lena’s husband was too ill so it was postponed. She then talks about a sense of restraint she should feel around him—a reference to proper behavior. She also mentioned a visit from Maime Scott, Marian Lindsay and Thomas Averill—names that appear frequently as friends of the family. Letter includes some talk of Frankfort society. Ria asks Charles what he thinks of the marriage of Sidney Clay to May Stoner of Paris. Belle Clay was expected at Christine Reynolds’ and letter implies she will learn more.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 6

  • Box 33, Folder 44
Ria expresses appreciation for his letters. She then gives him permission to mention their engagement to friends. She describes several pets then mentions bicycling.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 8

  • Box 33, Folder 45
Letter contains gentle banter about letter writing, the habits of men vs. women, etc. She needles him a bit about his age and the need to wear a hat in cold weather. Shows her sense of humor.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 12

  • Box 33, Folder 46
Ria tells Charles she has answered his mother’s letter. She also denotes her awakening to all that has happened and wants Charles to pray with her that all works out properly; She mentions a visit from George C. Webb. There seems to be some irony intended in her response. Says she had heard that he was to be married to a Miss Graves but expresses some doubt. She has joined the King’s daughters, a Frankfort group, and is on the visiting committee for January. She asks if he is a member of the King’s Sons. She also asks him what he thought of her bicycle picture.
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Maria Pepper to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 16

  • Box 33, Folder 47
Ria dresses Charles down for things he has said in previous letters. Apparently he wants her to be more open with her feelings for him. She says it is not in her nature. She would like to express her feelings but when the time comes the valve closes and she cannot say them. She then turns to animals and her love for them. She had ridden out to the Cliffs and found a friend that had been injured.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 20

  • Box 33, Folder 48
Ria writes a flirtatious letter, characteristic of those early in their relationship. She mentions visits by Mr. Wilson (probably Robert Burns Wilson), Marion Scott, and Christine (Reynolds). She urges him to learn to ride a bicycle and speaks of the sense of freedom when doing so. She also mentions a photograph of the officers’ quarters Charles was to send her. They are preparing for the move to the Cliffs for the summer. (The Cliffs was a house they rented in the Thorn Hill area outside Frankfort.) Mentions a McDonald family. Her grandmother is going to give her a set of Montaigne’s writings. Encourages him to write.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 23

  • Box 33, Folder 49
Ria writes about going to Mullen’s Lexington photography studio to have her picture taken. Mullen did photos of many prominent Central Kentuckians. She writes that photographs never capture the true essence of a person because they show no expressions.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 27

  • Box 33, Folder 50
Ria has been out for a cold ride. Her brother Rob’s dog is stretched out before the fireplace. He had upset the household earlier by running off. Chides Charles good-naturedly for suggesting getting a cat to take care of mice. Tells Charles of a Lt. Hart who undoubtedly will be the toast of the social circuit because of his attractiveness, etc. She has heard he has already been engaged.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 January 30

  • Box 33, Folder 51
Ria writes a chatty letter. She has spent the morning with Christine (Reynolds), Belle Clay and Mr. (Robert Burns) Wilson. She has also had a visit from Laura Nutchell, A Virginia girl who has spent much of the winter with Mrs. Simon B. Buckner.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 February 2

  • Box 33, Folder 52
Ria gently chastises him for his goosy ideas about what she means in her letters. Her tone is quite independent. She mentions that he will be coming home in May and asks him if he will welcome the month that will bring him home that is if we keep on good terms till then. She then tells him that she has been visiting her country friends. She visited the Rodman house then went to see Christine (Reynolds) and Belle (Clay) She expresses concern about Belle’s health.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 February 4

  • Box 33, Folder 53
Ria writes that Rob (Robert P. Pepper) is suffering severely with malaria fever following grippe. Dr. Shillman is treating him.
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Maria Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 February 8

  • Box 33, Folder 54
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 February 11

  • Box 33, Folder 55
8 newspaper enclosures. Ria writes about Rob’s death. The family will go to Fortress Monroe in March to try to restore their health. She mentions Teetee’s sympathy note, flowers from Mrs. Clay, and a telegram from Tom Clay. The newspaper clippings are accounts of his death and funeral.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 March 1

  • Box 33, Folder 56
Charles has mentioned going on an expedition in the west and Ria lets him know in no uncertain terms that she is not in favor of it. She turns to family news. Clay Hatchitt and Lena came through on their way to Crab Orchard Springs. Hatchitt is sick and doctors have told him to go to the spring. Willie Starling has also visited. Charles apparently wants a job with the cadet corps at Georgetown College. Lena praises the college. At end of letter Ria teases Charles. Plays on concept of liking vs. loving.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 March 5

  • Box 33, Folder 57
Ria writes to Charles at Whipple Barracks, Arizona. She is somewhat flirtatious then turns to a lecture by Uncle Willie at Cornell University and a trip south.
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Maria Pepper to Charles D. Clay, 1896 March 26

  • Box 33, Folder 58
Elizabeth Clay Blanford wrote in the margin that Dick was one of May’s beaux. He is mentioned in several letters. Ria had relatives in Columbus. Mrs. Pepper’s mother had lived there. She mentions some of her relatives that still live there.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 May 25

  • Box 33, Folder 59
Ria notes the great distance between them and jokes about his commanding officer’s choice of men versus hers. Having attended church she mentioned Mr. Blayney (possibly the minister at the Presbyterian Church) who was trying to balance a trip to Europe with Charles’s schedule (He may have performed the wedding ceremony). Mentioned his two sons, Lindsey and Mack. He had baptized Rob Pepper and been a long time friend of the family. Mentions Mary Harrison and Mr. Johnson.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 June 10

  • Box 33, Folder 60
Maria tells him she is sending him a surprise. The letter refers to events of their early courtship.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 June 12

  • Box 33, Folder 61
The letter contains family news and she mentions the marriage of Louise Goodloe and Mr. ( ) Faulkner.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 June 18

  • Box 33, Folder 62
She asks Charles how she should send a miniature to him. A cousin, Alex Hensley, had visited Charles’s mother and sister and found them charming
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 July 2

  • Box 33, Folder 63
Ria expresses her excitement at living in the west given Charles’s description of it. She is also working at learning to cook and make preserves. She has sent a miniature of herself to him painted by Paul Sawyier, a young artist who gives the promise of becoming a very great success as a miniature painter. He had painted three miniatures for Mamie Scott.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 July 9

  • Box 33, Folder 64
Charles has written to Ria about the native Americans. Letter shows stereotypical views held about the Indians. Ria is planning at this time to join Charles in the West. She notes her cowardice and challenges him to make her an Annie Oakley. She then switches to the topic of the wedding, saying that she wants him to be a part of the planning. She challenges him regarding the frequency with which each writes the other.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 July 24

  • Box 33, Folder 65
Apologizes for writing hurriedly but credits visit by Christine (Reynolds) and Belle (Clay). She agrees to the wedding as soon after Sept 1 as possible. They will decide the date when he arrives. The rest of the letter is a romantic expression of his presence in her thoughts and her hope that she will meet his expectations as a wife.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 July 28

  • Box 33, Folder 66
Light banter about housekeeping duties. Some information on African American servants.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 August 2

  • Box 33, Folder 67
Ria has spoken with Dr. Blayney (the minister) and she will take Charles to see him when he returns to Kentucky. There is perhaps more here than is evident because Ria assures Charles that Dr. Blayney is a most liberal minded sensible man who will do what is right. She rights about acceptance of her by Charles’ family and her sense of reserve. Charles apparently has made comments about tasteful dress.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 August 4

  • Box 33, Folder 68
Ria describes her wedding dress in detail and expresses hope that he arrives home on time. A mutual friend (Mr. Johnson) has told her what a wonderful family the Clays are, particularly Teetee.
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Mrs. Charles Clay to Charles Clay (2), 1896 November 10

  • Box 33, Folder 69 - 70
Ria writes of Charles’s efforts to prepare the house in Columbus—wall paper, etc. She then describes her efforts to get a cook to accompany her to Columbus. The woman worked for a Mrs. Thomas (Emily’s mother) and Ria asked her before talking seriously to the woman. This speaks to relations between African American servants and white upper class.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 16

  • Box 34, Folder 1
Ria is convalescing after accident over Mike the monkey and she will not be able to meet Charles in Cincinnati as planned, She writes that she wants to join him. Notes that Aunt Laura and Miss Pattie (Burnley) were visiting.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 23

  • Box 34, Folder 2
Ria is convalescing from accident. She is feeling better but is still not allowed to walk on the ankle. Pin is her nurse.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 25

  • Box 34, Folder 3
Ria is beginning to venture out after her accident. She notes that Charles has met cousin Starling Loving. She does not know whether she will like him because he has a poor opinion of Kentucky and Kentuckians.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1896 November 27

  • Box 34, Folder 4 - 5
Ria writes of her daily activities. She was limited by an injury received, according to Elizabeth Blanford’s note when she attempted to rescue the pet monkey, Mike, from some dogs. She was on crutches. The letter contains considerable information about servants. Ria was trying to get Martha to go to Columbus with her as a servant, but Martha and her husband were hired by a Mr. pence to become hotel servants in California. She also mentioned Anne as a servant. Dr. Hume was Ria’s family physician.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1896 November 30

  • Box 34, Folder 6
Ria is sitting up after her accident and is able to enjoy the guests. She tells him of the activities of the Pepper house and her plans for her trip to Columbus to join him.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), circa 1897

  • Box 34, Folder 7 - 8
The letter was written before the birth of the baby. She refers to it as Harry. Ria describes her day to Charles. Mentions a letter she received from mrs. Lyon and her insistence that Charles visit. She mentioned a visitor, Mrs. Piper, who had married at seventeen and had ten children. Ria urged Charles to return a call to Mrs. Carter and Mrs. Gill. She speaks of good breeding. She writes about Frank Cannon and his living arrangements. She also tells Charles that poor old Mrs. Preston knitted a receiving blanket for Harry.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), circa 1897-1898

  • Box 34, Folder 9 - 10
Letter speaks of Susan as a baby. Mama is Mrs. Clay’s mother so she is living in Frankfort while Charles is away. Mary was Susan’s nurse when she was little. Jim and Eliza are James B. Clay Jr. and wife. Operated Iroquois Farm near Balgowan. Mentions George Clay, Tom Smith, and her sister May.
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Ria Clay to Charles Clay, 1897 May

  • Box 34, Folder 11
Mentions illness of Louise; a visit by Helen Page. Hints at a relationship between Page and Robert B__. She and May were driven to the Cliffs by Mason Barnet. Describes its natural beauty. Bough a present for Mary Payne’s wedding. Also tells Charles about her reading.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 18

  • Box 34, Folder 12
Ria is upset and lonely. Louise, one of Mrs. Pepper’s younger sisters is very ill. Note in blue ink is in hand of Elizabeth Blanford. She had a frank talk with Dr. Hume who says she is progressing well and should deliver the last week in July. She mentions baby clothes brought by a Mrs Hendrick and a Mrs. Dudley. She relates the rigorous pursuit by Robert Burns Wilson of Helen Page. She and May drove out to the Cliffs. She asks if Nora is with Capt Sharpe or Mrs Bradford. Nora was a servant who had worked for them. Mentions a Mrs. Carter, Mrs. Gill in Columbus.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 26

  • Box 34, Folder 13
She mentions cutting a bucket full of little plantain to occupy herself. Also notes a visit from Miss Mag and Miss Eliza (no further identification). Also mentions attempt to rent a house to a Mr. Burnham.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 May 28

  • Box 34, Folder 14
Ria talks about a shopping trip in Harry’s interest. Harry is probably the name they have chosen if their unborn child is a boy. Charles’s brother Harry was killed in a shooting in Louisville in the early 1880s that was probably politically motivated. Mentions Charles coming to see her in June and praises Col. Poland, Charles’s commanding officer in that context. Mentions Capt. Roberts. Mrs. Johnson and Maimie Scott had visited. Pinnie was helping her. Notes in blue ink are in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford. She identifies Mike, the pet monkey, and Dick, May’s friend.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1897 May 31

  • Box 34, Folder 15
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 4

  • Box 34, Folder 16
Flem is one of Miss Pepper’s servants. Mentions a Mrs Grumley. Some financial info. Ria writes of their unborn child, unsure of its gender. Mentions notices in the Courier and the Times (Louisville) of Uncle Charley Jacob’s marriage. He married a Miss Bullitt.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 7

  • Box 34, Folder 17
Ria writes of her activities and of Teetee’s (Lucretia Hart Clay) illness. The family had purchased a croquet set. The monkey Mike tended to interrupt the game by grabbing a ball. Mentions a visit from two women named Rodgers. Their husbands were the sons of cousin Eliza Rodgers
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 7

  • Box 34, Folder 18
Ria relates information about the cost of her wedding trousseau and arrangements to credit some of it against her share of the estate when it is settled. The letter is largely financial information.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 8

  • Box 34, Folder 19
She writes about setting a time for a visit from Mrs. Clay and Teetee. She seems to defend Charles Jacob to her husband. She notes that he has withdrawn from the mayor’s race in Louisville, looks a good deal like Susan M. Clay. Apparently Charles Jacob is marrying a Miss Bullitt. Mentions Alex Hensley, Mr. and Mrs. Corgell, Christine Reynolds and Mamie Scott
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 8

  • Box 34, Folder 20
Ria is putting up strawberry preserves. She mentions keeping Flem, a servant, busy picking them. Elizabeth Blanford confirms that her parents referred to the unborn child as Harry. Ria notes the movement of the baby.
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Mrs. Charles Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 9

  • Box 34, Folder 21
Susan mildly chastises Charles for going to a park on Sunday. Her mother thinks she is going to have a daughter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 10

  • Box 34, Folder 22
Ria relates a visit by Mrs. Barrett and Mrs. Bailey. She has been cleaning and mending. A letter from Teetee mentioned a visit by Katie Johnson.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1897 June 11

  • Box 34, Folder 23 - 24
Ria writes of her love for Charles then shifts to news. Mrs. Clay and Teetee had visited. She mentions a man in relation to photos taken of Mrs. Clay but the name is illegible. She mentions a Mrs. Barrett who had told her Charles’s march from Columbus to Fort Thomas had been postponed. She writes about Mrs. Bailey’s peach crop.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 12

  • Box 34, Folder 25
Brief letter—mentions a Mrs. Burnham, making strawberry preserves.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1897 June 13

  • Box 34, Folder 26 - 27
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 15

  • Box 34, Folder 28
Ria writes of receiving his letters and wishing for more. She had a conversation with Lena (her half sister) and described a summer dinner she had enjoyed. Mentioned Mr Smith, a Mrs. J and a Miss R. She was surprised that the latter two had joined the Catholic church. She referred to the baby as Harry.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 16

  • Box 34, Folder 29
Letter contains news of Frankfort and people Charles would know. Ria tells Charles she has invited Teetee and his mother for a visit in July when Charles will be visiting. She startled family when she asked to go fishing in a party Frank Cannon was leading (She would have a child on July 21) Lena, her half sister, is with them, but her husband, Clay Hatchett will arrive to attend funeral of James Harlan, his uncle, who was killed by a train in Louisville. Mentions Lyne, probably Lyne Starling, who was coming from school in Danville (probably Centre College). Hopes he can help decipher Tom Smith’s formula for developing film. See letter of June 20, 1897.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 18

  • Box 34, Folder 30
Ria kids Charles about joining him in a soldier’s march. Pin took Mr. (Tom) Smith’s formula for developing photographs to Thomas (Averill). She notes that Lena and Little Lyne (probably Lyne Godecke) are set to travel. The family has reserved a Novel filly for him. She mentions the funeral of Mr. Harlan and a postponed fishing trip.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 20

  • Box 34, Folder 31
Ria writes about attempting to make raspberry jam with her Aunt Laura. She and Pinnie have also tried to develop film with a formula provided by Charles and Tom Smith, Pinnie’s future husband. She also mentions visits from Mr. Macklin and Mr. Chinn.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 22

  • Box 34, Folder 32
Chatty letter. Ria has been to town to shop and get t he mail. Mentions Charles’s march from Columbus barracks to Fort Thomas. If able she wants to visit. She is out quite a bit to be 8 months pregnant. Mentions a conversation that spoke of people Charles apparently knew. Expressed her dislike of racetracks but wished she could have accompanied him on a pleasure trip to Minerva Park. She wants a cousin Starling Loving to visit.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 22

  • Box 34, Folder 33
Brief letter assuring him that she is feeling well. Notes a short rain but the farmers say the harvest will go on. (they were somewhat dependent on the income from a small farm Ria inherited.) She says she is going to try to tone the photographs. She and Pin have been experimenting with developing film.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 23

  • Box 34, Folder 34
Ria, her mother, and sisters Pinnie and Lizzie picked raspberries. Lollie and Sissie came from town with her letter. Ria and Pinnie successfully developed their film (photographs) with the help to Thomas Averill. She describes the developing process for Charles. She describes the antics of Mike, the monkey. She asked Charles if he is interested in the Queen’s Jubilee. Her mother has ordered souvenir coups.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 June 30

  • Box 34, Folder 35
Mentions a visit from Virginia Hunt who has just returned from Hong Cong and Rose Crittenden. Describes the harvest of the wheat crop in great detail. Mr Macklin and Mr. Chinn are supposed to visit and share ideas. According to Elizabeth Blanford’s note those ideas involve breaking up the horse business after the death of Robert Pepper.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, circa 1897 July

  • Box 34, Folder 36
Ria writes about a visit from Dr. Hume and her nagging aches and pains resulting from her pregnancy. She mentioned the photos of Mrs. Clay. Letter contains news of family, Frank Cannon, the monkey Mike.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July

  • Box 34, Folder 37
Letter dated internally; she says it is one week until her due date. Susan was born July 1897. She writes about Charles’s trip to Chicago and the impending birth.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 2

  • Box 34, Folder 38
Pin and Ria went to the station to get the nurse Miss Lynch. Ria hopes they like each other,. Harry Bush had stopped for a visit. Notes having a telephone. She talks about Charles’s family.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 3

  • Box 34, Folder 39
Ria writes of her activities. One of the farm hands, Jim Burns, will mail it for her. She and Miss Lynch are sitting near open windows because of the heat. Miss Lynch is sewing and Ria is reading John Fox’s new story, The Kentuckians. She mentions the literary flowering in Kentucky---(James Lane) Allen, John Fox, Corvain, and Robert Burns Wilson. Also mentions Thomas Nelson Page. John Cannon was out for a visit. Asks for Tom Smith’s photograph developing formulas.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 5

  • Box 34, Folder 40
Letter notes the extreme heat and the delight she took in a bath. Notes closeness of her due date. A Miss Lynch is with them. She may be a nurse for Ria.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 6

  • Box 34, Folder 41
After describing the weather and some personal news she writes about John Fox Jr.’s latest work that Charles had mentioned in an earlier letter. She prefers James Lane Allen because of his observations on nature. She notes that Mrs. Clay is happy to think she will have a namesake.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 7

  • Box 34, Folder 42
Ria is expecting a visit from Mrs. Clay and Teetee. She mentions talking to Christine Reynolds on the telephone.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1897 July 8

  • Box 34, Folder 43 - 44
Ris busy fixing preserves with Miss Lynch, the nurse, and preparing for a visit from Mrs. Clay and Teetee. She refers to Harry, the name for the child she is expecting if it is a boy. Tells a story about Mike the pet monkey. Describes Miss Lynch who makes $15 per week. She describes a flower pit she wants him to prepare at their Columbus home. Mentions a Mr. Hardaway and a Mrs. Grumley.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 9

  • Box 34, Folder 45
Ria writes about the visit of Mrs. Clay and Teetee. She tells Charley she is afraid they expected to see a Lily Langtry in her. She makes humorous comments about her physique during pregnancy. She expresses some anxiety about pregnancy.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 10

  • Box 34, Folder 46
Ria writes about the visit of Mrs. Clay and Teetee, taking pictures, rushing to catch the train. She also mentions that Mr. Macklin had been trying to train horses to the carriage for them.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 12

  • Box 34, Folder 47
Ria writes a hurried letter so it can be mailed. It hurries from subject to subject saying little. She mentions Flem, Frank Cannon and Susan M. Clay’s photos. She wrote to Mrs. Grumley and will write to Mrs. Lyon at Columbus. Envies Charles’s trips to Minerva Park.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 14

  • Box 34, Folder 48
She notes that she is sending him honey and preserves. Describes how cold it is for July. Mentions Harry but no further information. Cuts letter short because her sister is in a hurry.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 15

  • Box 34, Folder 49
Ria is homesick and wishes Charles was with her. She mentions several photographs taken by a Mr. Mattern—one of Mrs. Clay with Duncan under a tree and on of Mrs. Clay and Teetee in front of the house.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 16

  • Box 34, Folder 50
The Clays send Charles’s baby cup given him by his uncle Charles Jacob. Mentions two physicians at Columbus—Dr. Ten Eyck and Dr. Waters. Ria’s physician in Frankfort was Dr. Hume. She was not feeling well. Susan was born 5 days later.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 July 17

  • Box 34, Folder 51
Ria talks about having fresh blackberries, canning blackberries and tomatoes. Ria wants additional shelves in their pantry for the vegetables. She commiserates with Charles who had gone to a Dutch supper and did not like the smells. Ria and Pin are upset to learn that Dr. TenEyck is leaving Columbus.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August

  • Box 34, Folder 52
Ria writes a short note saying she and Susan are doing well. (Charles was in camp near Visalia in August.)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 5

  • Box 34, Folder 53
Ria writes for the first time since Susan’s birth. She is now allowed to sit up. Miss Lynch is the nurse hired for her. She explains why she was frustrated with Charles when he did not telegraph after arriving in Columbus from Chicago. Ria is looking forward to returned to Columbus around the 21st. She notes how helpful her family has been.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1897 August 8

  • Box 34, Folder 54 - 55
Brief letter—praises Susan but notes her impatience.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1897 August 9

  • Box 34, Folder 56 - 57
Praises Susan. Nursing her as she writes.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 10

  • Box 34, Folder 58
Praises Susan. Miss Lynch took her for her first walk out doors. Charles saw Cousin Starling Loving.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 11

  • Box 34, Folder 59
Ria asked her mother about the flower beds she wanted Charles to prepare. Mentions Susan. Also mentions that their chances seem nice that Mattie may agree to go with her as a servant when she returns to Columbus. Relations with African-American servants. Mentins son of Mrs. French Hoge and an impending visit from (Tom) Smith.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1897 August 15

  • Box 34, Folder 60
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 16

  • Box 34, Folder 61
Ria apologizes for her poor spelling and careless writing, promising to do better. She is anticipating a visit from Charles and Mr. (Tom) Smith and for the permanent reunification of her family. She is concerned about replacing the servant Nora. She discusses the purchase of a stove and how they will keep Susan warm. She wants Charles to get the opinion of Dr. Loving’s Annie (another servant). She discusses pay for a cook . She mentions that Rebecca (?) has come out with Mason Brown and Mason Barrel to go bicycling with May. She will ask Lizzie to print pictures of portraits for Dr. Loving. Christine (Reynolds) and Fanny Crittenden came to see Susan. George Clay had written her a real playful and very pleasant letter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 17

  • Box 34, Folder 62
Ria declined an invitation to visit the Averills though Lollie and Sissie intend to go. (Lollie is Mrs. Elizabeth Pepper’s sister, Ria’s aunt.) Mentions correspondence with Governor Bradley but does not explain it Ria notes engagement of Charley Roberts and Eugenia B…….. then makes a humorous comment which Charles would apparently understand. Mary Jackson, Susan’s mammy, reminds Ria to sing Daddy’s song to Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 August 18

  • Box 34, Folder 63
Ria speaks of Susan. Mary Jackson came to see her and thought she saw a Clay likeness. Notes from Miss Riza Watkins. Ria recalls meeting her on a walk near Balgowan. Ria mentions trying to hire Matha to replace Miss Lynch.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 3

  • Box 34, Folder 64
Ria writes of a proposed trip to town and of Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 4

  • Box 35, Folder 1
Had received a telegram from Charles. She describes Susan trying to communicate with Mary (Jackson) , her nurse. She will see about sending some furnishings for their house. Tells Charles she wants a good petting when they are reunited.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 5

  • Box 35, Folder 2
Ria writes about Susan and an outing on the lawn of her mother’s house. Dr. Hume says Susan will have curly hair.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 6

  • Box 35, Folder 3
Ria writes of eating baked apples and watermelon. Charley is to entertain three ladies at their post house. She writes about the Dickinsons in some detail. She describes Mary Jackson, Susan’s mammy and mentions trying to get Martha to come to Columbus as a cook.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 7

  • Box 35, Folder 4
Letter dated by anniversary of marriage on September 8, 1896. Ria writes of how blessed they are by marriage and birth of Susan. She looked about a wedding present for Thomas and Mary (Averill) and a present for Mrs. Worley’s stepdaughter but decided to wait until Charles had learned of her marriage. She asks Charles about his guest then relates a conversation with Martha, a servant she hoped to retain as a cook. Martha was indignant over perceived treatment by Charles and Ria. Nor was she inclined to move to Columbus. Urged Charles to seek help of Dr. Loving in getting a cook.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1897 September 8

  • Box 35, Folder 5 - 6
Ria describes a cup given to Susan by Mrs. Clay. Reminds Charles that a year ago they had just about arrived at the Gault House, a Louisville hotel. Urges Charles to write to Pinnie.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 11

  • Box 35, Folder 7
Ria tells Charles she was not feeling sad when she wrote him. She says the furniture was shipped on Thursday. Asks him to get a new door to keep out the cold air. Urges Charles not to think she is sad.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 12

  • Box 35, Folder 8
Ria relays news of the family. Sisters and mother plan trips to Cincinnati to have dresses fitted, etc. They catch the train in Georgetown. She has purchased a gift for a wedding. Tom and Mary will wed. She mentions no last name.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 13

  • Box 35, Folder 9
Ria writes of giving Susan a bath. She is anxious to know if Charles will be able to visit. Frank Cannon visited and much taken with Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 14

  • Box 35, Folder 10
Ria indulged herself by eating an apple and it caused Susan to have colic. Praises Susan. She is glad Charles was able to see Dr. Loving.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 15

  • Box 35, Folder 11
A short note speaking of Susan having an attack of colic but improving by morning. Mrs. Pepper met the girls (probably some of her daughters) in Georgetown for an overnight trip to Cincinnati. She was rushed so Flem, a servant, could get the letter to town.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 17

  • Box 35, Folder 12
Ria is uneasy because her mother is away. Mrs. Pepper helps when Susan has the cholic. She writes about the things he has done to their Columbus home and of a visit by Margaretta Johnson and Mary Harrison. They noted how happy Charles’s family was over Susan. Mentions especially Mrs. Clay and Tom. She plans to buy a gift for Miss Worley as Charles suggested in another letter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1897 September 18

  • Box 35, Folder 13
Ria writes delightfully of Susan. Mrs. Pepper returned from Cincinnati with gifts for all. She also mentions that Sissie, May, and Pin, her sisters play with Susan. Mentions Mr. Cannon and Flem in relation to acquiring the mail.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, circa 1898

  • Box 35, Folder 14
News from home; a visit from Uncle Will Starling but Ria’s mother is away. Her sister May is there. Heavy religious overtones to letter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay fragment, 1898

  • Box 35, Folder 15
Ria is in Frankfort. General news. Charles is trying to become the Brigade Adjutant and is getting help from Cousin Starling. Notes visitors—Ellen Bush, harry Bush and family. Describes Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898

  • Box 35, Folder 16
Thomas J. Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay letter dated June 4, 1898 enclosed. Also two photographs
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898

  • Box 35, Folder 17
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, circa 1898 March 26

  • Box 35, Folder 18
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 April

  • Box 35, Folder 19
Refers to topics found in her letter of April 23, 1898. Cousin Starling, a doctor has visited her and declared her healthy; Pin and Sissie are packing for the trip home. Charles is in Thomasville.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, circa 1898 April-June

  • Box 35, Folder 20
Ria has apparently returned to Frankfort given the people named in the letter. Mentions her sister Sissie’s friends visiting. Mentions a telephone conversation with Christine (Reynolds) and a dispute between Christine and Sissie. Christine had been brother Robert Pepper’s fiancé before his death in 1896. Also mentions Frank Chinn, a Frankfort man who helped with farming and financial matters. Her reference to mother near the end of the letter is most likely a reference to Charles’s mother, Mrs. Susan M. Clay.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 20

  • Box 35, Folder 21
She dated letter April 20, 1896 but that is incorrect. Ria forwards names of people living in Tampa who have Kentucky connections—R.P. Jacob, Mrs. H.L. Watterson etc. Also notes givts to her and visitors—Mrs. Pland, Cousin Pamela, Cousin Mary, Mrs. Morehead, Eliza Rodgers, and others Charles would know.Mentions a letter from Mrs. Susan M. Clay. Dr. Loving pronounced her health good. Describes Susan’s actions.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1898 April 23

  • Box 35, Folder 22
Charles has left for the Cuban expedition. Ria’s sisters went to Columbus, Ohio (base of 17th Infantry) to help her prepare to move back to her mother’s home in Frankfort. She mentions Cousin Starling, a relative of her mother, Sissie and Pinnie—two sisters, and others who are apparently residents of Columbus who Charles would know—Pennick Rogers, Mrs. H. Brown. Mary Jackson, an African-American servant, had gone with the Clays from Lexington to Columbus and was Susan Clay’s nurse.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1898 April 25

  • Box 35, Folder 23 - 24
Expresses her depression over his absence. They are packing to leave Columbus and saying their goodbyes to friends and relatives of the area. Note on envelope is in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 April 28

  • Box 35, Folder 25
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 1

  • Box 35, Folder 26
General family news. Shares her news about the war with him. Agrees to see Mr. Chinn about Charles’s insurance policy.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 4

  • Box 35, Folder 27
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 5

  • Box 35, Folder 28
Spanish American war. Susan has whooping cough and Mrs. Pepper, Lollie, and Sissie have colds. Mentions Dr. Hume and a private nurse, Miss Lustneau. Tom Smith’s drawings arrived and Ria is delighted. Tells story of Pinnie mounting a horse for a photograph to send to Tom Smith but deathly afraid of horses. Describes a pet monkey named Mike.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 16

  • Box 35, Folder 29
News paper clipping enclosed. Tells about the weather then notes visitors—Mr. and Mrs. Sam Johnson and others. Notes Susan’s delight at receiving her father’s photograph. Sends Tom clay’s note about wheat crop to Charles.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 17

  • Box 35, Folder 30
Complains about the irregularity of the mail service. Describes Susan’s efforts to get someone to play with her. The nurse has suggested they play with her too much which will make her nervous. General family news.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 19

  • Box 35, Folder 31
Chatty letter mostly about susan; Delighted that he has attended the Episcopal services.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 21

  • Box 35, Folder 32
Ria expresses in very religious terms her hopes for reuniting with her husband and the dangers of war. Talks about a railway being near completing but the raiders declare that it will not be allowed to remain. They want a free turnpike.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 23

  • Box 35, Folder 33
Ria responds to comments made in Charles’s earlier letters. Delighted that he is now the adjutant and raises many questions about Col Poland, Col Haskell, and Captain Rogers. News of Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 May 25

  • Box 35, Folder 34
Ria jokes about Charles’s ego since being appointed adjutant. Shows her sense of humor. Also kids him about a comment made by Will Hall saying Susan was pretty but would be prettier if she looked more like her mother and less like her father.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1898 May 29

  • Box 35, Folder 35
General news. Praises Susan, Wheat price has reached 1.70. Notes sketches drawn by Tom Smith
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1898 May 30

  • Box 35, Folder 36
General letter discussing her activities and those of Susan. Notes visitors to Frankfort and family visits to others. Names include. Frank Cannon, Mr. Marks, Mason Brown, the Broadheads, Belle Brick, and Lucy Alexander, Henry Clay Wilson
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June

  • Box 35, Folder 37
Ria is delighted with sale of wheat. She will send Charles $100 to buy the horse he needs as Adjutant and she will pay bills in Columbus and Lexington. She expresses happiness at being able to help Charles with finances. Mentions that Susan is in the yard with Mary (Jackson), and a negro picnic in the park with an atrocious band. She tells Charles the authorities are not sure they will need a new regiment after all. Wonders how many college boys Capt Shelby will enlist.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 1

  • Box 35, Folder 39
She sends news of Susan. Mentions a letter from Teetee Clay and says she will enclose it. It is not with this letter. Mentions a visit from an Aunt Kate Starling and asks Charles if he has heard from Cousin Starling who is helping him secure position of Colonel in a unit of volunteers.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 2

  • Box 35, Folder 40
Ria met Capt Garrard with Mrs. Rodman. Garrard had promised Charles he would try to call on Ria. They joked about Governor Bradley’s treatment of Kentuckians and a later reference says he will make a promise today and break it tomorrow. Ria tells Charles Mr. Macklin, the farm overseer, wants to get him a horse in Kentucky and describes the type he will need. Uncertain who Dick is but may be Richard Menifee Ried, a family friend.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 3

  • Box 35, Folder 38
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 4

  • Box 35, Folder 42
Ria mentions the check for $100 she plans to send him. Sketches and photographs sent by Tom Smith to Pinnie. They are not quite a couple yet, apparently, but Ria is interested. Some war news—rumor that the Merrimac had been sunk by the Spanish.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 7

  • Box 35, Folder 43
Ria has learned that Charles has been ordered to Cuba. She gains strength from her faith.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 10

  • Box 35, Folder 44
General letter about her home. She writes about a litter of pups and her mother’s cook Nettie.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 12

  • Box 35, Folder 45
Ria responds to Charles letter about the discomfort of the troops. She calls the Cincinnati Enquirer a sensational mean old paper. She praises Charles’s brother Tom as so manly and so tender.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 13

  • Box 35, Folder 46
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 15

  • Box 35, Folder 47
Ria recounts the newspaper stories of the transports leaving Florida for Cuba. She tells Charles about a party her mother gave on a trolley car supplied by a Mr. Buckly. Mrs. Susan M. Clay and Teetee came down. Some information about social life and hospitality. On a visit to Margaret Johnson, she insisted that Teetee and Mrs. Clay spend part of their visit with her.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 19

  • Box 35, Folder 48
The letter is mostly about the wheat crop, the cost of insurance, storage, etc. Tom Clay is helping her with it and she is very pleased with him.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, circa 1898-1899 June 19

  • Box 35, Folder 49
In blue ink Elizabeth Clay Blanford suggests the letter was written in 1899, but it may be 1898. Other letters refer to the problem with Mike, the pet Monkey. The monkey was sent to the Cincinnati Zoo though this letter suggests it would be taken back to Phoenix, Arizona by a Mrs. H off. Ria mentions Egmont Keys near Tampa and Cousin Starling. Mrs. Elizabeth P. Pepper was a starling. Ria mentions a disagreement between her sister Sissie and Christine Reynolds, who had been expected to marry brother Robert P. Pepper Jr. before his death in 1896. Also mentions a family trip to Niagara. The Registration Roll mentioned at the end of the letter may be the list of children who contributed to the Women’s War Relief in 1898. See letter of June 12, 1898
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 20

  • Box 35, Folder 50
Ria tells him that the family left for Niagara Falls over the Midland. She also paid remaining bills from their time in Columbus out of her money and writes about how she sees her money being used. Notes that Mike, the pet monkey will go away that afternoon. According to Elizabeth Clay Blanford’s note the monkey bit Susan so was given to the Cincinnati Zoo.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 21

  • Box 35, Folder 51
Spanish American War Some war news. Lena, her half sister, has joined her in Frankfort. Rest of family is in Niagara. Rebecca Johnson is also visiting.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 25

  • Box 35, Folder 52
Ria recounts the affect of a storm on telephone lines. Susan’s actions. Asks Charles how the army will handle mail with the men in Cuba.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 27

  • Box 35, Folder 53
Spanish American War Ris interprets the newspapers in the most positive manner because she wants the war over. Interesting aspect of social life. Some of May’s friends came out, spent the night and appear ready to stay over to dinner.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 28

  • Box 35, Folder 54
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 29

  • Box 35, Folder 55
Personal news about Ria and Susan. She is frustrated with herself for reading the sensationalist newspapers. Dick, a servant, is mentioned as is Mr. Macklin and Frank Chinn.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 June 30

  • Box 35, Folder 41
Letter expressing her love; sent $5 to the National War Relief Association so Susan would lead the list of patriotic children (Teetee had already done it) Other family members would contribute too. Cautioned Charles not to eat green Cuban fruit.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 4

  • Box 35, Folder 56
Spanish American War. Letter had to be 1898 because Charles is in Tampa. Ria writes glowingly of daughter Susan. Shows relationship between husband, wife, and daughter. She warns him about trusting any Cuban with Spanish blood in their veins.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1898 July 5

  • Box 35, Folder 57 - 58
Rumors in Lexington that Charles was wounded so Tom asked a favor of General Nelson Miles. Ria relieved. Has read accounts of battle at El Caney. Mentions Mr. (Henri) Lyons and Tom Sharpe relative to the battle. Pinnie lets Ria read Tom Smith’s letters and see his sketches so she feels more in touch with Charles.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 7

  • Box 35, Folder 59
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 8

  • Box 35, Folder 60
Enclosed is letter from Susan M. Clay to Mrs.Charles Clay July 7, 1898. Susan M. Clay is very worried about her son. (She has lost 5 other children) Means to comfort Ria but may make it worse. She and Teetee also want addresses of men killed or wounded at El Caney so they can write in support. Ria’s letter notes promotions of Henry Ware Lawton and Leonard Wood. Expresses concern over Dickinson and Haskell. Ria tells Charles that Lena, her half sister is with her to help with Susan. She also asks about Tom Smith.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 9

  • Box 35, Folder 61
newspaper clipping enclosed. Spanish American War. Good letter for American patriotism and lack of understanding of the real issues leading to the Spanish American War. Mentions a visit to Christine (Reynolds) and a visit from (Frank) Chinn.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 13

  • Box 35, Folder 62
Worried about yellow fever. Very distraught letter because she is homesick and worried.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 14

  • Box 35, Folder 63
Santiago has surrendered and Ria is elated because she thinks Charles will be coming home. Mentions an American newspaper printed in Cuba and Henri Lyons role at San Juan Hill.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 15

  • Box 35, Folder 64
Describes a kind of chain letter to raise money for military ambulances. She informs him about threshing of wheat. And describes Susan’s antics.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 16

  • Box 35, Folder 65
References to Cuba date the year of the letter. Ria rides a rollercoaster of emotions reading the newspapers’ conflicting reports. Tells Charles about a ride with Susan into the country.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 17

  • Box 35, Folder 66
Spanish American War Delight at receiving his letter. She has heard that the Spanish troops are being sent home but she thinks it more important to send U.S. troops home. Family news and issues.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 18

  • Box 35, Folder 67
Heard from a friend who had served with Charles that he was well (Received a lot of news from returning soldiers). Concerned about Yellow Fever. Also notes General Miles expedition to Puerto Rico. Army surgeons nixed idea of taking regular soldiers, tired by the war in Cuba, to Puerto Rico. Feels sympathy for Mrs. Dickinson and Mrs. Michie in deaths of their husbands.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 20

  • Box 35, Folder 68
Describes a shopping trip with Susan and Mary Jackson in Frankfort. Gifts chosen for Susan’s first birthday (July 21) indicate the patriotism of the time.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 21

  • Box 35, Folder 69
Writes about Susan and her birthday presents. She is happy to have heard that regulars who fought in Cuba will not have to fight in Puerto Rico. Suggests a problem in army with Yellow Fever.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 22

  • Box 35, Folder 70
Family news—members of the family had just returned from a month long trip to Niagara. Pinnie visited a friend, Ruth Ruddell in Kokomo, Ind. Passed information from Mr. Macklin and Tom Clay to Charles about the wheat crop.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 24

  • Box 35, Folder 71
Ria notes her irritability and thinks Charles can help her control it.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 26

  • Box 35, Folder 72
Notes sale of wheat and some military comments
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 27

  • Box 36, Folder 1
Ria is afraid of Yellow Fever. She had read newspaper accounts of the battle at El Caney and the charge up San Juan Hill.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 29

  • Box 36, Folder 2
Spanish American War. Military news she had gleaned from papers. Hopes war will soon be over. Mentions Frank C (Cannon)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 31

  • Box 36, Folder 3
Spanish American War. Long section on war and its horrors. Ria thinks she has an idea of what is was like from a detailed letter Tom Smith wrote to Pinnie and from magazines such as Harper’s Weekly. She will make a scrapbook about the war.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1898 August

  • Box 36, Folder 4
General letter with news from home. Mother is Mrs. Susan M. Clay; Tom is Thomas J. Clay, Charles’s brother. Mentions Sam Johnson; Uncle Charley. Both may be relatives on the Jacob side of the family. Charles Jacob, mayor of Louisville, was Mrs. Susan M. Clay’s brother. Her sister Lucy was married to a Darwin Johnson.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 3

  • Box 36, Folder 5
Spanish American War Ria writes what she knows about the war. Mentions a letter from Tom Clay and an invitation for Mrs. Pepper, Susan, Mary Jackson, and Ria to visit at Balgowan, Susan M. Clay’s home. Some information on servants---Mary Jackson in Frankfort and Effie in Columbus and Ria’s attitude toward them.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 8

  • Box 36, Folder 6
Spanish American War. Ria thinks it is over. Talks about a visit to Teetee and Mrs. Clay.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 12

  • Box 36, Folder 7
Spanish American War. Wrote to Mrs. Poland about death of Col. Poland. Sister May and Nan Clay returned from Estill (Irvine). Mentions Rebecca Johnson. News of daughter Susan indicating attitudes about child raising.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 14

  • Box 36, Folder 8
Notes still breast feeding Susan. Worked hard because Susan’s mammy, Mary Jackson, was off. Mentions Beck Johnson, Mrs. Brown and Hord. Notes letter of Col. Haskell to Tom (Clay)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 August 28

  • Box 63, Folder 53
Spanish American War. Letter shows growing impact of the war on Ria Clay. She is much more religious. Mentions meeting David Stone, a man who met Charles on the eve of the first battle in Cuba. Mentions Mrs. Worley, Margaretta Johnson—local friends
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1898 September 23

  • Box 36, Folder 9
Thanks him for his letters. Effie and a friend expect to join them for the winter. She asks him about the 17th Infantry and where various regiments might be assigned. Tom Smith has been appointed adjutant. She is encouraging him to get a place prepared because she wants to join him. That is unusual. Usually she refuses to join him, preferring to stay in Frankfort. Mentions the wheat crop and that it was sent to a warehouse owned by Joe LeCompte and Lucas Brodhead. Mentions Mr. Macklin who operated the farms for the Pepper women.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1899 January 8

  • Box 36, Folder 10
Telegram. Charles on way to Philippines. Cheerful update on spirit at home. Clay was on the U.S. transport General Grant.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Captain Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 14

  • Box 36, Folder 11
Mentions Nan Clay who is visiting. Sweet letter to her husband. Mentions enclosing a letter from Teetee but it is not there
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1899 January 17

  • Box 36, Folder 12 - 13
Difficulties of communicating by telegram; mentions that Tom (Clay) had telephoned to check on them. Mentions communicating with Mrs. Perry who they had known in Columbus. Ria tells Charles about Susan and her actions. Encloses in the letter a note from Edith Jacob, the wife of Charles Jacob. Charles Clay had helped improve relations between his mother and Uncle by seeing that the body of Charles Jacob’s son was sent back to Louisville.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 18

  • Box 36, Folder 14
Ria makes usual remarks about missing him and notes problems with the mail. Susan has mild case of whooping cough. She mentions several newspaper articles about Charles.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Captain Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 22

  • Box 36, Folder 15
Ria notes that Susan is 18 months old; affectionate comments to Charles who is on his way to the Philippines.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 28

  • Box 36, Folder 16
Mentions a Mrs. Perry whom they had known in Columbia, Katie Johnson, Bakers Art Gallery. Relates health problem of Tom Smith who has the chills and Pinnie’s efforts to care for him. Mention’s Thomas and Mary Averill and their daughter. Spoke to Dick and Margaretta Johnson.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 January 31

  • Box 36, Folder 17
Ria living at Capitol Hotel. The Cliffs suffers from extreme cold. Tells Charles a story about a group of people May invites out on Saturday nights for cards and a sleep over. They went to a pond behind Mr. Wilson’s house (Possibly Robert Burns Wilson) and broke through the ice. Party included Nan Clay, Dick, May, Mason Brown, Edmond Rodman and Frank Canon. Mentions a visit from Christine (Reynolds)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 13-March 7

  • Box 63, Folder 32
Three letters in one envelope. Some news of troop movements and an incident at Port Said. Ria reads the reports of General Henry Ware Lawton to keep up with Charles.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 1-2

  • Box 36, Folder 18
Ria notes her tendency to fall asleep easily. She is expecting their second child. Recounts news of Susan, mentions the departure of the second battalion under Capt Brush for the Philippines. Notes that she visited Mary and her daughter Rebecca.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 4

  • Box 36, Folder 19
Ria tells Charles about a dance to be given by Rebecca and Ellen Johnson and Ruth Ely. Nan Clay and May are in town and her mother was there earlier in the day. Mentions a conversation with Margaretta Johnson.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 8

  • Box 36, Folder 20
She writes of the bitter cold. She has asked Pinnie to go to the Ohio State Journal to get a copy of the speech he gave honoring the men of the 17th Infantry.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 10

  • Box 36, Folder 21
fragment. Ria writes of a dance, a german, attended by Nan Clay and May. Ria watched the dancers and was a little concerned about what people would say. Note in blue ink in hand of Elizabeth Blanford says her mother was pregnant with second child. Saxton was playing for the german.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 11

  • Box 36, Folder 22
Ria writes of a heavy snowfall that has kept her mother from coming into town from the Cliffs. Also writes sensitively of Susan and how she talks about her father.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 18

  • Box 36, Folder 23
Sentimental letter expressing great homesickness. Dependent upon religion for comfort.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 22

  • Box 36, Folder 24
Ria writes about paying bills in Columbus. She asked her mother for advice and notes possibility of borrowing from her mother.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 23

  • Box 36, Folder 25
Begins letter with somewhat racist comments about the Philippines. Mentions dispute between Secretary Alger and the President. Alger expected to resign. Notes public criticism of Alger and praise for Miles (probably Nelson Miles.) An article in the St Louis Globe described the sea voyage from New York to Gibraltar according to a Lt. E.G. Smith.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 4

  • Box 36, Folder 52
Blue ink notes in hand of Elizabeth Blanford. As noted Ria and Susan stayed at the Capitol Hotel in Frankfort while the rest of the family lived at the Cliffs at Thorn Hill, Frankfort. General family news and rumors of small pox on board one of the ships carrying troops to the Philippines.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 6

  • Box 36, Folder 53
Letter internally dated Feb 26, 27, 28. Ria is homesick and expects Charles is too. Mentions a visit from May and Beck (Rebecca) Johnson and Susan’s dislike of Johnson. Sisters are going to Cincinnati for the opera so her mother is going to stay in the hotel with Ria. Ria read news of the Philippines.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 12

  • Box 36, Folder 26
Ria delighted to receive a cable from Charles and marvels at its speed. Mentions a dinner with the Averills and meeting a young woman named Easterman whose sister taught at Ogontz. Mrs. Blanford’s note indicates that Ria and two of her sisters attended the school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Ria did not stay long.) Ria feels a definite superiority to residents of the Philippines.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 16

  • Box 36, Folder 27
Brief letter while Charles away during Philippine Insurrection. Notes burning of Winslow Hotel; Mary and the baby may refer to Mary Averill and her daughter. Old Mary is probably Mary Jackson, Susan’s nursemaid
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 21

  • Box 36, Folder 28
Very effusive beginning to the letter then includes Susan in sending him love. Notes that men they know, Majors Rogers and Andrews have been given new assignments. She notes the reception at Malta of the Sherriden. Letter indicates the support of Ria’s family during Charles’s absence. Mentions Talbot Dudley, News from Teetee. Teetee wants Sissie to develop a chapter of the DAR in Frankfort, but Sissie will not, Teetee then asked Margaret Johnson
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 27

  • Box 36, Folder 29
Ria writes about Susan and the nice things people say about Charles. Expresses pride in him as a soldier.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 May 2

  • Box 36, Folder 30
Susan had been sick with the croup, but is better. Refers to a letter of Tom and an article she has asked him to write. This could be Tom Smith or Tom Clay. Mentions Effie and Sissie. Sissie is Ria’s sister.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 May 26

  • Box 36, Folder 31
Ria welcomes Charles back to the United States. Wounded in the Philippines he was accompanied home by Ria’s sister, Pinnie. Ria notes that Pinnie’s husband, Tom Smith, telegraphed from the Philippines that he was well. Pinnie would make the voyage to the Philippines again to be with her husband.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 June 29

  • Box 36, Folder 32
Sentimental letter. Ria hopes a letter is on its way from Gibraltar. Dr. Hume stopped by to check on Susan and a Dr. Baxter also came by. She is living at the hotel.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1899 July 20

  • Box 36, Folder 33
dated from internal information i.e., Susan (Susie) Clay’s second birthday would be July 21, 1899. Letter on day of Charles Clay’s surgery to remove bullet from wound received at BanLac, the Philippines. Tom is Charles’ brother; Dr. Barrow may have been associated with Good Samaritan Hospital because the surgery was done there. Charles refused to have the bullet removed until after the birth of his son Charles Jr.; mentions Courier Journal article, General Hall(s); Ria’s sister’s Sissie and May Pepper.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 July 24

  • Box 36, Folder 34
Charles has surgery to remove the bullet and repair wound received in Philippines. Letter shows support of family members. Mentions a Miss Lynde, Lynda Payne Kerr, and a Lt. Jackson. Note in blue ink is in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford. (Lynda Payne Kerr is the wife of Judge Charles Kerr.)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 December 23

  • Box 36, Folder 35
Charles in Nashville. Ria mentions that Harry Bush, a family friend hopes to see him. News of the children and Charley Jr.’s illness.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 November 28

  • Box 36, Folder 36
Dating based on contents of letter (Thanksgiving). Charles has just arrived in San Francisco. Ria hopes he will like Col. Goodale, the commanding officer. Urges Charles to behave himself and reminds him of duty to family. Also expresses loneliness without him. Describes a drive she and the children took with Tom (could be Tom Smith or Thomas J. Clay). Mentions the Roses hotels and the suicide of Stuart Young. [The November 29, 1901 New York Times ran an article on the then former city treasurer of Louisville. A $23,000 discrepancy had been found in the city’s books under his watch. He killed himself on the evening of the 27th. On the 28th the Times reported that young had systematically stolen $50,000.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 1

  • Box 36, Folder 37
Family news. She had called a Dr. James because the children were sick; he added milk to their diet. Noted a trip Tom Smith took to see his mother and good health of Elizabeth Smith. Frank Cannon played with children; Invited to a party by Mr. and Mrs. J. Swigert Taylor but declined because no fun with out him there. Mentions other Frankfort people—Mary Harrison, Margaretta Johnson, the Crittendens, Burnleys. Christine Reynolds in a highly nervous condition. Ria plans to go see her. Also mentions Rogers Clay. Letter contains a drawing by Susan
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 4

  • Box 36, Folder 38
General letter about daily events. Mary is the nurse for the children. Getting a coat for herself and coats made for the children.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles Clay, 1901 December 6

  • Box 36, Folder 39
Charles in San Francisco. Ria talks about missing Charles particularly because Tom Smith had returned to be with her sister Pinnie. Notes Elizabeth, Tom’s and Pinnie’s baby. Describes actions of Susan and Charley to their father.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 8

  • Box 36, Folder 40
Charles is in San Francisco. Ria mentions buying Christmas gifts for the family, gently chides Charles because she has not received a letter in three days.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1901 December 12

  • Box 36, Folder 41 - 42
Early letter sent to Charles at Angel Island. She mentions Col Goodale and hopes Charles gets along with him. She sends him the latest drawing of their artist daughter. Blue ink is in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 14

  • Box 36, Folder 43
News of family. Ria and children are at her mother’s house so the sisters, May and Sissie help a lot with the children.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 18

  • Box 36, Folder 44
Discusses possibility of retirement and the income they need. She may be using the children to encourage him to retire. She quotes Charley Jr. as saying I want to see my Papa. She also encloses two hearts Susan has asked her to send to him.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 20

  • Box 36, Folder 45
Says Tom Clay agrees he should pursue retirement. Suggest that Christmas increases her desire have family together. Perhaps some pressure on him here. She also includes a cut-out drawing from Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 21

  • Box 36, Folder 46
Christmas letter. Mentions Harry Bush and Uncle Pat, an old black servant. Tom’s Elizabeth is Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Tom and Pinnie Smith. She will visit frequently through the Clay children’s childhood.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 24

  • Box 36, Folder 47
Ria describes Christmas Eve at Mrs. Pepper’s house. Family letter expressing her love and letting him know the children are thinking about him.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1901 December 25

  • Box 36, Folder 48
Describes Christmas as her mother’s house and an incident involving a black servant, Uncle Pat. That story suggests one type of relationship between black and white at the turn of the century. Letter mentions Frank Cannon, Laura Pepper, Christine Reynolds, Rebecca Averill, Katie Johnson, Tom Smith, Frank Chinn, Mr. Rogers (an overseer), and Mary Jackson, the children’s mammy. Notes in blue ink are by Elizabeth Clay Blanford. [Frank Cannon 1843-1922 was a Frankfort lawyer and in 1901 served as a teacher at the First Presbyterian Church’s Leestown Mission School. Rebecca Averill also taught there.]
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 1

  • Box 36, Folder 49
Ria writes of the children, the weather, and her homesickness for him. She shows some anxiety or nervousness in the letter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 11

  • Box 36, Folder 50
Ria writes of the children. Mr. Shinkle, the barber, will make a house call to cut Charley’s hair.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 18

  • Box 36, Folder 51
Chatty letter about family. Babies are Susan and Charley; Mrs. Tarlton, Miss Wedfeld, and Christine (Reynolds) are neighbors. Christine Reynolds was engaged to Ria’s brother. Also mentions Pin (Mrs. Tom Smith), Ria’s sister and her daughter Elizabeth. Mary is the children’s caretaker.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 20

  • Box 36, Folder 54
Chatty letter talking about children. Charley knows he is Papa’s boy. Writes of other antics of children.
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Ria Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 20

  • Box 36, Folder 55
Ria writes about a hike she, Susan and Charley took with Tom Smith. She also writes about his retirement from the army and the hope that he can find some work in Kentucky.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 22

  • Box 36, Folder 56
Smallpox in the area so she had Dr. James vaccinate Susan, Charley and herself. Small pox cases are isolated in a pest house very close to them. She also relates information about the social standing of a Jim Withrow, a cousin of Sam Johnson. It seems to be a very important matter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 24

  • Box 36, Folder 57
Ria writes about headaches experienced by Tom Smith. Dr. Hume thinks it is from bad eyes, damaged by writing by candlelight in the Philippines. She is critical of the army. They seem to have no regard for man or beast. Glad will soon be comfortably out of the service.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 January 25

  • Box 36, Folder 58
Writes of extremely cold weather and a small pox scare keeping them in doors. Margaretta Johnson has invited Sissie and Ria for a game of cards. Writes briefly about the Goebel assassination trial (Howard’s) and the make-up of the jury. Lena and Mr. Hatchett are at Crab Orchard so she can gain wait. Ria questions medical theories.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 3

  • Box 36, Folder 59
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 5

  • Box 36, Folder 60
Ria writes about the children. Other family members play with them a great deal. Tom and Pinnie Smith are buying a farm in Indiana with Pin’s money.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 8

  • Box 36, Folder 61
Ria mentions wildflowers Charles sent to Susan and her delight. Mentions McCoy children, Miss Tarlton, Miss ____feldt, and Christine Reynolds. Ria went to a play called A Ca____ Comedy starring Tim Murphy. Shocked by a tax bill for $73.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 9

  • Box 36, Folder 62
Commiserates with him about infrequent letters. Concerned about danger of small pox. A yellow small pox flag marked places where it existed. Mrs. Pepper asked Dr. James to vaccinate the family. tom Smith offered several positions including railroad engineer. Hoping he will soon be home. Then abruptly says she approves of innocent amusement but does not approve of him playing cards on Sunday.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 12

  • Box 36, Folder 63
Financial information including debts she has paid. Again cautions that they need to live within their means. Also notes bills to Drs. Hume and James for medical care. She then lists things she and Mrs. Pepper want him to check at Sing Fat’s store. Shows something of the taste of the era.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 14

  • Box 36, Folder 64
Describes children making valentines and a romp in the snow with Susan. Discusses attempt to move the capital of Kentucky and the competition between Lexington and Louisville. Inquires about his appearance before a retirement board, hoping that he will soon be with them.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 15

  • Box 36, Folder 65
Ria is anxious about the decision of the board. Tells Charles about Susan and Charley. Mentions Frank Cannon who came for a hand of duplicate (bridge) with May, Lollie, and Sissie. Received a note from Teetee about donating books for soldiers in the Philippines.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay (2), 1902 February 17

  • Box 36, Folder 66 - 67
Telegram suggests that Charles is to be retired. Ria’s elation is obvious.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 18

  • Box 36, Folder 68
Sends Clay a list of the china he might purchase but cautions him not to spend beyond his means.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 19

  • Box 36, Folder 69
Received his letter while waiting in Averill’s store [Averill’s Drug Store on West Main Street in Frankfort] to see the matinee Fra Diavolo. [probably the opera by that name] Charles was mortified about the taxes but Ria had taken care of it. Early in their marriage Ria frequently paid bills for Charles usually out of her funds. He was always mortified. Letter alludes to his effort to get a medical retirement. Ria says she has quite a welcome prepared for him.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 22

  • Box 36, Folder 69A
Some financial information; also writes that Tom, Pinnie, Sissie, and May had gone to a matinee performance of an opera. She tells Charles that Col. James E. Pepper had burned to death in the New York Park Avenue Hotel fire. (Ria was mistaken. Pepper escaped the fire.) A note by Elizabeth Clay Blanford says Pepper was a cousin of Mrs. Elizabeth Pepper.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 23

  • Box 36, Folder 70
Ria writes of Tom Smith’s efforts to transfer. She heard a sermon by Dr Roberts, President of Centre College. Visited the Scotts. Tells Charles she had been wrong about the death of Col. James E. Pepper. Frank Chinn visited.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 February 26

  • Box 36, Folder 71
Ria is worried about a cyclone that hit San Francisco. Gently chastises him for not informing her of his safety. Mentions Tom Smith and a transfer he is seeking.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 March 1

  • Box 36, Folder 72
Ria assures him that Susan and Charley are not forgetting him. All are preparing for his return.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 March 3

  • Box 36, Folder 73
Short letter. She had been to church then to visit Mary Nash Averill. Mentions several names but illegible. Bud is Charley Jr. Sissie may be Ria’s sister or daughter Susan.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 March 4

  • Box 36, Folder 74
She describes the delight of Susan and Bud (Charles) at receiving letters from their father. She has talked to Teetee on the telephone and received a letter from her. Mother (Mrs. Susan M. Clay) is suffering bad health. Referring to a letter from Teetee she mentions Governor Beckham’s refusal to represent Kentucky commercially and socially at the South Carolina Exposition. She says Teetee is incensed. Notes visit of Lena and Mr. Hatchett. Notes in ink are in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 March 10

  • Box 36, Folder 75
Ria expects Charles to be on his way home but writes just in case he was delayed. Recounts the difficulty of Tom Smith. Dr. Hume is trying to help him with a transfer but Smith’s father has written a harsh letter threatening to disinherit him if he resigns.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 July 2

  • Box 36, Folder 76
Ria is terrified by the accounts of the battle at El Caney and not knowing her husband’s fate. God help a poor half demented wife who adores her dear Husband. Letter includes news of home. Mentions Mrs Jimmy Kinkead and Miss Mary Harrison. Mary Jackson, Susan’s caretaker, is ill.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 December 4

  • Box 36, Folder 77
General letter telling about children. She continually mentions their father to them. Also mentions Christine (Reynolds) who asked her to give Charles her love.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1902 December 16

  • Box 36, Folder 78
Letter expresses her homesickness and appreciation for his letters. Describes a trip to town to pay bills. Mentions Tom’s (probably Tom Smith) efforts to find employment with Mason Ford And Company.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1906 February 12

  • Box 36, Folder 80
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay Telegram, 1923 March 7

  • Box 36, Folder 81
Instructs him on the people he needs to talk to at Fort Snelling about Charley’s death.
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Charles D. Clay, Jr., 1913-1917

  • Box 37

Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay Jr., 1913

  • Box 37, Folder 1
Charley is on coming home from the Episcopal high school he attended in Virginia to prepare for the West Point exams. Mrs. Clay gives him instructions
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles (Bud) D. Clay Jr., 1913 October 6

  • Box 37, Folder 2
includes letter to Charley dated October 10 and one written by Charles D. Clay to Charley on October 11. Chastising Charley for not writing. Indication of Charles D. Clay Sr.’s parenting; mentions Blackford the headmaster at Shadmann’s. She warns Charley about his health. October 10 letter says she received a letter from Blackford that noted the older boys were hazing Charley and it annoyed him. She reminded him that older boys were in charge and he would be one of them in a year. First page of father’s letter encourages him in regard to the hazing; reminds him that he has a tendency to fight the battles of others. Letters are stapled together. Tells Charley that Grandmother Pepper sold 500 acres and leased 700 acres to Mr. G. H. Taylor. Gives prices of land and rent. Lizzie Pepper trying to buy a farm. Mentions Irma Labrot and Noble Lindsay (old Frankfort names) Tells her son to be courteous and polite, Obey God.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay Jr., 1913 October 13

  • Box 37, Folder 4
She relates a comment by Mr. Blackford, the principal, that Charley has the highest ideals of any boy he had ever known. He says that if he can come out untarnished and gain popularity, he can do much for the school. Mother gives him a strong lesson in moral behavior.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay, Jr., 1913 October 10, 11, 20

  • Box 37, Folder 5
includes letter to Charley dated October 10 and one written by Charles D. Clay to Charley on October 11. Chastising Charley for not writing. Indication of Charles D. Clay Sr.’s parenting; mentions Blackford the headmaster at Shadmann’s. She warns Charley about his health. October 10 letter says she received a letter from Blackford that noted the older boys were hazing Charley and it annoyed him. She reminded him that older boys were in charge and he would be one of them in a year. First page of father’s letter encourages him in regard to the hazing; reminds him that he has a tendency to fight the battles of others. Letters are stapled together.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Charles D. Clay Jr., 1917 November 19

  • Box 37, Folder 3
Includes newspaper clipping. Charles at Columbian Preparatory School in Washington D.C. Mrs. Clay living in Louisville. Preaches her son a sermon after he had complained about difficulty of lessons. Quotes Secretary of the Navy Daniels that there should be a single moral standard for women and men. Includes newspaper article on Daniels’ remarks.
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Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896-1897

  • Box 37

Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896 February 17

  • Box 37, Folder 6
Ria writes to note a sympathy letter from Lucretia on the death of Robert P. Pepper Jr. She notes that Rob had seen Teeter’s brother (probably Tom who was stationed at the fair) at the World’s Fair in Chicago.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896 August 15

  • Box 37, Folder 7
Thanks Teetee for a letter and for proclaiming her a member of the Clay family. Referring to Teetee’s letter of July 30, 1896, she notes the relationship to Henry Clay. Notes failure to establish a chapter of the DAR in Frankfort. Mentions a Mrs Buckner and Mrs. Barrett, but suggests that Teetee might take her (Ria) into the Lexington Chapter some day. Teetee had mentioned her wheat crop so Ria mentions hers. Also mentions efforts to become a housekeeper. Asks Teetee to spend part of the winter with her and help her keep house. She expressed disappointment that Teetee and Mrs. Clay had not visited Margaret Johnson. She had wanted to bring them to the Cliffs to meet her mother and sisters. Letter is perhaps a fitting response to Teetee’s letter.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay (2), 1896 August 18

  • Box 37, Folder 8-9
Ria implies that Charles had been most concerned about a list of relatives he wanted invitations sent to. Letter suggests he was far more concerned with protocol of wedding than he had earlier said. The date of the wedding is now September 8.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896 August 25

  • Box 37, Folder 10
Ria tells Teetee she is sending invitations to the people Teetee h ad suggested. She asks for the address of Richard T. Jacob (Mrs. Clay’s brother). She asks Teetee to thank George for his saucy letter and makes a humorous response concerning the other brother (Tom). (George often made fun of the military airs of his brothers, particularly Charles)
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896 August 31

  • Box 37, Folder 11
Just over a week from the wedding, Ria writes a note to her future sister-in-law. She has enjoyed being with Charley and hopes he felt the same. Says everyone praises Mrs. Clay and Teetee.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1896 November 15

  • Box 37, Folder 12
Ria relates the story of Mike’s rescue and her injury. She also describes her home. She then mentions the elections and makes some political judgements. She wanted to congratulate Tom on the elections but urges Teetee to tell George that she is afraid of free silver men. They have been tearing down toll gates near us. They also burned the toll house. She mentions Jim and Eliza, George and Tom.
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Maria Hensley Pepper Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1897 March 22

  • Box 37, Folder 13
Letter urging Teetee and Mrs. Clay to come for a visit. Mentions a Mr. Milward of Lexington. Clays had purchased a sideboard but it had not arrived. Milward would try to find it.
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Robert P. Clay, 1923-1927

  • Box 37

Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, undated

  • Box 37, Folder 14
She chides Bob for not writing. She mentions marriage of Edith Berryman and Baylor VanMeter. She says Susan is running around in search of pleasure and finding but little, Metzie crazy about botany…
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1923 December 5

  • Box 37, Folder 15
Accompanying note Mrs. Elizabeth Blanford to Lindsey Apple March 26, 1988. Anticipating Christmas. Notes that Governor (William) Fields is threatening to stop a naval cadet dance at the Capital Hotel because he doesn’t believe in dancing and card playing. Also mentions Susan’s first meeting with the Scribblers’ Club, a literary group in Lexington. Miss Hearns is probably a Christian Science practitioner. Metzie is the youngest sister.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1923 December 10

  • Box 37, Folder 16
She is elated that he will soon be home for Christmas. She attributes his improved grades to Christian Science treatment. She mentions local people such as Ben Goodwin and Mr. Smith. She wants to know if she should invite Anne to Christmas dinner.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, circa 1923-1924

  • Box 37, Folder 17
She expresses her exasperation with Susan who went on a walk with Ralph Fletcher Seymour, a visiting artists, and caught a cold. Elizabeth had visited Anne
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 February 26

  • Box 37, Folder 18
Tells Bob about visiting Hood Harney who has had a relapse and a second operation. Mentions Ann, the girl Bob likes.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924

  • Box 37, Folder 19
(internally dated 1924) Mrs. Clay writes about the tobacco crop and Col. Clay’s ability to pay two notes. Col. Clay has talked to Dean Anderson. Other letters show Bob hoped he could get him a job when he graduated from the academy. Mrs. Clay shows her fear of all Bob’s plans. She tells Bob that the engagement of _____ Polsgrove has been announced in the Lexington Leader.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924

  • Box 37, Folder 20
Metzie is going to a concert with Mrs. Peter and Virginia. The letter is rather pessimistic. Col. Clay has gotten Mr. Eaves to raise the tobacco and Mr. Berryman to get horses for him to keep. Tom and George Clay have sold Henry Clay’s correspondence to the Library of Congress but they won’t tell Colonel Clay what they got for it. They are undecided about their future (Teetee died the year before.) She expresses concern over finances.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924

  • Box 37, Folder 21
Talks about going to see Mammy, who is nearly 100 years old, and bringing her apples and marmalade. Says the puppies are all gone except for one female. Due to descriptions of glowing tree colors, it's likely fall. Talks about she and her husband registering their votes for Coolidge.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 January 1

  • Box 37, Folder 22
She is worried that he and Cureton have reached West Point. She helped Metz catch the train to Louise Falconer’s party and mentioned that John Davis and Boyd Bailey had been out to call on Susan. They mention a (Florence) Brown, a seventeen year old girl from Lexington. She has kept the family pets inside because of the cold weather.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 January 28

  • Box 37, Folder 23
She expresses concern over the cold weather at West Point. She mentions Miss Helen, her Christian Science practitioner and the fact that Susan and Virginia Goodwin are going to a film. Her father has chickens and is very proud of how many eggs he is getting.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 February 6

  • Box 37, Folder 24
The family is delighted with a letter Bob wrote. Anne has been very nice to Elizabeth at the University. She recounts an attempt to see Professor Sax (Sax was in the University Art Department.)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 February 9

  • Box 37, Folder 25
After the death of her son Charley Mrs. Clay explains that she went to school to try to prepare herself to take care of the family if Col. Clay died. She also related a story told by Mrs. Harney, the mother of their boyhood friend Hood Harney. The story emphasized Charley’s sense of honor. The note in blue ink is that of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, circa 1924 March-April

  • Box 37, Folder 26
(internally dated 1924. See Robert to Mrs Clay March 4, 1924). Mrs. Clay mentions going to work at State College. She informs Bob that Mamma (Mrs. Pepper) is very ill. Hood Harney is not doing well either—two surgeries. She saw Anne in Lexington.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 March 1

  • Box 37, Folder 27
Bob has been in the hospital with a bad foot. Mrs. Clay implores him to keep nothing from her because she worries so much. Mrs. Pepper is ill. Col. Clay has a problem with a finger. She mentions Hood Harney’s illness.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 March 6

  • Box 37, Folder 28
She is anxious because she has not heard from him. She mentions minor family news and the Colonel’s efforts to find someone to raise his tobacco. She notes that Hood (Harney) is getting better. (He was a childhood friend of Bob and Charley.)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 April 2

  • Box 37, Folder 29
Ria is upset because Dr. Bullock suggests Susan will need an operation. She is hoping for improvement through Christian Science and mentions her practitioner named Helen. She also expresses concern over the health of Mrs. Pepper (granny)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 April 17

  • Box 37, Folder 30
She expresses delight at his standing in Philosophy then takes a biblical approach in urging him to apply himself. Notes a possible visit by Metzie in the summer.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 April 20

  • Box 37, Folder 31
At Easter she describes preparing flowers for Charley’s grave. She mentions that Mr. (Granville) Terrell had been out to dinner. (He was a literary friend of Susan’s). She describes the health problems of her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Pepper and the rental of a wheel chair for her. Encourages him in his school work.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 April 27, 30

  • Box 37, Folder 32
in one envelope. Mrs. Clay is terribly worried about him because he has not written. (Always anxious, Charley’s death had increased her concerns for her children.) She wants Metzie (Elizabeth) to visit Lyne Smith and then all of them see Bob at West Point. She says they do not have the money to send Elizabeth for a visit to West Point. She also mentions that Anne may go to West Point and stay with the Chaplain. Mrs. Clay hopes Mr. Berryman will find horses during the races because he boards them at the Clay farm. Promises letters from Metzie and Susan. April 30 She is worried that she has not heard from him. She sends two clippings from the Lexington Herald but they are not in the letter. She mentions the lack of money in relation to Susan and to the trip to West Point planned for Elizabeth. She hopes to get a job at Bogaerts (a Lexington store) that Louise Falconer’s mother had but is giving up for a trip with Louise to Europe. She expresses anxiety about being a business woman.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 May 15

  • Box 37, Folder 33
She thanks Bob for his Mother’s Day letter and the copies of the Cadet’s Prayer. Col Clay will give one of them to Bishop Burton. She cautions Bob about taking risks while playing polo then mentions the job she hopes to get at Bogaerts. She mentions that Louise Falconer is going on a trip before sailing with her mother for a y ear abroad. She is delighted that Bob has asked Louisa Hoge for a weekend. She clearly states that she hopes it diminishes his fondness for Anne who she says is queerer than Dicks hat band ever dared to be. She expresses doubt that Elizabeth can visit him unless they get horses to board at the farm.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 June 2

  • Box 37, Folder 34
She tells Robert that Susan is going to Memphis with Louisianna von Engleton, Dunster Foster and Ida Moore (Foster and Moore had attended Miss Ella Williams School with Susan) they were attending a Confederate Reunion as representatives of Lexington. She tells him about a meeting of the Bryan Station chapter of the D.A. R. to discuss a pageant to be held at Harrodsburg. Writing from the Phoenix in Lexington she mentions appearance of Billy Breckinridge who she says is putting on airs and flirting with Dunster Foster because he has passed the West Point exams. She is not entirely complementary. She encourages Bob to invite Dunster Foster to West Point. (In an interview Dunster Foster Petit said she did like Bob a lot but she married and her son, Foster Petit, was later mayor of Lexington.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 June 18

  • Box 37, Folder 35
She expresses her concern over his flying. She despises the army because of its dangers. She then turns to a pageant held at Harrodsburg and the participation of Susan and Metzie. The girls were in an episode depicting the heroic effort of the women of Bryan’s Station. She also mentions Susan’s trip to Memphis. Colonel “Dick” Redd suggested her as a representative of the John C. Breckinridge camp. Susan attracted an admirer, Tom Collier, but found out he has been insane. She mentions Dunster Foster then Billy Breckinridge and hopes Bob will help him at the point if he behaves himself. She encourages Bob to be a christian, honorable, clean, sober gentleman.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 June 19

  • Box 37, Folder 36
Mrs. Clay is very worried about the pageant in Harrodsburg. She worries about the ferry ride across the Kentucky River and the shooting of blank cartridges and arrows in the pageant itself. She worries about a drove of cattle and a drove of sheep. She doubts they will get to West Point. There has been no word from Mr. Berryman (about horses to board) and Mr. Eaves is trying to back out of raising the tobacco.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 November 21

  • Box 37, Folder 37
She mentions that their puppies have been killing the chickens so they are looking for new homes for them. She keeps Bob informed about Uncle George and his horses. She mentions the Colonel’s corn crop and a problem with the tobacco pool. She calls them high handed and criticizes the salaries of J____ Stone and Hensley Shouse.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924 December 13

  • Box 37, Folder 38
Mrs. Clay expresses wish that there was a school like West Point for women. Susan and Metzie could use the discipline and character building. Society is drifting in an immoral direction. She says Susan has published her poems which are dark, dreary, desperate and somewhat sacrilegious. She has imbibed such though from her limited and not choice circle of friends. Mentions Bettie Barbour, Louisa Hoge and Dunster Foster. Col. Clay wrote a short note at the end of the letter.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1924

  • Box 37, Folder 39
(Contents indicate the West Point years—probably 1924)Mrs. Clay is very concerned about his report and puts a lot of pressure on Bob not to disappoint his father and the family. Mentions marriage of Will Talbert to Miss Rose Mason. Hood Harney is out of the hospital and staying at the Lafayette Hotel.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1925 February 1

  • Box 37, Folder 40
Coming from Church she and Susan stopped at the Phoenix Hotel. Susan is going to visit Elizabeth Simpson. They are sending Bob a birthday present—a cigarette holder, not to encourage the habit but for a pretty finish to an occasional smoke. She mentions that Mr Terrell (Granville) would come to dinner. Metzie was demoralized and nervous over examinations but did well. Susan is going to Chicago but Ria does not know what may be the outcome of her disordered ideas…. She and Susan are having lunch at McGurks. Elizabeth and Col. Clay are going to George Clay’s for dinner.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1925 February 7

  • Box 37, Folder 41
Anne has gotten married and Ria is happy that Bob is taking it well and she is happy that Anne is married to someone other than Bob. She mentions Col. Clay’s efforts to pay off the bills and speaks of their financial situation. She also mentions that Dr. McFarland of the University has chosen Elizabeth as a student assistant in botany.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1925 February 19

  • Box 37, Folder 42
She urges him not to try out for track again because it affects his health and his studies adversely. Men in their family are all manly but no athletes. Says the hearts in the Clay family are unconventional to say the least. The Colonel says to give up track.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1925 March 16

  • Box 37, Folder 43
She mentions sewing for the girls and Col Clay’s efforts to get barns to house eighteen or nineteen acres of tobacco he is planning. She tells him she has seen the films The Ten Commandments and the Thundering Herd. She is fascinated by film making. She describes guests of Metzie—Janet Metcalf and Virginia Goodwin, and a little farm boy (name indecipherable). She describes trying to write a limerick to win a prize from a magazine. She suggests that the father of Virginia Goodwin is going mad.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1925 April 24

  • Box 37, Folder 44
(1925 internally dated) See Col. Clay to Robert October 20, 1924. Upset that she did not receive her usual letter, she writes that the Col. is enthralled with a lawn mower he purchased and with the help of a African American named Charley Davis he is raking and cutting grass. Mr. Berryman has no news about horses (to board).
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Robert P. Clay, 1927 April 4

  • Box 37, Folder 45
She tells him he means so much to her then talks about working in her garden with George (may be her brother-in-law or a servant). Susan has gone to the Romany theater with Elizabeth Murphey (Simpson)
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Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1920-1938

  • Box 37

Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, undated

  • Box 37, Folder 46
Fragment of a letter. Warns Susan about going to movies too often. Mentions: Mrs. (Leslie) Carter, an actress; Miss Stone; several servants; Miss Virginia, the children’s tutor; Lena and Clay Hatchell, Ria’s half sister; Willie Kinkead---Susan is staying with her Aunt May and her husband at Fort McPherson ink portion is in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1920 January 11

  • Box 37, Folder 47
Susan visiting Aunt Pinnie (Mrs. Tom Smith) in Washington D. C. Took course in stenography and got a job—hoping to escape the suffocating atmosphere of family and community as she saw it. Sissie, another of Ria’s sister’s had paid for her course. She is trying to pay it back. Mrs. Clay is not altogether happy about Susan living away from home as a single woman. This is one of several letters that seem to confront Susan with guilt about her decision. Part of letter is missing.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1921 July 2

  • Box 37, Folder 48
Mentions Charles Hertz, young man interested in Susan; Bob on way to West Point, stops in Washington to visit Pin (Mrs. Thomas Smith), Ria Clay’s sister. Lizzie is another Pepper sister and Metzie is Elizabeth Clay (Blanford), Susan’s sister. Mrs. Sandifer, a Christian Science practitioner.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1921 July 12

  • Box 37, Folder 49
Susan went to New York in 1921 to try to publish her poetry. A Lexington friend Helen Lowry introduced her to people---a Mr. Cesare ,Alfred Kreymborgh. Mother’s letter is portrait of southern traditionalism.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, approximately 1921-1922

  • Box 37, Folder 50
fragment. Letter notes Susan’s resignation as a writer with the Louisville Herald. She worked there in 1921-22. Mother mentions encouragement from Edna Ferber. Susan had interviewed Ferber when the writer was in Louisville. It also mentions acceptance of a piece Susan had written by Alfred Krembough. There are other references to these events in the papers. Letter offers encouragement through Christian Science.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1933 October 29

  • Box 37, Folder 51
Elizabeth (Metzie) is helping Mr. Smith run for sheriff in Fayette County. Mrs. Smith is Cleo Dawson Smith who taught Spanish at the University. Mentions relatives of her mother, the Starlings and various cousins.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1933 December 18

  • Box 37, Folder 52
Sending Christmas gift.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 March 15

  • Box 37, Folder 53
Christian Science; Miss Lounsbury, practitioner; Dommie, the Sawitzky’s car; omnibus—transportation that passed in front of Clay home; Peter Ross
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 May 10

  • Box 37, Folder 54
Note about planting a garden; note by Elizabeth Clay Blanford identifying Will.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 July 21

  • Box 37, Folder 55
Postcard. Storm in Lexington
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 August 11

  • Box 37, Folder 56
Bob, Mary Martha and Lucy visiting in Lexington; Paris, Illinois; Sissie and Lizzie are Mariah Clay’s sisters, Lollie Starling is a cousin; gifs of Tom to Bob—Healy portrait of Henry Clay; James B. Clay portrait. Future division of Tom Clay’s estate.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1934 September 2

  • Box 37, Folder 57
Recounts trip to Bardstown with a Mr. Crum; says they ate at Beaumont Inn. (She may meant the Talbott Tavern. Beaumont Inn is closer to Harrodsburg) Mentions a car accident on the way back to Lexington. Sissie and Pinnie are Mrs. Clay’s sisters. Tootie is a niece (Mrs. Ben Kennedy of Frankfort); King’s Daughters Hospital is in Frankfort. Mentions Dr. Coleman, Mayor of Frankfort. Bob is probably Bob Smith; Robert Clay had visited in August but left early (See Susan Clay Sawitzky to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, August 19, 1934.) Tom Clay’s heart condition.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1935 November 4

  • Box 37, Folder 58
Millie Lawson, longtime African American servant; Mrs. Sandifer, Christian Science practitioner; Tom Clay’s financial help; Tom Clay’s health; Pinnie Smith’s health; Mr Bosworth, a neighbor;
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1935 November 19

  • Box 37, Folder 59
African-Americans in the depression; psychological impact of depression.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1935 December 19

  • Box 37, Folder 60
Mrs. Clay lonely after death of husband and worried about Susan. Plans to send money to help fix Vassili’s teeth.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1935 December 28

  • Box 37, Folder 61
Mrs. Clay is delighted that Vassili has found a patron though the benefactor wishes to remain anonymous. Much of the letter deals with illness and the efforts to resolve through Christian Science practitioners. She also describes her husband’s death and her happiness t hat he did not suffer.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 January 5

  • Box 37, Folder 62
Blizzard in Lexington; Millie Lawson quilting; names friends of Susan and Vassili;encourages Susan to send laundry home;Mrs. Buffum, a Science practitioner; Lonesomeness after death of Colonel Clay; Vassili’s health; will Middleton was an African-American laborer on the Clay farm; Millie Lawson cooked and cleaned; Bob sends Millie extra money; Depression wages. Frank Fowler associated with University; he attempted to get a negro dialect play written by Elizabeth published in New York; Mary Averill; Note of sympathy from War Department about death of Col Clay; Elizabeth Clay Blanford not in blue ink about importance of Millie and Will to family.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 February 11

  • Box 37, Folder 63
Metz or Metzie is the nickname for Elizabeth; Millie Lawson; Tom Clay; Lafayette Hotel; Elizabeth Murphy (Simpson)
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 March 4

  • Box 37, Folder 64
Mrs. Sandifer; Mrs. Williams is probably their landlord, Mrs. Augusta Williams. Miss Sammis, a neighbor; Mrs. Weed, a neighbor; Selling home; will Middleton, African-American laborer; Millie Lawson; Sawitzky having problems with teeth
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 March 14

  • Box 37, Folder 65
Financial problems of Mrs. Clay;; slowness of the army to send money; help of Uncle tom. Death of Darwin Johnson (brother-in-law of Susan M. Clay); Katie was sister or half-sister of Susan M. Clay; Mrs. Sandifer; Tom Clay; Lizzie Pepper, Mrs. Clay’s sister.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 April 5

  • Box 37, Folder 66
Mrs. Clay and Elizabeth have Saturday lunches with Tom Clay; Tom Clay helping her financially; discussion of taking a boarder; lowering sale price of home; Pin is Pinnie Smith, Mrs. Clay’s sister and Tootie is Pin’s daughter; Lizzie Pepper is Mrs. Clay’s sister; pension check not arriving.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 May 12

  • Box 37, Folder 67
Mama (Mrs. Elizabeth Pepper, Mariah’s mother) Mrs. Weed (Susan’s neighbor) Mrs. Augusta Williams (Susan’s landlord); Bob Clay and Will Middleton - relations with African American servants; Tom helping Mrs. Clay financially; Sale of property stalled.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 June 25

  • Box 37, Folder 68
Bob in town trying to sell house; difficulties of selling; Sissie (Mrs. Clay’s sister) Bob Smith; medical news
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 August 11

  • Box 37, Folder 69
Sale of property; Mr. Waltz and Mr. Pettit are neighbors. Mrs. Wright may be the wife of the owner of Calumet Farm. Describes a film called Green Pastures — African-American issues; religious issues;
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1936 August 31

  • Box 37, Folder 70
Jimmie Cogar; Mrs. Funkhauser, husband at the University; Joe Wise; Senator Joe Blackburn; Katie Johnson, a relative; Margaret Nash, a relative from Frankfort; Waltz family; Petit family.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1937 March 31

  • Box 37, Folder 71
Writing on envelope—grocery list; etc; Mrs. Sandifer, practitioner; Metz (sister), Janette McDonald; Nelson Eddy; May Time.
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1937 August 16

  • Box 37, Folder 72
Susan at Cragsmere; shopping list on envelope; Pinn is sister Pinnie Smith; Bendalari-purchased Clay home; investment of money from estate sale; Reynolds Tobacco; General Motors; Bob (brother); Metz (sister); William Powell, Franchet Tone; Jene Harlow
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1938 January 8

  • Box 37, Folder 73
Elizabeth taking over finances;Effie Young; Margaret Nash (relative); Rose Crittenden; St. James Court (Louisville); Tom Clay health; Millie Lawson, African American servant; Healy portrait (of Henry Clay); Mrs. Buckley ( a Christian Science friend); Cleo (Dawson smith); Henrietta Clay (relative).
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Mrs. Charles D. Clay to Susan Clay Sawitzky, 1938 April 14

  • Box 37, Folder 74
Susan ill; Christian Science; Pin (Mrs. Tom Smith ) Tootie, Pinnie’s daughter.
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To Mariah Pepper Clay (Mrs. Charles D. Clay), 1895-1936

  • Box 38, 45

Mattie Norton to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 1
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May Pepper Godehue to Ria Clay, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 2
May was Ria Clay’s sister. Married a German soldier who served in the 17th Infantry with Charles Clay.
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Christine Reynolds to Maria Pepper Clay, 1895 September 9

  • Box 38, Folder 3
Ria wrote to Christine about a plight—a decision she had to make. Apparently she was unclear because Christine writes back asking for an explanation. She knows it is a matter of the heart. She mentions Thomas Averill’s engagement to Mary Nash and the attraction of someone to Ria’s sister Lizzie. She also mentions several men who apparently had interests in Ria—a Mr. Cameron and Robert Trabue. Note is in hand of Elizabeth Blanford.
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Christine Reynolds to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 December 8

  • Box 38, Folder 4
Christine writes about local news and people Ria would knew. She and Lizzie Pepper were developing pictures Lizzie took of Mr. (Robert Burns) Wilson and some of his paintings. She mentions Mamie Scott, Mrs. James Murray, Louise and May, Vest LaBrot, Elizabeth Henderson.
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Pinnie Pepper Smith to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 December 14

  • Box 45, Folder 7
Pinnie describes the bazaar and mentions a number of names but her handwriting makes it difficult to read them with any degree of accuracy. She mentions Vew Labrot, Ruth Elys, Mr. Graham, Dudley Lindsay, Mr. Franklin, Ed Stanton, Bettie Mastin, and Christine (Reynolds).
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Lyne Pepper to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 December 19

  • Box 38, Folder 5
A cousin of Ria, Pepper writes that Robert Burns Wilson is auctioning some of his paintings. Liz (probably Lissie Pepper) and a friend (It may be a LaBrot). Mentions a Dick Van der Veer
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Christine Reynolds to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1896 December 21

  • Box 38, Folder 6
A chatty letter about Frankfort and the activities there—a church bazaar, etc. Christine had been engaged to Robert Pepper Jr before his untimely death.
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James R. Ely, M.D. to Mrs Charles D. Clay, 1898 July 1

  • Box 38, Folder 7
Ely sends a bill for surgery performed on Susan. $15
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Pinnie Pepper to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1898 December 23

  • Box 45, Folder 9
Thanks for wedding gift and news of the wedding Mentions that Teetee plans to attend the wedding. Also talks about Christmas
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Pinnie Smith to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 February 9

  • Box 45, Folder 11
Fragment. Pinnie writes of her impending voyage for the Philippines. Mentions sisters May and Lena. Begins to tell a story about the black servants when page ends but there is no second page. Blue ink in hand of Elizabeth Clay Blanford. Contents of letter support her contention t hat the letter is from Pinnie.
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Pinnie Smith to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 April 16

  • Box 45, Folder 12
Philippine Insurrection. Pinnie arrived in Manila and pronounced Charles looking well. Mentions a number of people who probably had Central Kentucky connections. Mrs. Duncan is probably the wife of a military officer who later helped Charles when Charley Jr. died in the service. She also mentions the Hart children, Mrs. Reeves, Mrs. Hardaway as if Ria would know them.
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John L. Kirk to Mrs. Charles Clay, 1899 May 9

  • Box 38, Folder 8
Philippine Insurrection. Letter contained two enclosures—a newspaper clipping that is no longer attached and a copy of a letter from John C Gregg to Mrs. John L. Kirk March 28, 1890 The letter describes a battle in which Gregg participated. The letter gives an account of the wound Charles Clay received at Ban Lac.
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Lena Hatchett to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 June 28

  • Box 38, Folder 9
Ria’s half sister, Lena writes to thank her for a gift. Letter includes general social news and relays praise of Susan to Ria.
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Eliza (Mrs. James B. Jr) Clay to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1899 July 21

  • Box 38, Folder 10
Writes immediately after Charles’s surgery to comfort Ria. Her husband Jim and Tom Clay were there and saw him shortly after the surgery. She mentions Linda Payne Kerr, a family friend, who was at the hospital. She mentions a forthcoming visit in Frankfort of herself, Teetee and Mrs. Clay to Margaret Johnson. She writes that the Clays are forgetful as if Ria would surely know it.
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One of Ria Clay’s sisters to Ria Clay, 1900 August 15

  • Box 38, Folder 11
The family is still at Irvine but this sister is getting tired of it. Refers to Mrs. Clay as dear old Ria so probably one of the younger sisters. She wants to visit Ria in Nashville but then describes a play presented by the people staying at Estill Springs that she enjoyed very much. Mentions Shackelford, Burn(h)am, Stedmann, Lollie, etc.
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Pinnie Smith to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1900 October 1

  • Box 45, Folder 16
Pinnie writes about her impending return to the Philippines. She mentions the trial of the alleged Goebel assassins and hopes for a pardon of Howard from the death penalty. The letter contains other Frankfort social news. She mentions Lizzie Chinn, Buck Johnson, Ester Burnham, her sister Sissie.
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Mrs. Clay Hatchett to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, approximately 1905 July 28

  • Box 38, Folder 12
Charles and Ria built their home in 1904 and the children could still be called babies. Mrs. Hatchett was Mariah Pepper Clay’s half-sister. Lived in Scott County.
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Mary Nash to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1908 June 10

  • Box 38, Folder 13
Letter after Ria’s surgery; describes Susan. Mentions Katherine Garrett and Mary Stevenson. Her husband is Thomas. Also mentions Lena, one of Ria’s sisters. Letter paper clipped to one from Charles Clay to Mrs. Charles clay June 17, 1908. The Nash family lived across the street from Mrs. Pepper and may have been related.
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L.M. Blackford, Jr. to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1913 December 9

  • Box 38, Folder 14
Charley (Bud) was a student at Episcopal High School studying to enter West Point. He got in fights with bigger boys over questions of honor. Interesting account of child psychology of the time. Within family Charley was known for his intense sense of honor.
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Pinnie Smith to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1920 December 11

  • Box 45, Folder 24
Pinnie trying to convince Ria to send Bob back to complete work at Shadmann’s. Both Charley and Bob attended Shadmann’s school. It was known for preparing young men for the military academies. Fearing financial problems at home he wants to drop out and finish his work at a Mrs. Kavanaugh’s in Kentucky. Letter suggests that Pinnie is a surrogate mother for Bob in Washington. Praises Bob’s character and says Mr. Shadmann does as well.
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Lucy Martindale to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1928 February 20

  • Box 38, Folder 15
Letter dated from contents. Mother of Mary Martha thanking Mrs. Clay for their visit and asking for list of people she wants sent announcements of wedding. Praises Bob Clay; describes gypsy life of army people; sorry Clays had not been able to attend the wedding.
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Alice Mengel (Vassili’s sister) to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1930 July 7

  • Box 38, Folder 16
Her son Paul had visited the Clays; he attended Berea College; depression
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Mrs. J.N. Allison to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1932 June 20

  • Box 38, Folder 17
Thank you note after a visit.
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Tom Smith to Mrs. Charles D. Clay, 1936 December 23

  • Box 38, Folder 18
Baby was a Clay pet.
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George H. Clay, 1879-1908

  • Box 38
The George H. Clay series consists of letters written by George H. Clay to various family members. The bulk of the series consists of letters written to his brother, Charles D. Clay, concerning business ventures, agriculture, and family news.

Single letters, 1880-1897

  • Box 38

George H. Clay to unknown, approximately 1880 May 7

  • Box 38, Folder 19
George asks someone to look in the deed box to find plot of property. He draws a map for them. On reverse side is part of note to Thomas P. Jacob on stationery of R. H. Crittenden U.S. Marshall for Louisville dated May 7, 1880 regarding need of funds for Marshall’s office.
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George H. Clay to Harry Clay, 1881 February 10

  • Box 38, Folder 20
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George H. Clay to Ria Clay, 1897 August 9

  • Box 38, Folder 21
George writes to Ria after Susan’s birth. Thanks her for naming baby after his mother. Pokes fun at Charley and his brass buttons. Says he has little advice on child rearing because he is a miserable old bachelor but he does anyway.
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Charles D. Clay, 1879-1908

  • Box 38

George H. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1879 December 20

  • Box 38, Folder 22
Exchange of property between the two. (Basil) Duke was the lawyer in the transfer. The signature on the letter looks like C.M. Clay but it is signed your affectionate brother. There is no brother with the middle initial M. Aunt Mary may be a member of the Jacob family or it could be Mary Mentelle Clay, the widow of Thomas Hart Clay. The Clays had property in Louisville, but most of it was tied up in a trust.
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George H. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1899 March 24

  • Box 38, Folder 23
Letter has to be from George because he mentions that everyone else has written. Gives Charles advice. He understands that it is difficult for Charles to leave so much behind but he is nevertheless being too gloomy. It is, after all, the profession he chose. Should also be some pleasure in doing his duty. George opposes expansionism. Writes about his horses and predicts they will have 9 foals. Last portion of letter is missing.
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George H. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1900 July 19

  • Box 38, Folder 24
George writes about Charles’ wheat crop, the price it might bring, and the expense of harvesting. He mentions their two brothers, Jimmy and Tom. He also mentions two of the African Americans who work at Balgowan Henry and old Daniel (Uncle Daniel). Weather was hot and dry so he carried water from Jim’s pump. Mentions sail of three horses.
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George H. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1906 October 11

  • Box 38, Folder 25
Sewing bluegrass seed for Charles but wants check to pay for it. Mr. Waltz will sow seed. Concerns about little Charley’s health
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George H. Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1908 May 19

  • Box 38, Folder 26
Describing condition of Charles’s mares. Letter contains a lot of information on horses—breeding and racing and the financial side of it. George also asks for direction relative to Charles’s farm. Mentions Tom Clay’s heart problems and Teetee’s bad health.
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Harry Independence Clay, 1870-1889

  • Box 44
  • Box 65
  • Box 63
  • Box 27, 32
  • Box 38-39
The Harry Independence Clay series consists of letters, notes, printed materials, diaries, receipts, and newspaper clippings documenting Harry Clay's expedition to the Arctic, political career, and family relationships. The bulk of the collection consists of his voluminous notes on the Arctic, Greenland, and the Eskimo people. Additionally, there are speech notes; several diaries, including his diary kept on Howgate's Expedition (Box 65, Folder 5); and newspaper clippings, concerning the expedition and his death in a barroom brawl. Harry Clay wrote several letters Clay to his family, including his mother Susan Clay, his brother Charles D. Clay, and his sister Lucretia Teetee Clay. In one letter to Lucretia, Harry describes the current politics of Greenland (Box 38, Folder 47). The series contains many letters written to and from Harry Clay from people such as Henry Howgate, J.C.S. Blackburn, W.B. Hazen, Basil Duke, and Augustus Greely. These letters reflect Harry Clay's involvement in politics, his law practice, and his efforts to rescue the Greely Expedition, efforts which were ultimately rejected. Notable letters include those from Henry Howgate concerning his involvement in the Howgate Expedition to Greenland and the Arctic, such as the original letter inviting Harry Clay to join the expedition (Box 44, Folder 69).

General, 1870-1889

  • Box 27, 38, 44, 63, 65

Legal language — conveyance of land, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 27
On back of envelope phrasings suggests conveyance of land to Susan M. Clay. It looks to be the handwriting of Harry Clay. The 154-152 may refer to lot numbers in the Jacob Enlargement — a Louisville development in which James B. Clay and Thomas P. Jacob had interests.
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Empty envelopes (2), undated

  • Box 38, Folder 34 - 35
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Note on Glaciers Harry Clay, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 36
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Protius essay, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 37
Harry Clay describes the Gulnare and the Proteus, the two ships he was involved with on his arctic travel. He also comments on the two crews.
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Harry I. Clay notes while with Greely, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 38
Writes about stalking musk-oxen.
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Newspaper clipping Harry Clay, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 39
Photograph of Harry Clay
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Harry Clay notes for speeches and articles on Greenland, undated

  • Box 65, Folder 1
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Newspaper clippings Greely Expedition, undated

  • Box 65, Folder 3
Charges of cannibalism; information from survivors
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Miscellaneous notes on Greenland, undated

  • Box 27, Folder 6
Portions of the notes are missing but he treats topics as diverse as his relationship to the Eskimo children, Greenland government and social life, seal hunts. He describes some of their travels by sea.
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Henry Howgate newspaper clipping, undated

  • Box 44, Folder 67
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Harry Clay diary, 1870

  • Box 38, Folder 42
A diary Clay kept while on a European tour
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Catalog of the Officers and Students in the Law Department of the University of Louisville, 1871-1872

  • Box 38, Folder 43
Belonged to Harry Independence Clay who was a student there. Practiced his signature, H.Clay, to copy that of his grandfather.
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Harry Clay License to practice before the Supreme Court of California, 1872 July 7

  • Box 38, Folder 32
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Cancelled bank draft Harry Clay, 1872

  • Box 38, Folder 31
Note for $500 at 10% interest. H.Clay is Harry Independence Clay
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Newspaper article Clay and Boland The Louisville Daily Ledger, 1876 July 25

  • Box 65, Folder 6
In 1876 Harry Clay ran successfully against Capt. Boland for Prosecuting Attorney. Charges of running on his family name, but Clay showed aggressiveness that characterized his short political career.
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Thomas C. Lewis to C.E. Henry Howgate, 1880 May 22

  • Box 44, Folder 66
Letter of introduction for Harry Clay.
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G.C. Doane to Inspector Smith, Inspector of North Greenland, 1880 August 8

  • Box 44, Folder 68
The Gulnare put in at Godhaven to make repairs and gather supplies to replace those lost at sea. Doane explains his mission and asks for Smith’s help.
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Harry I. Clay Greenland diaries, circa 1880-1881

  • Box 38, Folder 40
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Harry Clay Arctic expedition and death newspaper clippings, 1880-1884

  • Box 38, Folder 30
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Speech notes on Greenland by Harry Clay, circa 1880-1885

  • Box 65, Folder 4
Mentions his efforts to learn about the safety of the Gulnare and how he was misled. Praises efforts of the Inspector’s family to make him comfortable and notes his enjoyment of the year spent in Greenland. Gives some information on Danish and native cultures
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Doggeral, circa 1880-1889

  • Box 38, Folder 33
A Louisville friend of Harry Clay sent several poems, doggerals, etc. while he was preparing to go on the Arctic Expedition.
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Greenland diary, 1881 January-June

  • Box 65, Folder 5
Tells about Christmas and New Year celebrations. He talks about a servant who shared their brandy with his friends. Keeps temperature readings and writes mostly about the weather; Describes hunting trips; exploration trips. Notes surprise at election of Garfield.
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Account of dispute with Dr. Octave Pairy, 1881 March 8

  • Box 38, Folder 44
Harry Clay recounts the refusal of Dr. Octave Pavy to treat a sick child in Greenland. Clay’s disgust with Pavy later led to his leaving the Greely party.
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Newspaper clippings, Harry Clay’s Arctic travels, 1881 July, November

  • Box 65, Folder 7
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Harry Clay and the Arctic Clipping Courier Journal, 1881

  • Box 38, Folder 45
A long article on Harry’s interaction with the Danes and the Eskimos.
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Harry Clay notes on arctic expedition (copies), 1881

  • Box 65, Folder 9
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Newspaper clipping Sailing of the Gulnare, 1882 June 21

  • Box 38, Folder 28
Harry Clay sailed on the Gulnare to Greenland with Henry Howgate expedition.
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Harry Clay and Arctic Courier Journal, 1882 November 7

  • Box 38, Folder 46
Newspaper clipping about Harry Clay’s lecture on the Greeley and Howgate expeditions.
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Newspaper clipping Harry Clay, circa 1882

  • Box 38, Folder 41
The article is about the Howgate Expedition.
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Newspaper clippings Harry Clay and politics, 1883

  • Box 65, Folder 2
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Newspaper clippings, Greely Expedition, 1883

  • Box 65, Folder 8
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Newspaper clipping Harry Clay legal case, 1883

  • Box 63, Folder 33
On the trial of Philip Hinkle, a city official the Board of Alderman was trying to impeach.
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Harry Clay’s Plan for the Relief of the Greely expedition, 1884 January 22

  • Box 65, Folder 10
Calling on his experience in Greenland and his study of the region Harry Clay presented a plan for the relief of the Greely Expedition. The army refused to use it, but it would have saved many more members of the party. (Original in the Library of Congress.)
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Newspaper clippings, Death of Harry Clay, 1884 September

  • Box 63, Folder 34
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The Clay Shooting Louisville Courier-Journal, 1884 September 22

  • Box 63, Folder 35
Copy of article detailing the shooting of Harry Clay by Andrew Wepler.
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Newspaper clipping about death of Harry Clay, circa 1884

  • Box 38, Folder 29
penciled note credits Louisville Courier Journal. The clipping is an early account of the shooting and death of Harry Clay in Louisville.
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Single letters, 1880-1884

  • Box 32, 38, 63

Harry Clay to mother Susan M. Clay, 1880 May 28

  • Box 32, Folder 14
Charles asked mother to send by bearer of note a bundle of things he wants to take with him (on Arctic Expedition).
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Harry Clay to Susan M. Clay, 1880 June 18

  • Box 38, Folder 50
Harry discusses difficulties of getting the Gulnare certified for the voyage to Greenland. He also gives details of the crew, etc.
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Harry Clay to Lucretia (Teetee) Clay, 1880 July 22

  • Box 38, Folder 51
Harry tells her about an accident aboard the Gulnare, blaming it on the engineer. He still believes in the seaworthiness of the ship. He also describes the land.
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Harry Clay to Lucretia (Teetee) Clay letter fragments, circa 1880

  • Box 38, Folder 52
Letter notes an expedition looking for specimens. He also talks about the land.
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Harry Clay to Lucretia Teetee Clay, 1881 April 1

  • Box 38, Folder 47
Harry writes a long letter telling his sister how well he is faring in Greenland then recounts the history of Greenland. He describes the current governor and the weather.
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Harry Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1882 July 14

  • Box 38, Folder 53
A response to a letter from Charles. It involves Charles work in the law office of Richards and Baskin. He mentions sending letters from Mrs. Clay and Teetee.
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Harry Clay to Charles D. Clay, 1882 July 26

  • Box 63, Folder 45
Harry asks several times about Charles’s condition but encourages him to return to Louisville and his position or Alex. Jackson his intimated that he will have to fill the place with someone else.
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Harry Clay to D.S. Brainard, 1884 July 5

  • Box 38, Folder 48
Harry expresses his delight that Brainard survived the Greely expedition and knew of his efforts to save them. He explains his plan and his failure to convince General Hazen that it would be successful.
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Harry Clay to Augustus Greeley (copy), 1884 July 5

  • Box 38, Folder 49
Harry expresses his delight that Greely had been saved and explains his plan to rescue them and the refusal of Hazen to entertain it.
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To Harry Clay, 1880-1884

  • Box 38-39, 44, 63

Unknown to Harry Clay, undated

  • Box 38, Folder 54
(wife of Inspector General Smith of Greenland?) Note in hand of Mrs. Blanford suggests author. The author is aware of his family connections and his political ambition. Talks, seriously or otherwise, about his returning to Greenland.
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H.W. Howgate to Harry Clay, 1880 April 23

  • Box 44, Folder 69
Howgate invites Clay to join the expedition. Notes need for Senate approval. If that fails he will launch a private venture.
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Henry Howgate to Harry Clay, 1880 April 30

  • Box 44, Folder 70
Howgate gives Clay the details of sailing and urges him to make personal preparations.
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H.W. Howgate to Harry Clay, 1880 May 16

  • Box 44, Folder 71
Government delays have pushed starting date back to approximately June 1.
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H.W. Howgate to Harry Clay, 1880 June 7

  • Box 44, Folder 72
Urges him to be in Washington by June 12.
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J.W. McGee to Harry Clay, 1880 June 26

  • Box 63, Folder 36
McGee asks for instructions concerning payment of city attorney fees in cases where work is conducted in the city workhouse.
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Unknown to Harry Clay, 1881 February 15

  • Box 38, Folder 55
Includes To H.Clay by J.T. White Letter may be from Wheeler McGee. See George H . Clay to Harry Clay Feb 10, 1881. The letter is from an office holder in Louisville and discusses law suits related to his holding office and being paid. The letter also includes a poem entitled To H. Clay by J. T. White. The poem refers to his arctic expedition and local friends.
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Henry Howgate to Harry Clay, 1881 February 20

  • Box 63, Folder 16
Howgate informs Clay that if the appropriations bill passes congress Lt. Greely will lead a party and meet him around Aug 1.
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Nat J. Crutchfield to Harry Clay, 1881 February 22

  • Box 38, Folder 56
Crutchfield informs Harry of national and political events. He mentions the presentation by Gov. Blackburn of a violin to Miss Currie, the daughter of General (Basil) Duke. Generally, it is a letter between close friends.
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Henry Howgate to Harry Clay, 1881 March 6

  • Box 63, Folder 17
Howgate informs Clay of the progress on future expeditions and delivers assurances re Susan M. Clay’s health.
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Amerius Symmzonia, 1881 May 1

  • Box 38, Folder 57
Symmes asks Clay to verify some scientific assumptions his father had made. One involved a dip in the compass needle when the eightieth degree of north latitude was passed. The other involved a warm area above the 80 degree.
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Margarethe Smith to Harry Clay, 1881 July 13

  • Box 38, Folder 58
Smith asks him to leave some magazines for her at Upernavik. (Harry was friends with the wife of one of the Greenland officials named Smith.)
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Basil Duke to Harry Clay, 1881 October 8

  • Box 38, Folder 59
Duke encourages Harry to began a lecture tour about his voyage and announce his return to the practice of law as well. There may be slight political overtones to the letter as well. Duke notes that Major Richards and Baskin agree with him. All three are involved in the practice of law and in Louisville politics.
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Augustus Greeley to Harry Clay (Copy), 1881 August 16

  • Box 38, Folder 60
Copy (Original in Library of Congress). Greely expresses regret at Clay’s withdrawal from the expedition and thanks him for the sacrifice of his own interests.
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Brig. General W.B. Hazen to Harry Clay, 1881 October 3

  • Box 38, Folder 61
Hazen inquires about a box entrusted to Clay by Lieut. Kislingbury, one of the members of the Greely Expedition.
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W.P. Rice to Harry Clay, 1882 February 6

  • Box 38, Folder 62
Photographs related to the Howgate Expedition, an exploration venture to the Arctic that Harry joined.
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George Tyson, A.G.O. War Department to Harry Clay, 1882 March 17

  • Box 38, Folder 63
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J.C.S. Blackburn to Harry Clay, 1882 March 30

  • Box 38, Folder 64
Blackburn, Ky member of House of Representatives, has contacted General Hazen for Harry and will apprise him of Hazen’s action.
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J. Keegan to Harry Clay, 1882 August 10

  • Box 39, Folder 3
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W.B. Hazan to Harry Clay, 1882 October 7

  • Box 38, Folder 65
Hazen writes about the Greely expedition and Harry’s offer to help in their rescue.
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W.B. Moore t